• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

With a foreword by Norman Denzin Communication and the history of technology have invariably been examined in terms of artefacts and people. Gary Krug argues that communication technology must be studied as an integral part of culture and lived-experience. Rather than stand in awe of the apparent explosion of new technologies, this book links key moments and developments in communication technology with the social conditions of their time. It traces the evolution of technology, culture, and the self as mutually dependent and influential. This innovative approach will be welcomed by undergraduates and postgraduates needing to develop their understanding of the cultural effects of communication technology, and the history of key communication systems and techniques.

Technology as Culture
Technology as culture

Our tragedy today is a general and a universal physical fear so long sustained by now that we can even bear it. There are no longer problems of the spirit. There is only the question: when will I be blown up? Because of this, the young man or woman writing today has forgotten the problems of the heart in conflict with itself … His griefs grieve on no universal bones, leaving no scars. He writes not of the heart but of the glands. (William Faulkner 1950)

A common truism of the current day is that technology is accelerating at unprecedented speeds. While many refinements and extensions of communication technology into the personal world are indeed occurring with great rapidity the truism ...

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