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In: Bourdieu and Culture

Chapter 6: Manet, the Musée D'Orsay, and the Installation of Art

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Manet, the Musée D'Orsay, and the Installation of Art
Manet, the musée d'orsay, and the installation of art

If you climb the steps of the National Gallery in London, erected in 1832–38 by William Wilkins, to ‘provide the crowning visual effect for the newly made Trafalgar Square’1 at the top of the government offices of Whitehall extending northwards from the Houses of Parliament, and if you pass, free of charge, through the vestibule designed by Sir John Taylor in 1885–87,2 and then mount the stairs to the right, you reach the galleries exhibiting ‘Painting from 1700 to 1920’, the third of which contains three paintings by Édouard Manet (1832–83). You approach Room 43 (which contains the Manets) through Room 45 (‘Nineteenth to Twentieth Century. Cézanne. Monet.’) ...

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