Previous Chapter Chapter 4: Flaubert and the Social Ambivalence of Literary Invention Next Chapter

In: Bourdieu and Culture

Chapter 4: Flaubert and the Social Ambivalence of Literary Invention

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Flaubert and the Social Ambivalence of Literary Invention
Flaubert and the social ambivalence of literary invention

In one of the earliest works on Flaubert — first published in 1899 only 19 years after the novelist's death — Émile Faguet began his study in the following way:

Gustave Flaubert was born at Rouen on the 12th December 1821.

His father, the son of a veterinary surgeon of Nogent-sur-Seine, after studying medicine in Paris, had settled down at Rouen, where he had become the highly esteemed and even celebrated Dr. Flaubert, surgeon-in-chief of the Hôtel-Dieu Hospital, where he lived.

His mother, Anne Justine Caroline Fleuriot, was born at Pont I'Èivêque in Calvados, and was, through her mother, connected with the oldest families in Lower Normandy. Gustave Flaubert was therefore a Champenois through ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website