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In: American Educational History: School, Society, and the Common Good

Chapter 8: The Liberal Philosophy of Education as Distinguished from Conservatism

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The Liberal Philosophy of Education as Distinguished from Conservatism
The liberal philosophy of education as distinguished from conservatism

Changes in educational philosophy ultimately affect school practice. This cause-and-effect relationship may not emerge immediately, but may take years and decades before transformations in educational tenets imbue the classroom. The 1890s and particularly the early 1900s laid the foundation for considerable educational change in the nation's schools. During this time, the liberal school of education flowered in the United States, particularly under the tutelage of John Dewey and his colleagues (Dupuis, 1966; Walker, 1963). Dewey and his associates did not found the liberal school of philosophical thought. Rather, liberalism first emerged under the leadership of individuals such as Rousseau, Locke, and Bacon (Dupuis, 1966). Nevertheless, Dewey, especially, was ...

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