• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Globalization and a neo-liberal world order are impacting the global urban system, resulting in massive transformation of cities across the world. This transformation, which is currently the center of focus among sociologists, will continue as more and more city spaces are occupied in the wake of globalization.

This book is a collection of essays written by some of the most famous theoreticians and academics in the area of urban studies on this transformation process of cities and its socio-economic ramifications.

These essays analyze the signs of intense spatial crisis in metropolises, revealing the contradictory processes of integration and segmentation that characterize the critical nature of global city space. Crisis of urban space in such cities, the book argues, is essentially related to their placement in the world city system and the limitations in their globalocal networks. Restructuring spaces also leads to differentiated and contradictory processes, the book reveals, since not all segments of the population are affected equally. The process benefits only parts of society and, therefore, only parts of the city space. This book shows how Centre and Periphery, reflect the differentiation between global society and segmented localities, how these stand spatially anchored, creating a background of intense urban conflicts.

This volume explores and exposes a divided framework in which globalization operates towards fragmentation and polarization; debunking the myth of homogenization. The essays reveal that cities and regions across the world get incorporated into this system, exhibiting characteristics that are more diverse and complex than ever before especially due to the increasingly contradictory relationship with their local resource and cultural base.

Urban Transport Projects in a Globalised Scenario*
Urban transport projects in a globalised scenario
DarrylD'Monte

Since the 1990s, there has been a thrust in the country's transport sector towards increasing reliance on private investment. This can take many forms: private entrepreneurs constructing roads and bridges, often on a ‘build, operate and transfer’ basis, the entry of many multinational car manufacturers and easing of restrictions in imports of components. Throughout urban India, which now accounts for some 300 million people, the perception that the state is unwilling or unable to provide quick and reliable transport, is fast gaining ground. There is an increasing dependence on private modes of motorised transport, whether it is automobiles, two-wheelers or buses.

Middle-class citizens aspire to own or use these vehicles and believe that ...

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