• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

“Vincent Ryan Ruggiero's book is a refreshing change from the usual supplemental book. Rather than a catalogue of ideas and names, he presents a form of analysis that involves students in the sociological process. This book should make students want to continue to study sociology.” --Muriel G. Cantor, Late of the American University “This book potentially makes a unique contribution to the field, providing a new perspective for introductory students that is not readily available today…. Vincent Ryan Ruggiero has a surprisingly good sense of sociological enterprise.” --Peter Adler, Professor of Sociology, University of Denver A thorough study of any discipline requires effective thinking strategies; however, rarely has an entire volume been devoted to developing this skill. Vincent Ryan Ruggiero's A Guide to Sociological Thinking fills the gap in sociology where others fall short. What distinguishes this volume from competing texts is its comprehensive treatment of thinking. It covers sociological thinking from three dimensions--critical, creative, and reflective--and emphasizes the practical application of thinking strategies to sociological issues. It aims to increase sociology students' cognitive learning and has the following objectives: To build appreciation of the intellectual excitement and adventure of sociological inquiry and of the relevance of that inquiry to student's lives.; To develop understanding of the three stages of the thinking process--reflective, creative, and critical.; To develop skill in applying the thinking process to sociological issues.; To promote the habits and attitudes associated with excellence in thinking.; To encourage students to enter the discipline's ongoing dialogue. Intended as a supplement to the standard sociology textbook, A Guide to Sociological Thinking, will enhance a student's grasp of sociology and will be useful to other related undergraduate courses as social problems and the sociology of work.

The Role of Thinking in Sociology
The role of thinking in sociology

Contrary to popular misconception, sociology is neither a kind of social work nor a collection of commonsense notions about society. It is the scientific study of collective human behavior, and its focus is broader than most other disciplines, in particular the other social sciences. Biology focuses on the physical nature of animal and plant life, psychology on human behavior, and anthropology on the origin and development of human beings and their societies. But sociology is concerned with the interplay between people's purposive behavior, which sociologists call human agency, and the various social organizations—home, school, church, government, business, the entertainment and communication media, and so on.

If you've bought into the popular stereotype of scientific research, ...

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