Students pursue problems they’re curious about, not problems they’re told to solve. Creating a math classroom filled with confident problem solvers starts by introducing challenges discovered in the real world, not by presenting a sequence of prescribed problems, says Gerald Aungst. In this groundbreaking book, he offers a thoughtful approach for instilling a culture of learning in your classroom through five powerful, yet straightforward principles: Conjecture, Collaboration, Communication, Chaos, and Celebration. Aungst shows you how to  • Embrace collaboration and purposeful chaos to help students engage in productive struggle, using non-routine and unsolved problems  • Put each chapter’s principles into practice through a variety of strategies, activities, and by incorporating technology tools  • Introduce substantive, lasting cultural changes in your classroom through a manageable, gradual shift in processes and behaviors Five Principles of the Modern Mathematics Classroom offers new ideas for inspiring math students by building a more engaging and collaborative learning environment. “Bravo! This book brings a conceptual framework for K-12 mathematics to life. As a parent and as the executive director of Edutopia, I commend Aungst for sharing his 5 principles. This is a perfect blend of inspiring and practical. Highly recommended!” Cindy Johanson, Executive Director, Edutopia George Lucas Educational Foundation “Aungst ignites the magic of mathematics by reminding us what makes mathematicians so passionate about their subject matter. Grounded in research, his work takes us on a journey into classrooms so that we may take away tips to put into practice today.” Erin Klein, Teacher, Speaker, and Author of Redesigning Learning Spaces

Collaboration

Collaboration

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Learning to collaborate is part of equipping yourself for effectiveness, problem solving, innovation and life-long learning in an ever-changing networked economy.

—Don Tapscott, Business Executive, Author, and Consultant

I collaborate and sometimes don’t agree at all with my collaborators’ opinions. It forces you to understand why you don’t agree with something: what’s the fight you’re picking.

—Ira Glass, American Public Radio Personality and Producer

But, Isn’t That Cheating?

When I cotaught fifth grade math, one of our routines was to give our students a challenging problem every Friday. At the beginning of the year, I explained the expectations for the weekly problem.

“You have one week to work on it. Next Friday, you need to turn in your solution with all of your work.”

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