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Summer School

  • By: Charlotte Alice Agger & Jessie Montana Cain
  • In: Sociology of Education: An A-to-Z Guide
  • Edited by: James Ainsworth
  • Subject:Sociology of Education (general), Sociology of Education, Education Policy

The institution of summer school began as a result of a shifting economy, increased family mobility, technological advances, and the passage of child labor laws. Although early summer school programs in the United States were more focused on removing delinquents from the streets, current programs provide remedial, enrichment-focused, and accelerated learning opportunities for students. In addition to providing various learning opportunities, summer school also encourages an internationally competitive school system and fosters high educational principles.

Historical Context

Nearly a century ago, family mobility and a standardized school curriculum led to the establishment of the nine-month school calendar. Prior to this time, when much of the livelihood of American families was based on agricultural practices, school calendars were tailored to the specific communities they served. That is, children ...

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