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Social Rationality

The term social rationality covers a family of conceptions of goal-directed behavior that have one feature in common: they proceed from the assumption that each individual's ability to pursue goals more or less intelligently and the way goals are pursued (the mode of rationality) are strongly influenced by social conditions. This conception stands in contrast to “natural rationality” in which the individual's ability to pursue goals more or less intelligently is assumed to be naturally given and the same for all. The latter even holds for a great number of “bounded rationality” approaches in which human biases in judgment and limitations in calculatory ability are explicitly admitted. Important assumptions of the natural rationality approach include the veridicality of expectations, common knowledge (i.e., cognitive coordination) of ...

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