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New Hampshire

  • By: Justin Corfield
  • In: Encyclopedia of Motherhood
  • Edited by: Andrea O'Reilly
  • Subject:Sociology of Gender, Parenting, Maternal Health

The Algonquian tribes lived in the region that became New Hampshire for many centuries before the arrival of Europeans in about 1600, with the first settlement established in 1623. These early settlers established small communities, and with intermarriage between some of the early pioneer families, it was not long before many people had extended families, which helped mothers in birthing and bringing up their children.

The life of pioneer women was hard, with most having to combine the bringing up of children and preparing of food with the maintenance of the household. Problems over home birthing led to many children dying as infants, and also to a high maternity mortality rate. The statesman Daniel Webster (1782–1852) was one of 10 children his mother looked after on ...

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