• Entry
  • Reader's guide
  • Entries A-Z
  • Subject index

Media Content: Televised Entertainment

  • By: Kelly Fudge Albada
  • In: Encyclopedia of Health Communication
  • Edited by: Teresa L. Thompson
  • Subject:Public Health Education & Health Promotion, Health Psychology, Health Communication

Popular television genres such as medical dramas, situation comedies, and daytime serials may make salient health struggles or health care situations as part of character development and story plotlines. A therapist may uncover the personal background or childhood memories of a character; emergency room doctors may treat car crash victims, operate on a patient with heart abnormalities, and deliver a baby, all during their nightly shifts; or a husband and wife may struggle with a cancer diagnosis or a depressed child. Researchers largely support that fictional programming may teach the public about diseases and medical procedures, as well as reflect cultural norms surrounding health and health care.

Entertainment television may be a particularly savvy health educator and attitude shaper. Building on transportation theory, some authors argue ...

    • Loading...
    locked icon

    Sign in to access this content

    Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

    • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
    • Read modern, diverse business cases
    • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles