Numbers and Stories: Using Children's Literature to Teach Young Children Number Sense

Books

Rita C. Janes & Elizabeth L. Strong

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Chapters
  • Front Matter
  • Back Matter
  • Subject Index
  • Part I: Here's the Story: Fundamental Components for Developing Number Sense Using Children's Literature

    Part II: Children's Literature and Number Sense Investigations

  • Dedication

    To my husband Jack for his support and encouragement; to my son Robert and his wife Joanne; my son David and his wife Joanne; my daughter Jacqui; and granddaughters, Emma and Trinity Anne, who love books, numbers, and learning.

    To the many wonderful classroom teachers I have worked with over the years, whose passion, enthusiasm, and caring for the children they taught and their wish for them to have successful, positive, and enjoyable mathematical experiences inspired me to ensure that would happen.

    RCJ

    For my special great nieces and nephews Elexus, Tyler, and Charles Strong; Katelyn and Nathan Grant; Benjamin and Samuel Hawn; and Madison Klotz whose curiosity and enjoyment in and appreciation for books continue to inspire me to identify the potential and joys of new books from all genres and to share with them the delights in these books.

    ELS

    Copyright

    View Copyright Page

    Preface

    Many teachers enjoy integrating children's literature throughout all or most curriculum areas. However, when integrating mathematics and children's literature, they ask for support in implementing rich mathematical learning experiences that emanate from the literature and are sufficiently significant and meaningful to meet the learning expectations of the prescribed curriculum standards they are using.

    Numbers and Stories: Using Children's Literature to Teach Young Children Number Sense provides instructional support based on what is known from pedagogical research and practice related to integrating meaningfully mathematics and children's literature and to creating purposefully mathematical learning experiences that originate from the literature. The book fosters children's learning of important mathematics in a context that is “robust and relevant to the real world” (Common Core State Standards Initiative [CCSSI], 2012b). In this book such a context is provided mainly through children's literature that relates in a real or fictional manner to their daily experiences.

    The purpose of this book is to provide a professional teaching and learning resource to meet the above stated needs of teachers. It is intended for teachers of young children, kindergarten to Grade 2, and professional development consultants. A secondary audience is mentors and coaches, early childhood and primary education professors and students, and school district and department of education curriculum consultants and administrators.

    How the Book Is Organized

    Numbers and Stories is divided into two parts—Part I: Here's the Story: Fundamental Components for Developing Number Sense Using Children's Literature and Part II: Children's Literature and Number Sense Investigations. Part I, organized into five chapters, presents the design and special features of the instructional approach used in the Investigations (Part II), along with the pedagogical research and knowledge gleaned from best practices that support this approach.

    Included in Part II are 21 Investigations, each introduced through a quality mathematics-related children's book depicting the mathematics being explored that is revisited and used as a resource throughout each Investigation. The content of these Investigations focuses on the development of number sense for the young child (kindergarten to Grade 2), with clearly stated learning expectations chosen from the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Mathematics (2012b) and in keeping with other mathematics curriculum documents across North America. Besides the mathematics content associated with number sense, the processes of mathematics, such as problem solving, reasoning, communicating, representing, and making connections, are integrated throughout the Investigations. As well, the Investigations include learning expectations from the CCSSI for English Language Arts (2012a) related to literacy—in particular, reading standards for literature, informational text, and foundational skills; writing standards; speaking and listening standards; and language standards.

    The Investigations are designed so that children are actively involved, physically and mentally, in rich problem solving tasks that support the development of mathematical understanding and procedures and where children are encouraged to use their own strategies and prior knowledge to find solutions to these tasks. These tasks include well-designed questions throughout to create an inquiry based environment where discourse provides the foundation for learning how to reason mathematically.

    The Investigations may be experienced by various groups of children, at various age levels, at various times throughout the school year and may be revisited at any time. There is no set sequential order for their implementation since teachers know their children best and the mathematics they want them to achieve. The Investigations are not meant to be translated standard by standard but more woven as a lattice and “the order of the Standards neither implies a teaching sequence nor sets out connections among ideas in different topics” (CCSSI, 2012b).

    Special Features of the Book

    Carefully Designed, Engaging, Interactive Mathematics Investigations Connected to Common Core State Standards Supported by Research—The learning expectations for the Investigations are selected from the CCSS for Mathematics (CCSSI, 2012b) and the CCSS for English Language Arts (CCSSI, 2012a) for children in kindergarten to Grade 2 (Learning Expectations Correlation Chart, Appendix F). As well, they are correlated with the learning expectations associated with the curriculum standards used in most schools in North America, even if schools have chosen not to use CCSS.

    Formative Assessment Throughout Each Investigation—The main assessment tool in the Investigations is observation, providing support and guidance for the teacher while monitoring children's learning. It is intended to determine how well the children are meeting the stated learning expectations as they work actively and in an inquiring manner on the problem solving tasks. It assists also the teacher in being more responsive to and flexible in making appropriate moment-to-moment decisions to meet the children's needs.

    Reflection and Discussion Questions and Prompts for Children and Teachers—At the end of each Investigation, questions and prompts are provided to guide children and teachers as they think consciously about and communicate their experiences and feelings while engaged in the Investigation. As the reflections are shared with peers and colleagues, learning is enhanced and teaching is improved to better meet the needs of all children.

    Acknowledgments

    Writing this professional teaching and learning book evolved slowly over many years. It has been truly a cooperative writing venture that has required immense collaboration and appreciation for each other's professional expertise. However, its completion would not have been possible without the help, support, and encouragement from many people throughout the process.

    We are indebted greatly to the Corwin Press team who accepted our manuscript and guided us relentlessly with care and understanding throughout this challenging but rewarding writing journey. After senior acquisition editor Robin Najar read the manuscript she informed us that she saw its potential and endorsed it. We thank her profusely. Ariel Price, editorial assistant, was most patient in guiding us through the editorial stage, making sure our manuscript was properly organized and all the elements were included. We are most grateful to her. And Laura Barrett, production editor, as well as Amy Schroller, project editor guided us reassuringly through each stage of the production process; we are truly grateful to them as well. To all of you and those at Corwin who assisted in any way to make this book become a reality, we thank you.

    The reviewers’ (Julie Duford, Debra Scarpelli, and Michelle Tavenner) constructive and supportive comments were most helpful and encouraging, providing us guidance as we reviewed and revised continuously our manuscript. We are most appreciative.

    From Rita

    I extend a sincere appreciation to my family, colleagues, teachers, and students that I had the good fortune to share my love of mathematics with over the past 50 years. I am especially grateful that they accompanied me on this incredible journey of teaching, learning, and enjoying mathematics. In particular, I am grateful for experiencing the joy on the faces of children and teachers when they experienced those ‘aha’ moments while learning and teaching the important mathematics included in the Investigations in this book.

    A very special thank-you to Jack and Jacqui, two very special people in my life, who offered so much love, support, and encouragement while writing this book.

    I also express my appreciation to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) community in the United States and Canada. I am grateful for the opportunities provided by serving on the NCTM board and committees but most of all the learning from all the mathematics teachers that I had the pleasure to meet and learn from as a fifty-one-year member of this professional organization.

    From Elizabeth

    I am most grateful to the many primary and elementary students I have been fortunate to teach and learn from. They demonstrated innately and freely their curiosity and enthusiasm for and engagement in children's books from all literary genres throughout the curriculum. Such joys and involvement in their books inspired me to pursue further studies in the area of children's and adolescent literature. As well, I am deeply thankful to my undergraduate and graduate students who further motivated and challenged me by their eagerness and desire to integrate literature in their curriculum and by sharing their insights related to the importance and power of literature in their students’ lives. To all of them, I am sincerely appreciative and hope that they will continue to enjoy and share their compassion for literature with their students and colleagues.

    I express also my heartfelt thanks to the teachers and colleagues I have taught with and learned from and those whom I had worked with through professional development. All have demonstrated their commitment and dedication in assisting young children to discover the importance and power of literature in their lives—as well as its value across the curriculum.

    My siblings and their families have been instrumental in providing ongoing love, support, and encouragement throughout my educational and professional journeys. Jim (Glenda) Strong, Pearl (Hugh) Grant, and Percy (Jean) Strong have followed me through each stage of my journeys and celebrated each milestone. To them, I am immeasurably grateful. My nieces and nephews—Jennifer (Christian) Hawn, Christina (Scott) Sutton, and Steven (Lorri) Strong; John (Sherry) Grant, Janet (Andrew) Carpenter, and Timothy Grant; and Christopher and Andrew Strong—have shared with me from the youngest of their years their joys and engagement in all genres of literature and the importance of it in their lives. To them, I thank them most sincerely and will support and encourage them as they continue to value literature in their lives and their children's lives.

    Publisher's Acknowledgments

    Corwin would like to thank the following individuals for taking the time to provide their editorial insight and guidance:

    • Julie Duford, Fifth Grade Teacher
    • Polson Middle School
    • Winner of the 2004 Presidential Award for Teaching Elementary Mathematics
    • Polson, MT
    • Debra Scarpelli, Math Teacher
    • Slater Jr. High School
    • Pawtucket, RI
    • Michelle Tavenner, Teacher
    • Gahanna-Jefferson Public Schools
    • Gahanna, OH

    About the Authors

    Rita C. Janes has spent a lifetime as a teacher. She taught at all levels of schooling, including the teaching of mathematics and mathematics education for preservice teachers. She served as a mathematics professional development consultant at the district level with responsibilities from kindergarten to Grade 12. In recent years she has been facilitating workshops on mathematics instruction with teachers and school districts across Canada and the United States. She has a special interest in supporting teachers as they strive to integrate the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Process Standards and the CCSS for Mathematical Practice into the content of elementary mathematics programs, helping to make these programs come alive in the classroom.

    Rita promotes the use of rich problem solving tasks, mathematical discourse, and the posing of good questions to ensure inquiry-oriented classroom environments for all children. Observing how young children are more successful learners of mathematics when it is presented in a familiar context, she finds great success in using children's literature as this context.

    Rita has served on the board of directors of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM); the the board of directors of the NCTM; chair of the NCTM Professional Development Services Committee; chair of the NCTM Affiliate Services Committee; member of the NCTM Educational Services Committee; president of Newfoundland and Labrador Teachers’ Association (NLTA) Mathematics Council; president of the NLTA Elementary Teachers’ Council; and editor of Teaching Mathematics (an NLTA publication).

    Elizabeth L. Strong is first and foremost a teacher. Her career began as a primary–elementary teacher, then elementary school administrator, school district primary education coordinator, and university professor. Elizabeth's professional journey has focused mainly on literacy, language arts, and children's literature. She has been and continues to be an international, national, provincial, and regional professional development presenter and facilitator of topics related to these areas. However, as of late, her main focus is using effectively children literature in the classroom to encourage young children to discover and explore the delights in books of all genres and to support, extend, and enrich all areas of the curriculum.

    Elizabeth has served on the International Board on Books for Young Children; the Canadian Children's Book Centre: Our Choice Committee; the Prime Minister's Awards for Teaching Excellence in Science, Technology, and Mathematics Committee; and Canadian Association for Young Children. She has been a member of the Journal of the Early Childhood Education Council, the College of the North Atlantic Early Childhood Education Committee, the International Reading Association, and a member of and reviewer for the Journal of the National Council of Teachers of English, as well as the president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Teachers’ Association (NLTA) Reading Council.

  • Appendices

    Appendix A (1–4)—Unit I. Counting and Cardinality

    Appendix B (1–12)—Unit II. Whole Number and Operations Relationships

    Appendix C (1–5)—Unit III. Operations and Algebraic Thinking

    Appendix D (1–8)—Unit I V. Operations Within 100/Place Value

    Appendix E (1–2)—Duplicated Appendices

    Appendix F—Learning Expectations Correlation Chart

    Appendix A (1)

    The Water Hole Investigation: Matching Numeral, Word, and Animal

    Name____________Date________

    Complete the following chart:

    NumeralNumber WordAnimal Drawing
    one
    2
    four
    5
    Appendix A (2)

    5-Frame

    Appendix A (3)

    How Many Snails? A Counting Book Investigation: Language Pattern Chart

    Language Pattern Chart

    Appendix A (4)

    Ten Little Fish Investigation: Word Problems

    Provide partners with a copy of each of the word problems.

    Appendix B (1)

    Ten Flashing Fireflies Investigation: Fireflies

    Name:_____________Date:________

    Fireflies

    In the Summer NightIn the JarEquations
    100
    1
    2
    7
    5
    4
    3
    8
    1
    0

    Appendix B (2)

    Ten Flashing Fireflies Investigation: Make 10

    Name: ____________ Date: _____

    Complete the equations. Check answers with a partner.

    • 4 + ______ = 10
    • ______ + 8 = 10
    • 5 + ______ = 10
    • 2 + ______ = 10
    • 10 = ______ + 10
    • 1 + ______ = 10
    • ______ + 3 = 10

    Write each equation as a subtraction equation with the unknown number on the right-hand side of the equation.

    Appendix B (3)

    Ten Flashing Fireflies Investigation: Matching

    Name: ____________________ Date: _____

    • Choose the letter (A, B, C …) corresponding to the equation in Column 2 that matches the equation in Column 1. Write the letter in the blank in Column 1.
    Column 1Column 2
    • 10 − □ = 6____
    • 1 + 9 = □ _____
    • 2 + □ = 10_____
    • 5 + □ = 10 _____
    • 3 + □ = 10_____
    • 10 − □ = 4_____
    • 10 − 8 = □_____
    • 10 − 3 = □
    • □ + 8 = 10
    • 10 − 5 = □
    • 6 + □ = 10
    • 10 − □= 1
    • 10 − 2 = □
    • 4 + □ 10
    Appendix B (4)

    365 Penguins Investigation: Lining Up Tiles

    Names: __________ and __________ Date: _____

    Appendix B (5)

    365 Penguins Investigation: Adding Even Numbers

    Names: ________ and ________ Date: _____

    Complete the following chart:

    What do you notice?

    Appendix B (6)

    365 Penguins Investigation: Adding Odd Numbers

    Names: _______ and ________ Date: _____

    Complete the following chart:

    What do you notice?

    Appendix B (7)

    Four 100s Charts

    Appendix B (8)

    Two Ways to Count to Ten: A Liberian Folktale Investigation: How Many?

    Appendix B (9)

    Two Ways to Count to Ten: A Liberian Folktale Investigation: Numbers in Common

    Numbers in Common

    Appendix B (10)

    Minnie's Diner: A Multiplying Menu Investigation: How Many Pies?

    Name: __________ Date: _____

    Complete the chart to show how many each of the other brothers and the father will receive if the following occurs:

    • Will orders 2 cherry pies when he first comes in the diner.
    • Will orders 3 cherry pies when he first comes in the diner.
    • Will orders 4 cherry pies when he first comes in the diner.
    • Will orders 10 cherry pies when he first comes in the diner.
    Appendix B (11)

    Minnie's Diner: A Multiplying Menu Investigation: Double or Add 2

    Name: ____________ Date:_____

    Which purse would you rather have?

    Appendix B (12)

    How Do You Count a Dozen Ducklings? Investigation: Equal Groups for 12

    Name: _____________ Date: _____

    Directions: Partners choose 12 counters to represent the ducks. Take turns arranging the counters in as many equal groups as possible. Sketch groupings.

    Write corresponding addition and multiplication equations for each grouping

    Appendix C (1)

    Balancing Act/Equal Shmequals Investigation: Balance the Equation

    Name: _____________ Date: _____

    Appendix C (2)

    The Tub People Investigation: The Tub People in Two Places

    Name:__________ Date:_____

    The Tub People in Two Places

    Appendix C (3)

    The Tub People Investigation: The Tub People in Three Places

    Name:_________________ Date:_____

    Appendix C (4)

    What's the Difference? An Endangered Animal Subtraction Story Investigation: Endangered Animal Problems These problems may be assigned to children at different times during the year.

    Endangered Animal Problems:

    With your partner discuss and make a plan for solving each problem. Record solutions, and include drawings, words, numbers, and equation.

    Appendix C (5)

    The Twelve Days of Summer Investigation: Number of Gifts

    Name: _________ Date: _____

    Complete the following chart:

    DayNumber of GiftsTotal
    First
    Second
    Third
    Fourth
    Fifth
    Sixth
    Seventh
    Eighth
    Ninth
    Tenth
    Eleventh
    Twelfth
    Appendix D (1)

    Centipede's 100 Shoes Investigation: Centipede Word Problems

    Appendix D (2)

    Centipede's 100 Shoes Investigation: Centipede's Cousin Looney

    Name: _________ Date: ________

    • Choose from the numbers in the box so that the story problem about the centipede's cousin named Looney makes sense.

    At _______ o'clock Looney, the centipede, goes to the store to buy ______ shoes.

    He wants ______ for the left feet and ______ for the right feet.

    When he gets home ______ shoes have laces and the rest have Velcro.

    How many have Velcro? ______

    • Share and discuss choices of numbers with the whole group.
    Appendix D (3)

    Centipede's 100 Shoes Investigation: What Is the Question?

    What Is the Question?

    Appendix D (4)

    Let's Count (A) Investigation: Representing Numbers in Different Ways

    Name: __________ Date: __________

    Complete the chart, and check answers with a partner.

    NumeralNumber NameDrawing with Cubes
    16
    19
    fourteen
    12
    seventeen
    18
    Appendix D (5)

    Let's Count (A) Investigation: Place Value Representations

    Name: _____________ Date: ______

    Complete the chart and check answers with a partner.

    Numeral____ tens and ____ ones10 + ____
    161 ten and 6 ones10 + 6
    19
    1 ten and 1 one
    10 + 7
    12
    1 ten and 8 ones
    14
    10 + 5
    10
    1 ten and 3 ones
    Appendix D (6)

    Let's Count (B) Investigation: How Do I Get the Number?

    Name:_____________Date:______

    Key the start number into your calculator. Without pressing Clear, get the next number listed in the column on the chart. Tell what you did (added or subtracted and how much) to get it.

    Start with 23This is what I added or subtracted:
    33Example: I added 10.
    23
    53
    73
    23
    13
    113
    Appendix D (7)

    Let's Count (B) Investigation: Riddles

    Name:_____________Date:______

    Complete the following riddles:

    • I have 73 ones. Who am I?__________
    • I have 30 ones and 6 tens. Who am I?__________
    • I have 3 tens and 17 ones. Who am I?__________
    • I have__________ones. I have 3 tens. My number is 43.
    • I have 24 ones and 1 ten. What number do I have?___________
    • I have 5 tens and 15 ones. What number do I have?________
    • My number is 99. How many more ones do I need to have 100?_________
    • I have________tens and 21 ones. My number is 51.
    • I have 4 tens and 26 ones. What number do I have?__________
    • Write 3 riddles of your own. Have a partner complete them.
    Appendix D (8)

    Let's Count (B) Investigation: First to Reach 0 or 100

    Names ________ and________Date________

    Appendix E (1)

    10-Frame

    Appendix E (2)

    100s Chart

    Appendix F

    Learning Expectations Correlation Chart

    This chart presents the correlation between the Investigations’ learning expectations and Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in mathematics and English language arts.

    KEY:

    • Mathematics Standards:

    Abbreviations for standards are used in the following table, as stated in the CCSS document, e.g., MP1 is the abbreviated form of “make sense of problems and persevere in solving them;” K.CC.3 is the abbreviated form of Kindergarten: Counting and Cardinality Domain, Standard 3.

    • English Language Arts Standards:
      • L (Language); RL (Reading: Literature); RI (Reading: Informational Text); RF (Reading: Foundational Skills); SL (Speaking & Listening); W (Writing)
      • K, 1, and 2 Grade Level
      • Specific standard number—that is, 1 is the first standard listed in each English language arts area
      • Here is an example: RL.K.1 means Reading: Literature Kindergarten First Standard

    References

    Andrews, J. (2007). The twelve days of summer (S.Jolliffe, Illus.). Victoria, BC: Orca.
    Baker, K. (2004). Quack and count. Toronto, ON: Harcourt.
    Baroody, A. J. (2000). Does mathematics instruction for 3 to 5 year olds really make sense?Young Children, 55(4), 61–67.
    Base, G. (2004). The water hole. New York: Puffin.
    Battista, M. T. (2002). Learning in an inquiry-based classroom: Fifth graders’ enumeration of cubes in 3D arrays. In J.Sowder & B.Schappelle (Eds.), Lessons learned from research. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Booth, D. (1998). Guiding the reading process. Markham, ON: Pembroke.
    Bruner, J. (1960). The process of education. London, UK: Oxford University.
    Chae, I. S. (2006). How do you count a dozen ducklings? (S. H.Rew, Illus.). Park Ridge, IL: Albert Whitman.
    Clements, D. H. (1999). Concrete manipulatives, concrete ideas.Contemporary issues in early childhood, 1(1), 45–60. Retrieved June 2010 from http://www.gse.buffalo.edu/org/buildingblocks/Newsletters/ConcreteYellandhttp://dx.doi.org/10.2304/ciec.2000.1.1.7
    Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2012a). Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. Washington, DC: The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy
    Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2012b). Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/
    Conrad, P. (1995). The tub people (R.Egielski, Illus.). New York: Balzer & Bray.
    Copley, J. V. (2000). The young child and mathematics. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.
    Dacey, L., & Collins, A. (2010). Zeroing in on number and operations. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.
    Dahl, M. (2005). One big building: A counting book about construction (T.Ouren, Illus.). Minneapolis, MN: Picture Window.
    de la Mare, W. (1942). Bells and grass. New York: Viking.
    Dee, R. (1988). Two ways to count to ten: A Liberian folktale (S.Meddaugh, Illus.). New York: Henry Holt.
    Dodds, D. (2007). Minnie's diner: A multiplying menu. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick.
    Donaldson, M. (1978). Children's minds. London: Fontana/Croom Helm.
    Dosemagen, D. M. (2007). Shared reflection in an online environment: Exposing and promoting students’ understanding. In W. G.Martin, M. E.Strutchens, & P. C.Elliott (Eds.), The learning of mathematics, 69th yearbook. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Freeman, E. B., & Goetz Person, D. (1998). Connecting informational children's books with content area learning. Toronto, ON: Allyn & Bacon.
    Fromental, J.-L. (2006). 365 penguins (J.Jolivet, Illus.). New York: Harry N. Abrams.
    Giganti, P., Jr. (1994). How many snails? A counting book (D.Crews, Illus.). New York: Greenwillow.
    Ginsburg, H. P., & Baron, J. (1993). Cognition: Young children's construction of mathematics. In R. J.Jensen (Ed.), Research ideas for the classroom: Early childhood mathematics (pp. 3–21). New York: Macmillan.
    Griffiths, R., & Clyne, M. (1988). Books you can count on: Linking mathematics and literature. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
    Hancock, M. (2008). A celebration of literature and response (
    3rd ed.
    ). Columbus, OH: Pearson.
    Hiebert, J. (2003). Signposts for teaching mathematics through problem solving. In F. K.Lester Jr. (Ed.), Teaching mathematics through problem solving: Prekindergarten–grade 6. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Hiebert, J., Carpenter, T., Fennema, E., Fuson, K. C., Wearne, D., Murray, H., … Human, P. (1997). Making sense: Teaching and learning mathematics with understanding. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
    Hoban, T. (1999). Let's count. New York: Greenwillow.
    Hughes, S. (2009). Olly and me 1•2•3. Somerville, MA: Candlewick.
    Hunsader, P. (2004). Mathematics trade books: Establishing their value and assessing their quality.The Reading Teacher, 57, 618–629.
    Kiefer, B., HeplerS., & Hickman, J. (2007). Charlotte Huck's children's literature (
    9th ed.
    ). New York: McGraw-Hill.
    Kilpatrick, J., Swafford, J., & Findell, B. (Eds.) (2001). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
    Kroll, V. (2005). Equal shmequal (P.O'Neill, Illus.). Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge.
    Langer, J. A. (1995). Envisioning literature: Literary understanding and literature instruction. New York: Teachers College.
    Lynch-Brown, C., & Tomlinson, C. (2008). Essentials of children's literature (
    6th ed.
    ). Boston: Pearson.
    Morrow, L., & Gambrell, L. (2004). Using children's literature in preschool: Comprehending and enjoying books. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
    Moyer, P. S., Bolyard, J. J., & Spikell, M. A. (2002). What are virtual manipulatives? Retrieved from http://www.grsc.k12.ar.us/mathresources/instruction/manipulatives/Virtual%20Manipulatives.pdf
    National Council of Teachers of English & International Reading Association. (1996). Standards for the English language arts. Urbana, IL: Author.
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1989). The curriculum and assessment standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2000). Principles and standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2001). Professional standards for teaching mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2006). Curriculum focal points for pre-kindergarten through grade 8 mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2007). Mathematics teaching today. Reston, VA: Author.
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2010). Developing essential understanding of number and numeration pre-K-2. Reston, VA: Author.
    Pappas, C., Kiefer, B., & Levstik, L. (1999). An integrated language perspective in the elementary school: An action approach. New York: Longman.
    Perry, B., & Dockett, S. (2002). Young children's access to powerful mathematics ideas. In L.English (Ed.), Handbook of international research in mathematics education (
    2nd ed.
    ) Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Ross, T. (2003). Centipede's 100 shoes. New York: Henry Holt.
    Sayre, A. P., & Sayre, J. (2010). One is a snail, ten is a crab: A counting by feet book (R.Cecil, Illus.). Cambridge, MA: Candlewick.
    Schiro, M. (1997). Integrating children's literature and mathematics in the classroom. New York: Teachers College.
    Slade, S. (2010). What's the difference? An endangered animal subtraction story. Mt. Pleasant, SC: Sylvan Dell.
    Small, M., Sheffield, L. J., Cavanagh, M., Dacey, L., Findell, C. R., & Greenes, C. E. (2004). Navigating through problem solving and reasoning in grade 2. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Smith, M. S., & Stein, M. K. (2011). Practices for orchestrating productive mathematics discussions. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
    Stice, C., Bertrand, J., & Bertrand, N. (1995). Integrating reading and the other language arts. Scarborough, ON: Thomas Nelson.
    Strong, E. (1988). Nurturing early literacy: A literature based program for at-risk first graders (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). The Ohio State University, Columbus.
    Sturges, P. (1997). Ten flashing fireflies (A.Vojtech, Illus.). New York: NorthSouth.
    Van de Walle, J. A. (1998). Elementary and middle school mathematics: Teaching developmentally (
    3rd ed.
    ). New York: Longman.
    Van de Walle, J. A. (2003). Designing and teaching mathematics through problem solving. In F. K.Lester Jr. (Ed.), Teaching mathematics through problem solving: Prekindergarten–grade 6. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Vandergrift, K. E. (1986). Child and story: The literary connection. New York: Neal-Schuman.
    Vygotsky, L. S. (1986). Thought and language. Cambridge, MA: MIT.
    Walsh, E. (2001). Mouse count. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
    Walsh, E. (2010). Balancing act. New York: Beach Lane.
    Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. (1996). Fostering metaphorical thinking through children's literature. In P. C.Elliott & M. J.Kenney (Eds.), Communication in mathematics K–12 and beyond. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Whitin, D. J., & Wilde, S. (1992). Read any good math lately? Children's books for mathematics earning, K–6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
    Whitin, P., & Whitin, D. J. (2000). Math is language too. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.
    Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. (2004). New visions for linking literature and mathematics. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.
    Wood, A. (2004). Ten little fish (B.Wood, Illus.). New York: Scholastic.
    Yackel, E. (2003). Listening to children: Informing us and guiding our instruction. In F. K.Lester Jr. (Ed.), Teaching mathematics through problem solving: Prekindergarten–grade 6. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Yackel, E., Cobb, P., Wood, T., Wheatley, G., & Merkel, G. (1990). The importance of social interaction in children's construction of mathematical knowledge. In T.Cooney (Ed.), Teaching and learning mathematics in the 1990s: 1990 yearbook of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

    Bibliography of Children's Literature for the Investigations

    Andrews, J. (2007). The twelve days of summer (S.Jolliffe, Illus.). Victoria, BC: Orca.
    Baker, K. (2004). Quack and count. Toronto, ON: Harcourt.
    Base, G. (2004). The water hole. New York: Puffin.
    Carle, E. (1987). A house for hermit crab. Natick, MA: Picture Book.
    Chae, I. S. (2006). How do you count a dozen ducklings? (S. H.Rew, Illus.). Park Ridge, IL: Albert Whitman.
    Conrad, P. (1995). The tub people (R.Egielski, Illus.). New York: Balzer & Bray.
    Dahl, M. (2005). One big building: A counting book about construction (T.Ouren, Illus.). Minneapolis, MN: Picture Window.
    Dee, R. (1988). Two ways to count to ten: A Liberian folktale (S.Meddaugh, Illus.). New York: Henry Holt.
    Dodds, D. (2007). Minnie's diner: A multiplying menu. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick.
    Fromental, J.-L. (2006). 365 penguins (J.Jolivet, Illus.). New York: Harry N. Abrams.
    Gibbons, G. (1992). Stargazers. New York: Holiday House.
    Giganti, P., Jr. (1994). How many snails? A counting book (D.Crews, Illus.). New York: Greenwillow.
    Hoban, T. (1999). Let's count. New York: Greenwillow.
    Hughes, S. (2009). Olly and me 1•2•3. Somerville, MA: Candlewick.
    Kroll, V. (2005). Equal shmequal (P.O'Neill, Illus.). Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge.
    Merriam, E. (1993). 12 Ways to Get to 11 (B.Karlin, Illus.). New York: Simon & Schuster.
    Ross, T. (2003). Centipede's 100 shoes. New York: Henry Holt.
    Sayre, A. P., & Sayre, J. (2010). One is a snail, ten is a crab: A counting by feet book (R.Cecil, Illus.). Cambridge, MA: Candlewick.
    Simon, S. (2006). Stars. New York: Programs and Genres.
    Slade, S. (2010). What's the difference? An endangered animal subtraction story. Mt. Pleasant, SC: Sylvan Dell.
    Sturges, P. (1997). Ten flashing fireflies (A.Vojtech, Illus.). New York: NorthSouth.
    Tafuri, N. (2009). The big storm: A very soggy counting book. Toronto, ON: Simon & Schuster.
    Walsh, E. (2001). Mouse count. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
    Walsh, E. (2010). Balancing act. New York: Beach Lane.
    Wood, A. (2004). Ten little fish (B.Wood, Illus.). New York: Scholastic.

    CORWIN: A SAGE Company

    The Corwin logo—a raven striding across an open book—represents the union of courage and learning. Corwin is committed to improving education for all learners by publishing books and other professional development resources for those serving the field of PreK–12 education. By providing practical, hands-on materials, Corwin continues to carry out the promise of its motto: “Helping Educators Do Their Work Better.”

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics is the public voice of mathematics education, supporting teachers to ensure equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students through vision, leadership, professional development, and research.


    • Loading...
Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website