Future Directions of Probation Officers

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    • 00:00

      [Future Directions of Probation Officers]

    • 00:03

      SPEAKER 1: Incarceration trends get a lot of play,but really, probation does a huge amountof work in our system.And so we can sometimes be overlooked for the volumethat we actually see.And I can tell you, working as a probation officer, especiallywhen I first entered the field, overwhelmed

    • 00:25

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: was an understatement.You see a lot of people, and you'reresponsible for outcomes and helpingpeople along to an extraordinary degree.And so I think volume is just oneof the realities of probation.And as incarceration becomes less of a relied upon policy,

    • 00:47

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: I think we're going to see a growth in probationpopulations.And that's going to be a really interesting strain and balance,because probation right now is reallyfocused on customizing supervisionaround the individual that you're dealing with.And so we use a validated risk assessments.And we really try to have that information, not just

    • 01:08

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: our own opinions of someone, but actuallywhat research has told us we can look for to try to help someonereally adapt and become pro-social in the community.And so balancing that informationand really customizing your supervisionand your treatment for individuals

    • 01:29

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: is really going to be up against just the sheer volumethat probation officers are expected to deal with.And I think that's going to be a huge pieceof the future for this field.When I think about the future of probation,I think of a couple things, one of whichis, oftentimes, you hear the practical side of things,

    • 01:51

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: so that people in the field having a realdisconnect from academics and researchand the empirical information.And I think, as we move towards evidence-based practicesand that is such a buzzword in the field--so as we've had a growing appreciation for that,I think we're going to see that the influence of quality

    • 02:12

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: research and really starting to infuse what we do in the field.And that has really not been the case for a very long time.So it's an exciting time to be in probation, because Ithink we're going to start to see those two worldskind of blend.And we're going to be able to use each other to answerquestions that will help us both understand crime

    • 02:37

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: and how to deal with it and how to hopefully prevent itin the future.So I think that's one thing.I think an increasing expectationthat probation officers are goingto come with a skill set of working with peopleand not necessarily needing to have treatmentor clinical skills, but that there'sgoing to be an increasing emphasis

    • 02:57

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: on how well do you work with people?How can you work with people that are resistant,who don't really want to be working with youor doing what you say you have to say?And how do you get them on board with making a change,even when they don't want to?And I think that's going to be a really important piecefor anyone working in probation in this field in the coming

    • 03:20

      SPEAKER 1 [continued]: decade.

Future Directions of Probation Officers

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Abstract

Jessica Johnston gives her perspective on the future of probation officers. She describes an increase in the need for probation officers, the shift to a more evidence-based approach, and the emphasis on working well with people.

Future Directions of Probation Officers

Jessica Johnston gives her perspective on the future of probation officers. She describes an increase in the need for probation officers, the shift to a more evidence-based approach, and the emphasis on working well with people.

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