Driving While Intoxicated: Work Release

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    • 00:00

      [Chapter Ten.Chris, Work release and home detention]

    • 00:04

      CHRIS: I did the first three monthsof what they call the work release program,and that was really difficult for me.A lot of times, people go to work at oneparticular place-- let's say it's a gas station.And you work at a gas station, and your phone is there.And they can come and check up with you at any point in time,and you don't have any difficultiesof violating that condition.

    • 00:26

      CHRIS [continued]: As a general contractor, I was on the move at all times.I had jobs in four different locations of Boulder,and I had to move myself around.And that made it very difficult for the policeto track where I was.So oftentimes, I was in violationof where I was supposed to be at what point in time where

    • 00:46

      CHRIS [continued]: if they could contact me.Twice during those three months Iwas really incarcerated where that program stopped.I was removed from the ROCK program, put back into jail,had to spend two to three days depending on what typeof violation I committed.And then I was able to return back to the ROCK program.

    • 01:11

      CHRIS [continued]: I finished three months of work release.And I should say, it was one of the hardest parts of my life--to have to leave my home and spend every night in jailand go back to work as a functioning member of society

    • 01:32

      CHRIS [continued]: after leaving jail every night.So it was a difficult time.The next part of my sentence was whatthey call the home detention.And at that point in time, you'reable to spend nights at home, but youhave either an ankle monitoring device or, in my case,there was a time period that you had to check in.

    • 01:54

      CHRIS [continued]: And you had to be available to pick up the telephone--a landline-- within three to four minutes of them callingyou.So if you were not on location and youdidn't answer that phone, shortly afterwards policewould show up arrest you again.That was the home detention for the next three months.And that was also a pretty difficult time

    • 02:16

      CHRIS [continued]: because you have a sense of freedom,but you can't go shopping.You can't go out further past where a landline can'treach in your yard.It was very difficult to even go out to the garageand to perform any work if the phone didn't ring.

Driving While Intoxicated: Work Release

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Abstract

Chris Farias discusses his experiences with work release and home detention.

Driving While Intoxicated: Work Release

Chris Farias discusses his experiences with work release and home detention.

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