Criminal and Civil Cases

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    • 00:03

      SPEAKER: Well, criminal and civil casesare totally different.An acquittal, for example, a jurymight acquit a particular defendant,which is to say that a jury finds that defendant notguilty of a particular offense.That doesn't mean that this particular individual hasn't

    • 00:25

      SPEAKER [continued]: violated any laws.In criminal and civil cases, the burdens of proof are different.Generally, in criminal cases, the prosecution's burdenis to prove, beyond a reasonable doubt,that the defendant committed the acts or the crimes for which hewas charged.In a civil case, the burden is usually a little bit different.

    • 00:47

      SPEAKER [continued]: It's a lesser burden, often referredto as the preponderance of the evidence standard.And so it's very-- I don't want to say common,but it is conceivable that a defendantmight be acquitted in a criminal trial,but later found liable in a civil trialfor that same conduct.

    • 01:09

      SPEAKER [continued]: For example, you might recall the O.J. Simpsontrial of the 1990s, where Mr. Simpson was acquittedby a jury of murder, but in a separate proceeding,he was found civilly liable for the wrongful deathof the individual there.And so that's an example of someone

    • 01:29

      SPEAKER [continued]: who could be acquitted in a criminal setting,but then held liable in a civil setting.And one main difference with that is the consequence.An individual who's convicted of a crimefaces, in addition to fees, they say face jail time or prisontime.In the civil context, typically what is being sought

    • 01:51

      SPEAKER [continued]: is monetary damages.

Criminal and Civil Cases

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Abstract

Jeffrey Mason discusses the differences between criminal and civil cases. Highlights include acquittals and the burdens of proof.

Criminal and Civil Cases

Jeffrey Mason discusses the differences between criminal and civil cases. Highlights include acquittals and the burdens of proof.

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