Crime Theory

View Segments Segment :

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Embed
  • Link
  • Help
  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Embed
  • Link
  • Help
Successfully saved clip
Find all your clips in My Lists
Failed to save clip
  • Transcript
  • Transcript

    Auto-Scroll: ONOFF 
    • 00:00

      [Chapter Two, The Nature and Extent of Crime, Crime Theory]Professor Mary Dodge, Ph.D.: The theoretical perspectivethat crime happens in certain places developed outof the Chicago school, where they actually mapped crime.And then, more recently, Larry Shermanhas done studies about hot-spotting.So what this means is that we know that 3% of the addressesrepresent 50% of the calls for service in Minneapolis.

    • 00:24

      So what they did was take their patrol unitsand put them in those high crime areas.And what happened?Crime went down.The argument about hot-spotting, though,was that it displaced crimes.So we saw it moving out of the area, wherewe have high patrol, into different neighborhoods,but we now have research to suggest thisthat this does not happen.

    • 00:45

      Another theory that's important is opportunity theory.We can prevent crime through environmental design.And this is called target hardening.So if you look at a potential targetand think about how you can make that safer-- so for example,at your home.You look around your house and you think,well, I could put a rose bush under that window, which

    • 01:08

      would make it more difficult for a burglarto enter into my house.I can put sensor lights at night so Ican see what's happening outside, locks, of course,are common, and security cameras, now.It's also great to have a dog in your house.The most popular theoretical positionthat's been applied in the community

    • 01:29

      is called "Broken Windows."This was introduced by James Q. Wilson and George Kelling.And it actually came out in Atlantic Monthlyas a popular article.And what they argued was that in a neighborhood whereyou have one broken window and you let that go,it shows that nobody cares.And then you'll get more broken windows,

    • 01:50

      and the neighborhood will become a high crime place.It really is unchecked social disorder creates crime.So if we can do proactive policingand put police officers there to work with the communityand this is very closely involved with communitypolicing, let's work with the community

    • 02:10

      to make these neighborhoods look better and be safer.Unfortunately, sometimes broken windowsis associated with zero tolerance policing, whichcan work, but has probably a limited effect.New York City, for example, went outand wrote jaywalking tickets to everyoneto stop the jaywalking.

    • 02:30

      That was a zero tolerance policy, littering.And it was effective for a while.And last time I was in New York, it was not effective.But it can be looked at broken windows and quality of life.And that's community policing.

Crime Theory

View Segments Segment :

Abstract

Theories on crime and preventative tactics can yield positive results. Professor Mary Dodge demonstrates how theory can be applied effectively and how it can go awry.

Crime Theory

Theories on crime and preventative tactics can yield positive results. Professor Mary Dodge demonstrates how theory can be applied effectively and how it can go awry.

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website

Back to Top