Classical Cultural Criminology Theories of Crime & Deviance

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    • 00:00

      [MUSIC PLAYING][Classical Cultural Criminology Theories of Crime and Deviance]My name is Robert Donald Weide, and I'mthe professor of Criminology in the Department of Sociologyhere at California State University, Los Angeles.[Dr. Robert Donald Weide, Professor, Departmentof Sociology] This presentation I'll

    • 00:21

      be discussing classical cultural criminology perspectiveson crime and deviance.I'll be covering the following classical theoristsand their work in the developmentof cultural criminology.[Presentation Topics]First will be Dick Hebdige's conceptionof the inherent resistance embedded in subcultural style.Second will be Jeff Ferrell's conception of social control

    • 00:42

      and subcultural style.And finally, I'll finish with Mike Presdeeand the carnival of crime that perpetuates criminalization.It's important to understand classical proponentsof cultural criminology in order to appreciatethat criminal subcultures evolve in resistanceto the conventional social order.[Dick Hebdige:The Meaning of Style]

    • 01:05

      First, let's start with Dick Hebdige.Dick Hebdige suggested that subcultural styleconstitutes an unspoken resistanceto conventional society.Through the process of what he calls bricolage,members of subcultures co-opt material itemsfrom the mainstream culture and imbue themwith new and subculturally significant meanings.

    • 01:26

      Subcultural style operates this wayto disrupt mainstream society by displaying forbidden contentand/or forbidden forms of expression.By doing so, members of subculturesconsciously, or unconsciously, are challenging the hegemonyof the dominant culture by creating an alternative to it.[Jeff Ferrell:Subcultural Style and Social Control]

    • 01:51

      Next, let's discuss the work of Jeff Ferrell.Jeff Ferrell suggests that style isthe glue that holds subcultural groups togetheras distinct and meaningful categories.Style plays two principal roles in subcultures,according to Ferrell.First, style is the medium through whichsome cultural affiliation and identity are expressed

    • 02:12

      by members of a subculture.[Two Principle Roles of Style]A sense of belonging is establishedin being part of a particular aestheticand stylistic community that constituted a subculture.Second, style is used to communicate membershipin a particular criminalized subcultureby members of that subculture.But style is also used by law enforcement

    • 02:33

      to identify members of criminalize subculturesfor suppression.Ferrell points out that violence itself is alsoa very powerful stylistic symbol thatmany criminalized subcultures employ in order to establisha reputation to be feared.[Mike Presdee:The Carnival of Crime]

    • 02:54

      Finally, I'll conclude with Mike Presdee.Mike Presdee suggests that crime isa sort of carnival that celebrates resistanceto the dominant order.Even those who do not commit crimes themselves are quiteenjoy watching crime, violence, death, and humiliationoccur to other people, either on TV or the internet nowadays.

    • 03:15

      And the more real the observation,the more enthralled people are at viewing it.Both the perpetrators and observersof crimes get a thrill out of it because itis a momentary break in the social order that they feelis inherently oppressive.Crime is an act of transgression thatresists the terms of the current social order.Now I'd like to suggest some further reading in this area.

    • 03:39

      First is Dick Hebdige's classic book Subculture:The Meaning of Style.Next is Jeff Ferrell's chapter entitled"Style Matters" in his edited anthology Cultural CriminologyUnleashed.Finally, is Mike Presdee's classic bookCultural Criminology and the Carnival of Crime.

Classical Cultural Criminology Theories of Crime & Deviance

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Abstract

Professor Robert Weide reviews the work of three theorists who define crime as a willing component of subcultures. He describes perspectives that state crime can be an intentional challenge to social order and societal oppression.

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Classical Cultural Criminology Theories of Crime & Deviance

Professor Robert Weide reviews the work of three theorists who define crime as a willing component of subcultures. He describes perspectives that state crime can be an intentional challenge to social order and societal oppression.

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