Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms

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    • 00:00

      [Chapter 1.The Read/Write Web]

    • 00:28

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: About two years ago, Iwent to the Virginia Association of Independent Schoolsannual technology retreat, and Will Richardsonwas the keynote speaker.That weekend was really life changing for mebecause it changed how I teach.

    • 00:45

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think the implicationsof what's happening right now is huge,and we as educators collectively really needto get our brains around what it meansfor us as individual learners, but also then as practitionersand how we implement these things in our classroomas well.

    • 01:02

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I want my studentsto know that they can reach out anywhere in the world right nowand learn from someone else, that it's important for themto share their ideas, to be creative,to be innovative, to not expect me to give themall the answers.

    • 01:15

      WILL RICHARDSON: It's really self-directed.It's passion based.It's need to know.You have to be able to tap into the resourcesand know where you can turn when you have a question.For some people, that's Twitter maybe.For other people, it's on a blog,it's reading through wikis or whatever else.I think that we need to help kids understand and manage

    • 01:39

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: a different way of collecting information, assessinginformation, and using that information effectively.

    • 01:45

      DEBRA GARCIA: I remember I looked backat my old instructions from four years ago,and it had information on how to includea hyperlink into your document, whereas now, theyall know how to do that.The mitosis project I did for these guys was a stop animationfilm that they did themselves, right up to uploadon their computers.One, because the technology what they can do with their laptops,

    • 02:08

      DEBRA GARCIA [continued]: is just over four years.So that part of the technology has really taken off,and so there's some things I can do in herethat I really couldn't do even four years ago.

    • 02:20

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I have learned so muchfrom my students this year, and my lesson planshave changed because I try to open myself to their ideasso that we may veer off in another direction.

    • 02:32

      EMILY: If there is a word in English classthat I don't know the definition for,I can type into dictionary.com and have the definitionof that word in the blink of an eye.If there's, in AP government, a Supreme Court decision that Iam not familiar with, I type it into Wikipediaand I understand it just like that.Or in physics class, when we're learning about pitch, rather

    • 02:53

      EMILY [continued]: than just seeing a picture of a fire truck with its siren on,we can watch a YouTube video of a fire truckapproaching a person and then leaving a personand hear the pitch change as it passes by.In English class, we get to watch authors speak,

    • 03:15

      EMILY [continued]: so we get to know the author personally,rather than just through their writing.

    • 03:20

      MARY: I couldn't find research for a biology project one day,and my teacher said, I'll send out a Twitterand see if anyone has any ideas.And people respond back with articles from Australiaand from everywhere.

    • 03:33

      NATALIE: We had a Skype chat with a teacher in Canada,and she was reading our blog.She was responding to our stuff, and she actuallytalked to us face to face saying,this is a really good idea.If you explore this more, you could reallygo somewhere with this.And she was telling us about what she did,and we were telling her about we do.

    • 03:54

      NATALIE [continued]: It's really good how we can just spread ideas so easily.She's in Canada and we're here, and we were justtalking face to face.[Chapter 2.Weblogs: Pedogogy and Practice]

    • 04:13

      NARRATOR: In this DVD, we will visit Fredericksburg Academyin Fredericksburg, Virginia, a K-12 school thathas incorporated many Web 2.0 technologiesinto the curriculum.These technologies have empowered both studentsand teachers to reach outside the classroomand to better prepare for the challenges of the 21st century.

    • 04:33

      NARRATOR [continued]: A good place to start learning about Web 2.0 technologiesis learning to work with blogs.

    • 04:39

      TEACHER: If he ends up being online on the chat feature,because what we'll do is I'll just pop it up.

    • 04:44

      WILL RICHARDSON: Blogs are really the first readwrite technology that took root, and today we have,I think, about 160 million blogs out there somewhere.I really think that good bloggingis a real intellectual practice where you're reading widely,you're thinking, you're synthesizing ideas,and then you're sharing your own sense of those ideas

    • 05:05

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and saying, here's what I think.What do you think?It's writing that is meant literally to connect, notsimply to communicate.

    • 05:13

      MARY: I served as a page last yearfor the Virginia House of Delegates,and I did the vast majority of my workover the internet with my teachers emailing,and definitely through blogging.And I also blogged about my experienceso that people back home could comment and collaborateand just know what I was doing in Richmond.I was able to collaborate with my class

    • 05:35

      MARY [continued]: with the things I would normally do,and it was almost like I was still in the classbeing able to comment.

    • 05:41

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think there's no question that whenkids are writing about things that they care aboutand they're writing for real audiences,that that increases the relevance of the workthat they're doing.If we can use these online spacesas ways to provide audiences that sharean interest with the students and what they're writing about,

    • 06:01

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: that's a game changer in a lot of ways.

    • 06:03

      MARY: It was really neat to see their ideas comingfrom Fredericksburg, because I would be down thereand it was like I was in my own world,but they were right there with me through the internet.It's just such an instant access, rather thanthe fact that we were 60 miles away from each other.

    • 06:20

      WILL RICHARDSON: It kind of forcesyou to think about all those different eyes,all those different people that are out there, and how theywould react to it, how they would process it and thinkabout it, and it forces you to anticipatein many ways what their reactions might be.And just that thought process, I think,deepens the understanding of whatit is that you're creating, and then again,

    • 06:42

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: gives you the opportunity to get feedback and even morethinking back about that to deepen it even further.

    • 06:50

      NARRATOR: Will Richardson's book, Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts,and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms,has helped to revolutionize teachingin schools around the world.This DVD follows his book and shows these technologiesin action.Many people refer to these new web-based tools as Web 2.0

    • 07:10

      NARRATOR [continued]: because they greatly enhance whatcan be done with the internet.These new web tools offer teachers dramatic opportunitiesto bring the world into their classrooms.

    • 07:20

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think what the tools reallyprovide is an opportunity for teachers to connect kidsto audiences outside of the schoolor outside of the classroom, and it reallydoes expand the walls, or actually make the walls thin.

    • 07:33

      EMILY: My favorite thing about the blogis that when you type in my name to Google, the first thing thatpops up is the title of my senior exhibit,"Ingredients for Peace," and so rather than some humiliatingFacebook or MySpace pictures, rather than that popping up,people are able to get to know methrough my writing and my ideas and my experience.

    • 07:53

      EMILY [continued]: I've designed a cookbook from the coverto the back full of recipes from global peacemakers,and you can basically read everythingthat you would ever want to know about my project,and you get to know me through that.

    • 08:06

      WILL RICHARDSON: You'll find a lotof kids who are normally not very willing to writeor reticent in class to flourish in those environments,and then to really look at their writing in waysthat make a difference, make them really understandwriting and that process of writing in a different way.

    • 08:21

      NATALIE: Before this, writing was very private to me.Before I experienced the blogging and everythingon the internet, writing was very private to me.But with our blog, I could publish some of my writing,and I could get comments and feedback from different people.I got a comment from someone at the Universityof Mary Washington on my reactionto reading Frankenstein, and it really

    • 08:43

      NATALIE [continued]: showed me some of my ideas are good.I can make a point with my own writing,and it made me feel good about myself with my writing.

    • 08:54

      WILL RICHARDSON: We can bring the world into our classroomsif we choose to do so now, and it's not hard,and there are really not that many barriers to doing that.It takes vision, obviously, and it takes an understandingof what you can and can't do with blogs.But definitely, if we think of our classroomsas only being in one particular place

    • 09:14

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and having four walls that bind us in,then we're not really seeing the potentials of these toolsin terms of getting outside and havingconversations around the world.

    • 09:45

      NARRATOR: In this DVD, we will visit Fredericksburg Academyin Fredericksburg, Virginia, a private K-12 school thathas incorporated many Web 2.0 technologiesinto the curriculum.These technologies have empowered both studentsand teachers to reach outside the classroomand to better prepare for the challenges of the 21st century.

    • 10:06

      NARRATOR [continued]: A good place to start learning about Web 2.0 technologiesis learning to work with blogs.

    • 10:11

      TEACHER: If he ends up being online on the chat feature,because what we'll do is I'll just pop it up.

    • 10:17

      WILL RICHARDSON: Blogs are really the first readwrite technology that took root, and today we have,I think, about 160 million blogs out there somewhere.I really think that good bloggingis a real intellectual practice, where you're reading widely,you're thinking, you're synthesizing ideas,and then you're sharing your own sense of those ideas

    • 10:37

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and saying, here's what I think.What do you think?It's writing that is meant literally to connect, notsimply to communicate.

    • 10:45

      MARY: I served as a page last yearfor the Virginia House of Delegates,and I did the vast majority of my work over the internet,with my teachers emailing, and definitely through blogging.And I also blogged about my experienceso that people back home could comment and collaborate,and just know what I was doing in Richmond,and I was able to collaborate with my class

    • 11:07

      MARY [continued]: with the things I would normally do.It was almost like I was still in the classbeing able to comment.

    • 11:13

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think there's no question that whenkids are writing about things that they care aboutand they're writing for real audiences,that that increases the relevance of the workthat they're doing.If we can use these online spacesas ways to provide audiences that sharean interest with the students and what they're writing about,

    • 11:34

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: that's a game changer in a lot of ways.

    • 11:36

      MARY: It was really neat to see their ideas comingfrom Fredericksburg because I would be down thereand it was like I was in my own world,but they were right there with me through the internet,and it's just such an instant access, rather thanthe fact that we were 60 miles away from each other.

    • 11:52

      WILL RICHARDSON: It kind of forcesyou to think about all those different eyes,all those different people that are out there, and how theywould react to it, how they would process it and thinkabout it, and it forces you to anticipatein many ways what their reactions might be.And just that thought process, I think,deepens the understanding of whatit is that you're creating, and then again,

    • 12:15

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: gives you the opportunity to get feedback and even morethinking back about that to deepen it even further.

    • 12:23

      NARRATOR: Will Richardson's book, Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts,and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms,has helped to revolutionize teachingin schools around the world.This DVD follows his book and shows these technologiesin action.Many people refer to these new web-based tools as Web 2.0because they greatly enhance what

    • 12:44

      NARRATOR [continued]: can be done with the internet.These new web tools offer teachers dramatic opportunitiesto bring the world into their classroom.

    • 12:52

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think what the tools reallyprovide as an opportunity for teachersto connect kids to audiences outside of the schoolor outside of the classroom, and it reallydoes expand the walls, or actually make the walls thin.

    • 13:05

      EMILY: My favorite thing about the blogis that when you type in my name to Google, the first thing thatpops up is the title of my senior exhibit,"Ingredients for Peace."And so rather than some humiliating Facebook or MySpacepictures, rather than that popping up,people are able to get to know methrough my writing and my ideas and my experience.

    • 13:25

      EMILY [continued]: I've designed a cookbook from the coverto the back full of recipes from global peacemakers,and you can basically read everythingthat you would ever want to know about my project,and you get to know me through that.

    • 13:38

      WILL RICHARDSON: You'll find a lotof kids who are normally not very willing to writeor reticent in class to flourish in those environments,and then to really look at their writing in waysthat make a difference, make them really understandwriting and that process of writing in a different way.

    • 13:54

      NATALIE: Before this, writing was very private to me.Before I experienced the blogging and everythingon the internet, writing was very private to me,but with our blog, I could publish some of my writing,and I could get comments and feedback from different people.I got a comment from someone at the Universityof Mary Washington on my reactionto reading Frankenstein, and it really

    • 14:16

      NATALIE [continued]: showed me some of my ideas are good.I can make a point with my own writing.It made me feel good about myself with my writing.

    • 14:26

      WILL RICHARDSON: We can bring the world into our classroomsif we choose to do so now, and it's not hard,and there are really not that many barriers to doing that.It takes vision, obviously, and it takes an understandingof what you can and can't do with blogs.But definitely, if we think of our classroomsas only being in one particular place

    • 14:47

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and having four walls that bind us in,then we're not really seeing the potentials of these toolsin terms of getting outside and havingconversations around the world.[Chapter 3.Weblogs: Get Started!]

    • 15:02

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: As the instructional technologycoordinator here, I found that early on,before I had my own network and I was learning and sharingfrom others, I thought that if I just exposed teachersto the tools, that they would see immediate value for usingit in their class, and that they would.And what I discovered is that, of course,

    • 15:23

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: they were interested in using the tool,but because they didn't understand it fully,they would do it more because they wanted to support me.

    • 15:31

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: And we realized most from this yearthat our change as a group came actuallyto each of us individually.So we all came at this differently.Some of us had used technologies for years but others of usnot at all.

    • 15:44

      NARRATOR: Getting started with blogs in the classroomrests on an appreciation for whatthey can do for you as a teacher in your own life.

    • 15:50

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think the first thingthat a teacher should do if consideringusing web blogs in classrooms is to readother blogs around their passions.So find other people who share an interestand read those people's blogs.Then perhaps comment on those blogs.Then maybe the next step is to start his or her own blog

    • 16:12

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: about that particular topic and reallytry to capture what it is that they're experiencingfrom a learning standpoint.

    • 16:18

      DEBRA GARCIA: Susan started with a brownie recipe, I believe.Was that you?So totally not tech related, but it'sa way to get people linking in and going,hey I'll go to the personal one and drop in a recipe.

    • 16:31

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: I would advisethem to pursue it for themselves and nottry to incorporate things in the classroom immediately,and to begin to really develop their own online presence.That's been most useful for, me people finding methrough my blog and my wiki and juststarting conversations and sharing ideas.

    • 16:51

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS [continued]: That's the best way for me to find new ideasfor what I do in my classroom now.

    • 16:57

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: Once we see that value,once we learn through these collaborative methods,then we have our epiphanies and we say,I can have someone from Canada come inand speak to my students about their culture,or I can connect with this teacher in Malaysia.So absolutely, we need to understand and use those tools,and then we will understand this shift in society

    • 17:18

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: that we also talk about.We will understand what that means,and why our teenagers are texting so much,and why companies now are asking for peoplewho do indeed think outside the box.

    • 17:31

      WILL RICHARDSON: But basically, can youlearn anytime, anywhere?That is the reality of these guys' worldswhen they leave you, when they leave us,is that they're going to be learning anytime, anywhere.They're going to be hyper connected.They're going to be living in a hyper transparent world.Can they look to you as models for that type of learningand for that type of integration?

    • 17:55

      NARRATOR: As you become immersed in seeing what others have doneusing blogs and other Web 2.0 applications,it is time to get started.

    • 18:03

      WILL RICHARDSON: Blogs are reallyeasy to get started with.There are sites like Blogger.com,which is a Google application, or WordPress, where basically,it's as easy as sending an email.I mean, you go through a very quick setup process,you fill in basically a form with whatever itis that you want to share, and thenyou click the Publish button, and that's pretty much it.

    • 18:23

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: So the technical aspects of doing any of this,blogs included, they're really easy.But again, it's that connecting piece afterwardswhere the difficulty is, where you have to reallythink about it a little bit more and you have to understand howto do that with some sophisticationin order to really leverage it for the learning that'spossible in those connections.

    • 18:42

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: We give studentsa blog in middle school whenever they or their teachersare ready.We give them guidelines.We talk to them about appropriate commenting,about what a blog means, what it means to be online.And they use this blog, then, in all of their classes.So they don't have to create blogs nowfor English and blogs for history.So the students today were actuallygoing to a Fredericksburg Academy blog

    • 19:04

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: and working on an English assignment.When they finish it, they tag it with a labelthat I give them and it pulls into my class blog.If a history teacher wants them to blog about something,they tag that and it goes to the history blog.So they have one space where theycreate and work and think online.It's been a great organizing tool for the students.

    • 19:27

      DEBRA GARCIA: What we're going to do todayis take a look at Johnny's blog post about his surgerysince he can't be here.So pop up on his blog page and hehas links to the Taylor spatial frame, whichis what he has on his legs.

    • 19:40

      NARRATOR: In Debra's elective science class,one of her students has had an extended absencefor a surgical procedure.During his absence, he set up a blog for his classmates,allowing them to get a better understanding of the procedureand his perspective on the experience.

    • 19:56

      DEBRA GARCIA: I mean, when you look at one of these picturesup here, it's going into the skin, into the bone.

    • 20:02

      NARRATOR: The student has an orthopedic condition requiringthe use of a Taylor spatial frameto correct a curvature in his tibia.Deborah uses the class model of a skeletonto better explain the condition.

    • 20:14

      STUDENT: His fibula is smaller than the tibiaand they're supposed to be about equal.

    • 20:18

      DEBRA GARCIA: Yeah.So what's the fibula and the tibia?Is the tibia the shinbone and the fibula the back?So the tibia, is it this one?Somebody double check.

    • 20:27

      STUDENT: Yes.

    • 20:28

      DEBRA GARCIA: Yeah, that one, and then your fibulais this one.Which was shorter?

    • 20:32

      STUDENT: His tibia was shorter.

    • 20:34

      DEBRA GARCIA: Yeah.So imagine that being shorter.So what's the goal of the spatial frame?What's that supposed to do?Did anyone find the link, what itsays on there, what it's supposedto actually do for him?Should we watch the YouTube clip about it?

    • 20:48

      NARRATOR: The student located a YouTube clipon the internet about his surgery to share with his classand posted it on his blog.

    • 20:56

      WILL RICHARDSON: You go through that processand really get invested and blogsto some extent based around the thingsthat you're interested in.I think then you have a good starting pointto apply blogs in your classroom or to begin to use themin your classroom with really good pedagogybecause you understand, again, it'snot simply about publishing.It's about the connections that you make after you publish.It's those interactions where the real value in this is,

    • 21:18

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and it's hard to understand that if you're not interactingand connecting with other people in those contexts already.[Chapter 4.Wikis: Easy Collaboration for All]"Wiki," the word comes from Hawaiian meaning quick,and it was used by a guy by the name of Ward Cunningham who"invented," quote, unquote, wikis.

    • 21:39

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: And he used it because he just wanted that particular spaceto be someplace where they could come and updatequickly and share very easily.

    • 21:47

      NARRATOR: Most people who use the internet probably haveused Wikipedia and have some sense of what it represents.Searching on almost any topic results in a Wikipedia entry.This vast store of information has tremendous valueto educators.

    • 22:02

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think Wikipedia is probablyone of the most, if not the most important websitesthat teachers really need to understand right now, notnecessarily for what it is, but for what it represents,which is basically the collaborative constructionof truth.I mean, that's what people are attempting to capture there.Wikipedia's goal is to be the sum of human knowledge online.

    • 22:23

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: So you can imagine the potential for that.A lot of people have problems with Wikipediabecause anyone can edit anything, pretty much,and certainly that means that there are going to be errors,there's going to be vandalism, thereare going to be lies that are added.But the reality of it is that most studies now-- in fact,just about all the studies show-- that Wikipedia

    • 22:45

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: is as accurate or reliable as most other sources,primarily because it is without question the mostcurrent information that you're going to find in any one place.If you look at any disaster, if youlook at any type of major news event,watch the entry at Wikipedia growand you'll understand why it is as powerful as it is.

    • 23:07

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: Now, the problem with Wikipedia more than anything else,I think, is the writing.You can imagine what it's like whenyou get 1,000 people trying to writeone particular entry anywhere.The writing is not going to be great.But from a background standpoint and from a factual standpoint,Wikipedia is actually pretty accurate,and it is a site that our kids are using.

    • 23:30

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: There's no question about it.They go home.They look at Wikipedia first.Many of them stop there, and that's not a great thing.I think Wikipedia is a good startingpoint for their research.It's a place where they can go and get some linksand get some context for what it is that they're looking for,but we should teach kids to always verifywhat they find online, whether it'son Wikipedia or anywhere else.That's just a part of being a good editor of information

    • 23:52

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: these days.

    • 23:53

      NARRATOR: The way Wikipedia is constructed,where each article has many authors,can have powerful implications for teachers.Students can collaborate on writing a paperand make their contributions in classor at their own convenience.The progress of each group's collaborationcan be monitored by the teacher.

    • 24:13

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I have my entire course organizedon a wiki so that when students come to class,they immediately open their laptopsand they go to the wiki site.I have links on the left hand side of the wikito indicate whatever unit we're in.So they clicked on the poetry unit and went to the pagewhere I have assignments posted.Sometimes I'll include videos of the author perhaps reciting

    • 24:34

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: the poem or someone speaking about poetry in general.

    • 24:38

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: So in this first part,you're going to examine the concepts and analyze.Go look into the book.You need to find some good quotes, and really try to--

    • 24:47

      NARRATOR: Jennifer is using wikisin this class for a unit on Wuthering Heights.

    • 24:53

      STUDENT: She doesn't really want to be with him anymore,but she can't change it now because then she'snot accepted in society.

    • 25:01

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: Well, I took the traditional literaturecircle idea where students work independently in a small group.They may be studying different booksor they may be studying the same book,but really just working with each otherthroughout the entire novel.And I just put that work on a wiki.So they had to post their homework to the wiki.They would come in with their group, share ideas in a group

    • 25:23

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS [continued]: discussion, but put their notes on the wiki.So I had access to it all the time.Other members of their group, maybe somebodywas absent one day, but you could stillsee that person's work, so wouldn'tbe fully absent from the class discussion.You can make bullet points so that other people canread it and understand what you guys came up with.

    • 25:41

      STUDENT: OK.

    • 25:42

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: OK.I find the collaborative approachto be particularly valuable with this class.They tend to be quieter and shyer in a whole groupdiscussion, but if they can work with a small group or onepartner, they're more willing to share their ideas.And so I have them do a little small group work

    • 26:03

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS [continued]: but then post it to the bigger forumso that everybody can see it and learn from it.

    • 26:09

      PAIGE: Rather than writing a report at the end,it keeps me with it throughout the entire bookso I really understand every chapter that we've read,and that if I don't, I can look at someone else's, or I cancomment on other people's if they don't understand.So it's more of an intertwined readingthroughout the whole grade.

    • 26:29

      PAIGE [continued]: [Chapter 5.

    • 26:29

      RSS: The New Killer App for Educators]

    • 26:31

      NARRATOR: RSS, or Really Simple Syndication,provides users with a method of gathering togetherall the information that interests theminto a personalized page called a reader.Once an RSS reader is set up, RSS feedscan be added quickly and easily, offering the user many optionsfor organizing and sharing the information.

    • 26:52

      WILL RICHARDSON: RSS feeds are probablythe most technical of all these tools, but they are, I think,the most powerful of all in termsof building these networks and making these connections.They allow you to subscribe to digital contentso that I can get information coming my way.I don't have to continually go out and look for it.And in doing that, I can access a lot more information,

    • 27:16

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: I can process a lot more information,and I can really mine that for relevance and for connections,then, to see who's writing the most relevant, interestingstuff and to then interact with those people.

    • 27:29

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: The RSS feed actuallyis the code that you pull from the various sites,and you can pull it into any reader.Google Reader happens to be one.Bloglines is another.We're trying to not complicate their livesby saying try this, try this, so we introduced themto Google Reader because we use Google Docs.We use a lot of the Google applications.But it is a reader for RSS feeds,

    • 27:50

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: and the feed is the code that pulls the page into the reader.It's a way of organizing and managing.

    • 27:57

      NARRATOR: If you are already using the internetto gather news, information, and course materialsthrough newspaper websites, blogs, and podcasts,RSS is a simple way to make one website your single source.

    • 28:09

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I had the studentscreate a site in Google Reader.It allows them to pull information to them,as opposed to always going out to find information.When they were doing research for their pro/con papers,for example, their controversial issue papers,they could do a Google alert on a certain topic.What is the current stem cell research?

    • 28:30

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: They could do the alert and then grab the RSS feedand pull it into their Google Reader.So instead of constantly trying to go to various newspapersor news sites to find the current information,it pulled in right to them.

    • 28:41

      NARRATOR: Using Susan's example, let'screate an RSS feed on stem cell research.A good way to begin may be to search on stem cells NYT.An article from the New York Times comes up.If we scroll down the page, we see the RSS logo,indicating that the New York Times provides an RSS

    • 29:02

      NARRATOR [continued]: feed on stem cell topics.Copy the URL and then click back onto your Google Reader page.Click on Subscribe, and paste the URL into the box.Click Add, and you will notice that you now have a stem cellarticle feed from the New York Times.

    • 29:24

      NARRATOR [continued]: If any new articles are published,you will automatically receive them.Now, let's click on the feed to seewhich articles are available now.We can star the ones that seem to bemost applicable to the pro/con paper.These articles are now stored in the Starred Itemssection of your Google Reader page.

    • 29:44

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: The blogs that theydo in class, they take the RSS feed from the blogsand they have it in their Google Reader.So instead of going to everyone's blog,they're simply staying on that same pageand they're able to manage that information.It's a wonderful resource for me.I use two things religiously now in my life and in my teaching.One is Twitter and one is my Google Reader.

    • 30:06

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: [Chapter 6.The Social Web: Learning Together]

    • 30:12

      NARRATOR: Making connections is what Web 2.0 is all about.Many teachers are finding that Twitter is a great wayto get advice quickly and to see what their colleagues aredoing.By following a select group of educators you respect,they often will also choose to follow you,and then others tend to join in along the way.

    • 30:32

      NARRATOR [continued]: Soon, you have your own select communityof people with shared interests and knowledge.

    • 30:37

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: I can throw out a question in Twitterand get an answer.I think about a week ago, I wanted to create a chatroom onenight for my students, and we didn'thave any groundwork for that, and so I just asked on Twitter,does anybody know of a good, free chatroomthat I could set up?And I got responses within a couple of hours,

    • 30:57

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS [continued]: and I set it up, and they did it for homework.

    • 31:00

      NARRATOR: Unlike blogging, which is primarilya single author and unlimited in length,Twitter is more a conversation with each entry limitedto 140 characters.Users learn a few brief tools to make their tweets fitinto this restriction.For example, if they find a website they want to pass on,

    • 31:22

      NARRATOR [continued]: they can copy the URL and create a shorter URLby going to the Tiny URL site and pasting it.Tiny URL will create an abbreviated URLto use in your tweet.You can also copy other tweets and re-tweet them

    • 31:42

      NARRATOR [continued]: for your followers if you see somethingyou like on another person's page.

    • 31:46

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS: I have maybe about 100 peoplewho follow my Twitter account.Mostly what I talk about on Twitter or on my blogis completely professional ideas about teaching.It's similar to blogging except it's much shorter.You could just leave a quick messageand throw it out there, really, and whoever hears it,just like on a blog, whoever might find it on your blog.

    • 32:06

      JENNIFER CLARK EVANS [continued]: I actually publicize when I write a new blog post,I tell it on my Twitter account.I say, here's a new blog post, and thenpeople pass it on from there.I wrote one and Will passed it on to his gazillion followers,so that made me feel really good.

    • 32:23

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I know, Erica, youwere saying at some point, you had a question on your blog.Feel free any of you to come up and lookat what some of the other studentshave done as you post your reflectionsand your annotations.

    • 32:34

      NARRATOR: As you explore and share what you find on the web,the volume of information becomesdifficult to organize and keep concise.Luckily, social bookmarking tools such as Diigohave been developed to assist youin making this job more manageable.Signing up for Diigo allows you to place a menu lineat the top of your browser, which gives you the capability

    • 32:55

      NARRATOR [continued]: to highlight lines you want to call attention to.Here, a line in Wikipedia is highlightedand a comment is posted.Susan is using Diigo in her ninth grade English classto help her students discuss the poem "Pumpernickel"

    • 33:15

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: Today's studentswere doing several things, actually.I had them in small groups.Some students went to a site whereI had saved the poem "Pumpernickel" to a site calledDiigo, which is a social bookmarking tool,so they were able to annotate, this is a symbol of something,or this is a metaphor, or this is a powerful line.

    • 33:34

      LIZ: If you look here, you can see commentsthat other people have made.You highlight a line and you say a comment,and you can see all the other commentspeople have made about it.

    • 33:44

      SIMONE: My friend Liz actually just annotatedon the same line that I did, the last line,"I tell you why we must risk everythingfor the raw recipe of our passion."She had a similar interest in the line, how it comes togetherand the meaning of the poem really comes togetherat the end.That was probably my favorite line in this poem.I took lines that really stuck out

    • 34:06

      SIMONE [continued]: to me, that really meant something to me, that I feltI could describe to other people and have interactions.It feels better to be able to discussthe poem with other people and get their outlook on itand what they thought of it and see if you reallyhave similar interests in those same linesand things like that.It's really good to be able to annotatebecause I feel like you get a better understanding of what

    • 34:27

      SIMONE [continued]: you're reading.

    • 34:28

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: What's reallyexciting about this tool, though-- because theycould do that in a notebook, theycould have it on a piece of paper and be writing--is that their annotations are visible to anyonein this ninth grade group.And so the other students were watchingas their friends were sharing their comments online.They could either then comment on another line of the poem

    • 34:48

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: or they could respond to something a friend had said.

    • 34:51

      SIMONE: I annotated here that I love the ending of the poembecause it really tied together.Typically, you would think of a short story or a novelto have a really strong moral in the ending,but I feel like basically, this is saying that if you reallyhave a passion for something, you should reallygo out and do it and do whatever you have to do to get there.So that's what I liked about this poem.

    • 35:11

      LIZ: I think this is a little more helpful in a waybecause when you're typing it, itseems more like you can think about it a little morethan just having a discussion, and everyonefeels comfortable with sharing when it's notjust an open discussion because everyonegets to say what they think.

    • 35:28

      SIMONE: While reading other people's, youfeel like you really understand what they're reading.You might pick up something from them.It's just a really different way of having a discussion.

    • 35:40

      STUDENT: It's a reference to Yeats's beliefthat each human mind is linked to a single vast intelligenceand that this intelligence causescertain universal symbols to appear in individual minds.

    • 35:50

      NARRATOR: New Web 2.0 tools are being developed all the time.Susanne is using a Ning to allow her studentsto work together inside and outside class on the ChinuaAchebe book Things Fall Apart.She has set up the Ning and uses it to structure her class,providing resources, student blogs, and links.Similar to Susan's class, her students

    • 36:11

      NARRATOR [continued]: are also annotating their work.

    • 36:13

      SUSANNE NOBLES: You just pick a Ning.You can set up your own themes, and then youhave to choose what features you want on it.And so I think one of the things thathelped me was that I had been involved in a Ning myselfand knew the kind of features that worked and madesense for what I wanted to do.And so you have to decide if you want discussion groupsor forums and individual blogs.

    • 36:33

      SUSANNE NOBLES [continued]: So I set up the basic features and thenthe students come on and set up their own pages,and then at that point, they had their own blogs to write,as well as groups to join.

    • 36:44

      STUDENT: I think it's like everything's bad, so he's like,surely the second coming is there.It's going to happen.

    • 36:50

      STUDENT: Is it coming, or is it--

    • 36:53

      NARRATOR: Students immediately see the advantagesto using social networking in the classroom.

    • 36:57

      CARMEN: From this, you learn to work with other people,because in life, you're going to haveto work with other people on projectsand you're not always going to be doing things by yourself.You learn to take other ideas for what they are.Instead of rejecting and saying that they're not your ideas,you are able to learn from other people, ultimately.

    • 37:16

      NARRATOR: The title of Achebe's bookcomes from a line in the William Butler Yeats poem "The SecondComing."

    • 37:21

      SUSANNE NOBLES: We started out with the poem in a Worddocument, and they were working through doingsome annotations of the poem to get an individual understandingby working in a group.So there's one person taking their notes in the Ningwhile the others were just lookingat the poem making different annotations.And then after that, they read the commentsand then responded to each other's comments

    • 37:43

      SUSANNE NOBLES [continued]: about how they felt the poem then tied into the novelbased on what they had thought through about the poem.

    • 37:50

      NARRATOR: During this project, the studentswere able to work outside of class on their own schedulebut still be able to read the work of their classmates.

    • 37:58

      CARMEN: Anytime that you get helpfrom other students, new ideas come up,so that in itself is helpful.But being able to go on the internet and post your paperand then have other people access itfrom wherever they are just makesit a lot easier to get those assignments doneand easier for people to collaborate in general.

    • 38:18

      SUSANNE NOBLES: One of the thingswe're emphasizing this year is that thereare multiple interpretations to things,and while you certainly can be wrong if you misread somethingin its entirety, there is not a singular right answer,so that they can see what other groups didand make that understanding that sometimes itconnects and sometimes it doesn't with whatthey had done.

    • 38:38

      STUDENT: If you're just having a conversation,you can forget parts of it.You don't go back to it for awhileand it's completely gone, whereas if it'styped up in there and saved there, no matter what,you can always look back to it and itwill jog your memory about what you were doingand what you had to say.

    • 38:52

      SUSANNE NOBLES: When you write something down,it just cements it in your brain, and so the factthat they had to write out their thoughts and think through themand have that outside pressure of makingtheir thoughts clear so that someone they didn't knowdidn't misunderstand them emphasized that as well.

    • 39:08

      CARMEN: It's a lot more helpful to beable to talk about things rather than just reading themon my own because I don't always understand things right away.And so being able to go home and talk to my friendson a discussion about a book or a poemhelps a lot because normally at home,I wouldn't be able to talk to my classmates all at once,

    • 39:29

      CARMEN [continued]: but this enables us to do that.

    • 39:32

      SUSANNE NOBLES: When they got to the end, they said, wow.This was great.And they actually wanted to know if theycould quote each other in their papers.And I said, absolutely.You need to give credit where credit's dueand talk about where it's from, but if you got a great ideafrom this person's post, then that's what you put in there,and you quote that and talk about that.

    • 39:52

      NARRATOR: Susanne drew in some college studentsfrom New Jersey to read and commenton the students' writing, adding another level to the social webexperience and breaking down the walls of the classroom.

    • 40:02

      SUSANNE NOBLES: When the very first New Jerseycomments went on there, my students came into classand they were basically like this.And I said, what did you do?And they said, wow, but they werecommenting on what we said.And I said, well, what do you think?And they're like, well, I'm not sure I agree with them.And I said, then tell them that.And it was a fascinating thing to have that moment where

    • 40:25

      SUSANNE NOBLES [continued]: we could talk about what their thoughts were,and they were feeling pushed but weren't sure what to say back.And I said, go on.And then we actually spent some time at the end of that class.I said, go on.Those of you that got comments back, write back to themand engage in that dialogue.They're students just like you.They're just in another place.So that was very powerful for my students,

    • 40:48

      SUSANNE NOBLES [continued]: and I know from that college professor very powerfulfor her students.A few of them wrote to me specificallyand said that they got more out of interactingwith my students on the Ning than in the classroomobservations they had done up to that pointbecause they could be more interactive.Instead of sitting in a room watching,they could really interact.

    • 41:09

      SUSANNE NOBLES [continued]: [Chapter 7.Fun with Flickr: Creating, Publishing,and Using Images Online]

    • 41:14

      MICHELLE REDDING: You've gotten your photos all uploaded.Is that correct?

    • 41:17

      STUDENTS: Yes.

    • 41:18

      MICHELLE REDDING: OK.And have you finished your Word documentwith what you're going to say for each one?

    • 41:22

      STUDENTS: Yes.

    • 41:24

      WILL RICHARDSON: Well, Flickr and other online photo sharingsites like that are pretty amazing.There are now over a million photosuploaded every day to Flickr.What you can use Flickr for is not only a place to archiveyour own personal photos, but to,again, share some really interesting work

    • 41:44

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and some really interesting thinking and conversations.What makes Flickr social is that you can commenton other photos, and from a digital storytellingstandpoint, if you want to look for images that reallyaccentuate the ideas that you're talking about,places like Flickr are just great resources for that.

    • 42:02

      NARRATOR: Students can use the vast store of images on Flickrto illustrate stories or document a paper.Using images from this video, a paperon technology in the classroom is written.Although Flickr photos are copyrighted,many images are classified Creative Commonsand allow Flickr subscribers to use the imagesfor non-commercial purposes.

    • 42:24

      HIRAM CUEVAS: I was trying to figure out a way for usto document the experience and alsoshare the experience with the group.

    • 42:34

      NARRATOR: Hiram was taking part in Will's workshopand decided to experiment with usingFlickr to document a bike trip.Using a smartphone, he took pictures, annotated themon Flickr, and posted them so that otherscould share his experience.He used this trip to demonstrate the power of social mediausing digital photos.Later, this became a model for creating digital field trips

    • 42:56

      NARRATOR [continued]: with students.Using his phone, Hiram was able to post tweets of this trip.

    • 43:01

      HIRAM CUEVAS: It was a five and a half hour journey.We did get some comments via Twitterfrom various people who started following us.And when we got home, we did have the nice library of photosthat was already in place up in Flickrshould something happen to the phone or what have you.

    • 43:20

      NARRATOR: Using Hiram's concept of a digital tour,let's create a mural tour of Philadelphia,adding a map feature to geotag the pictures.Here, a series of photographs of murals in Philadelphiahas been uploaded into Flickr.By going into Organizer and choosing the Map function,you have the opportunity to geotag your photos.

    • 43:41

      NARRATOR [continued]: The pictures can be located on a mapjust by dragging and dropping them in the correct location.The picture has the location information,which is represented by a blue dot on the map.You can annotate your images to make the tour a moreeducational experience.

    • 44:03

      NARRATOR [continued]: Any viewer can now mouse over the location dotsand take this mural tour of Philadelphia.There are also applications that work with digital imagesto create all kinds of graphics quickly and easily.This is the Big Huge Labs website.

    • 44:25

      NARRATOR [continued]: This site makes it easy to use your photosto create many customized products.Let's make a magazine cover.We enter the title and subtitle, select colors,and upload a picture.Here, we will upload a picture of Mary, who served as a page.Once you have selected all your options,you press Create at the bottom of the page,

    • 44:47

      NARRATOR [continued]: and the magazine cover appears.Students enjoyed being able to make their papersappear more professional using these tools.You can also create badges for presentations, class calendars,frame your photos, and create motivational posters.These are just a few examples of how

    • 45:08

      NARRATOR [continued]: you could use these applications in the classroom.How about using a cartoon bubble to make a point?Flickr and digital photography aremaking it increasingly easy for even beginning photographersto do extraordinary things.[Chapter 8.Podcasting, Video, and Screencasting, Live Streaming:Multimedia Publishing for the Masses]

    • 45:29

      TEACHER: You're going to make the movie about the reef,and you know you're going to pick a hero, and who else?Who can remember?

    • 45:37

      STUDENT: Antagonist.

    • 45:38

      TEACHER: An antagonist.Exactly.So what's "antagonist" mean, guys?

    • 45:41

      STUDENT: Bad guy.

    • 45:42

      TEACHER: A bad guy.Absolutely.So it gives you all the information.

    • 45:48

      NARRATOR: At Fredericksburg Academy's fourth grade computerclass, students begin to learn the conceptsbehind video production using an editing program on Chicago'sShedd Aquarium website.The Amazing Reef gives students the opportunityto create animated characters and edit togethera short video.

    • 46:07

      TEACHER: Does anybody need any help,or are we all making our fantastic movies?

    • 46:12

      NARRATOR: As students grow older,they begin to develop audio and video podcasts.In the middle school, students areusing a program called VoiceThreadto create audio programs that include images.

    • 46:24

      STUDENT: Here's a good question.Do you like LEGOs, or have you even heard of them before?If not, get with the program.

    • 46:32

      WILL RICHARDSON: Very easy now to createyour own amateur radio show and post that uponline so that other people can consume it and listen to it.A lot of elementary school classroomsare using podcasting.Kids love to record and to publish in that way.

    • 46:48

      MICHELLE REDDING: Today, we're working in an introductoryto technology class, and we are working on the VoiceThreadprogram.And in this program, the studentswill learn how to create a VoiceThreadon any particular subject, which we tell themthey can go out and use in their classrooms.

    • 47:05

      STUDENT: I love our computer and all, and this is only halfof it, you know.But when it gets overcrowded with students,it's really hard to work, especially when people talk,which I don't do.

    • 47:15

      STUDENT: Is it possible to build a tower this highor is just a doctored photo?I think it's real.

    • 47:23

      NARRATOR: These students created an audio track with imagesin their computer technology class.They have chosen a topic that interests them,written a script, and found or createdimages for their program.

    • 47:35

      MICHELLE REDDING: This has been particularly helpfulwith foreign language classes because they are actuallyusing it to speak in the languagesthat they're learning.But this program will allow them to use voiceor they can also comment through the keyboard.

    • 47:49

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: We use podcastingin a variety of ways.In my eighth grade English class,I had students create podcasts for vocabulary wordswhere they would have to act out in some funny waythe definition of a word, find the definition.I even had them go to the Latin teacher to find the root,and then they would create a little podcast

    • 48:10

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: that others could listen to about the vocabulary.

    • 48:12

      STUDENT: My vocabulary word is "ostracize."It means to exclude or keep out of a group.

    • 48:19

      STUDENT: Dictionary.reference.com saysit is--

    • 48:21

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: In class today,students were actually reciting their poems online.One poem was one that they had written,and another was a poem created by an author.

    • 48:31

      STUDENT: "I Wish," a poem by English 9.2.I wish people could live as me.I wish that I could be a river that flows easily.I wish that everyone--

    • 48:42

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I really think it's valuable for themto have to recite.We talk about tone in poems.We talk about the rhyme scheme.We talk about the cadence.And so by them having to actually recite it and recordit, they have to first of all be able to understand the poem.Then, by uploading it to our wiki space,other students can come and listen to them,

    • 49:03

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: see what their interpretation is.It was very interesting when we read a poem recentlybecause their interpretation and their initial reading wasso very different from the author's.So they read it and recorded it, and thenI played the author's version, and they were sotaken aback because of where she emphasized certain wordsand where her line breaks were.So thought that was a valuable tool for them.

    • 49:24

      STUDENT: Popcorn leaps, popping from the floorof a hot, black skillet and into my mouth.Black words leap, snapping--

    • 49:32

      MAYA ANGELOU: Popcorn leaps, poppingfrom the floor of a hot, black skillet.

    • 49:38

      STUDENT: Archipelagos.

    • 49:40

      STUDENT: There's archipelagos, yes.Malaysia archipelago and Indonesia archipelago.

    • 49:44

      STUDENT: Did we say the Himalayas?

    • 49:46

      NARRATOR: Carey, a middle school geography teacher,used social networking tools to connect with a Canadian teachereducation student working in Malaysia.Using YouTube, she was able to createa dialogue between her students and studentson the other side of the globe.

    • 50:01

      CAREY POHANKA: When we talk to the people in Malaysia,we watched this video, and in it, they actuallytalk about the climate at the beginning.I got in contact with a professor in Canadawho wanted to have students of his thatare education students connect with classrooms,either by blogging or something like that.

    • 50:22

      CAREY POHANKA [continued]: And I got picked to have the student thatwas in Malaysia, who is a Canadian studying abroadin Malaysia.Did you hear what she said?

    • 50:29

      STUDENT: They have two seasons, wet and hot.

    • 50:31

      CAREY POHANKA: Wet and hot.So they have two seasons, wet and hot, and they have--So he and I connected and decidedwhat we wanted to do in my class.We threw out a lot of ideas, and thenhe finally came up with the idea of doing Did You Know videos.And so that video that we were looking at in class todayis the video that he made with the students in Malaysia

    • 50:53

      CAREY POHANKA [continued]: that he was working with.OK.So they wake up at 5:00.Why do you think they wake up so early?

    • 51:09

      STUDENT: It's very hot and humid.

    • 51:10

      CAREY POHANKA: Hot and humid, right?Do you remember me telling you the story about whenI was talking to Mr. Jackson on Skype,and he forgot that it was going to be on cameraand he wasn't wearing a shirt?Do you remember me telling you that?Why wasn't he wearing a shirt?

    • 51:22

      STUDENT: Because it was so hot.

    • 51:23

      CAREY POHANKA: Because it was so hot, right?Now, this is actually where he stayed.What can you tell from that area?Nick?

    • 51:31

      STUDENT: It's more populous than the schoolwhere they filmed the movie.

    • 51:35

      CAREY POHANKA: Yeah.It's much more populous, right?What does it look like?

    • 51:39

      STUDENT: A city.

    • 51:40

      CAREY POHANKA: A city, right?It looks like a city.But if we go over to where his school was-- and I don't know,distance wise, how he got there all the time and stuff,but what does this area look like?

    • 51:51

      STUDENT: It's very rural.

    • 51:52

      STUDENT: Farmland.

    • 51:53

      STUDENT: It looks very foresty.

    • 51:54

      CAREY POHANKA: Yeah.It looks like a rainforest.Perfect.And when we think of Malaysia, we just think maybe one thing.We don't think about it having different aspects of it.I use Google Earth a lot in my classbecause it gives them a sense of gettingto see it from the big picture and thennarrow in to the smaller picture.Today, I was able to show them how one part of Malaysia

    • 52:15

      CAREY POHANKA [continued]: is a city and very grown up and industrialized,and then there's another part whereyou could tell that it was mostly just rainforest.I don't know, before Google Earth,how a geography teacher would havedone that, to be honest with you.Thankfully, I haven't been teaching geography long enoughto know.

    • 52:31

      WILL RICHARDSON: I don't think there'sany question that video is a powerful way to communicateand one that captures our kids' imaginations more than textthese days.

    • 52:44

      STUDENT: We made one in science class, whichwe might end up posting on YouTube.We haven't posted any yet.It was about cell mitosis.It was kind of like claymation, sort of.

    • 52:55

      STUDENT: The cell cycle is broken down into three stages.The first stage of the cell cycleis called the interphase, and the interphase--

    • 53:02

      STUDENT: My group certainly focused a loton making the movie, but it was because we had to research itfirst, put all the information in the movie.It was actually really fun to learn that way.It was definitely different and moreinteresting than taking notes in class, I think.All the laptops came with Premiere.It's a movie making software, and it's really simple to useand it's lot of fun.

    • 53:21

      STUDENT: In order to split the cytoplasm,it is pinched and contracted, this arrow being calledthe furrow, and the cell is split in half.For plant cells, pinching is not involved,but instead, the formation called a cell plate.

    • 53:32

      STUDENT: Before the exam, I can just pull the movie back upand watch it again, so more interestingreviewing notes, too.

    • 53:41

      NARRATOR: On this DVD are several examplesof another podcasting tool called screencasting.Using a screen capture program such as Jing,a student or teacher can produce a videowhich captures whatever you are doing on the computer screen.You can also record audio narrationto go with this program if you have a microphone hooked upto your computer.

    • 54:02

      NARRATOR [continued]: This is an excellent way to demonstrate how to use softwareor to do other types of demonstrations.

    • 54:09

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think with video, and to some extent audioproduction and using these tools,they are the most time intensive if you want to do it well.I think one of the things, even though thereare about a quarter million YouTube videosbeing uploaded every day now, the vast majority of thoseare not really very good, and it'sbecause people haven't really taken the time to edit,

    • 54:29

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: to think about it, to storyboard, to gothrough a process of really creating something thathas some real relevance and some rigor in it, so that's our job.It's our job to really understandhow kids write in multimedia, but how they write wellin multimedia.That's not to say we do video at the expense of text,but we'd better do video because that, in many ways,

    • 54:50

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: is going to be an important communication tool for them.[Chapter 9.What It All Means]

    • 55:22

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: So there's a book called Here Comes Everybody wherethe author, Clay Shirky, says that what'shappening at this moment is a tectonic shift,and that basically, the ways in whichthese particular technologies allow us to connect and allowus to form groups and collaborate and actcollectively to change the world, bothon a local or global scale, is really

    • 55:44

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: unprecedented and extremely powerful,and yet not well understood at this moment.We're in a very messy period right now wherepolitical organizations are beginningto understand social networking, businessesare beginning to understand it and that theyneed to follow conversations that peopleare having about their products.

    • 56:04

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: Journalism and media are beginningto understand it because obviously, theycan't compete in a world where everyone has basicallyaccess to creating their own newspapersor to publishing their own pictures.So all of those entities have to change right now becauseof this shift, and I think that that'sabsolutely true for education as well.We're not going to be immune to what's happening here,

    • 56:25

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and the sooner we try to figure out or at least getsome sense of what these shifts meanin terms of learning, the better.

    • 56:32

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I don't learn alone.I learn with colleagues from around the world,and whether it's on Twitter and it's something very quickand to the point, or whether it's a response to a blogthat I've written, I may have questions.And then colleagues will come in and say,have you considered this, or in my class, I've tried this,

    • 56:54

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: or even if it's just support for an idea that I have.I can't even imagine not learning through my network.

    • 57:03

      NARRATOR: Blogs, wikis, Nings, and other social websiteshave similar features and continueto converge on what they can do.A Ning has made it simple to add videos, music,and create a password protected community.However, you can add some of these featuresto blogs, wikis, or a Flickr account.The bottom line is everything is becomingmore powerful and easier to use.

    • 57:26

      NARRATOR [continued]: As Web 2.0 develops, look to YouTubefor updated and detailed explanationsof how to use these tools.

    • 57:33

      MARY: Miss Carter Morgan has done wonderful jobincorporating that in the classroom,and all my classes-- math, Spanish,classes you wouldn't assume have technology integratedin the curriculum do have technology.I was actually talking to my mom.I said, Mom, if there's something that interests you,there are people out there writing about it online.She said, I just don't see the value in that.

    • 57:56

      MARY [continued]: If I know about something, how does that help me at all?I think my jaw hit the floor because she didn't understandthat you could collaborate through the internetand what value I have come to realize it has.

    • 58:11

      NARRATOR: To purchase additional copies of Blogs, Wikis,Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms,or to learn more about other products from Corwin Press,please visit our website at corwinpress.com,or call 800-233-9936.Will Richardson can also be booked for additional training

    • 58:32

      NARRATOR [continued]: through the Corwin Press Speakers' Bureau.

    • 59:03

      EMILY: With my laptop, I'm able to take notesreally fast and in an organized way,and if they're not really organized,then I have them at least jotted downso I can go back and format them in a Word document the waythat I want to.If there is a word in English classthat I don't know the definition for,I can type into dictionary.com and have the definitionof that word in the blink of an eye.

    • 59:23

      EMILY [continued]: If there is, in AP government, a Supreme Court decision that Iam not familiar with, I type it into Wikipediaand I understand it just like that.Or in physics class, when we're learning about pitch, ratherthan just seeing a picture of a fire truck with its siren on,we can watch a YouTube video of a fire truck

    • 59:46

      EMILY [continued]: approaching a person and then leaving a personand hear the pitch change as it passes by.In English class, we get to watch authors speak.So we get to know the author personally, rather thanjust through their writing.

    • 01:00:02

      MAYA ANGELOU: Popcorn leaps.

    • 01:00:04

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: We spent quite a long time talkingabout the guidelines that we wanted for our students here.We did not want to simply put themonline without talking to them about the ramifications,and so we've created a set of guidelines.And in middle school, for example,they are only using initials.We also tag their login username with the year

    • 01:00:26

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: that they will graduate because we have some studentswith the same initials, so that's a way we identify them.So a student might be KP, and thenwe use FA for Fredericksburg Academy,and the year they're going to graduate.So it might be KPFA12, for example.They're not allowed to put pictures of themselvesor any personal references that are identifiable,and we actually do that through the 10th grade.But starting in the 11th grade, when students clearly

    • 01:00:49

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: want to begin to share their online profile,when they want others to be able to find them and knowthe valuable things that they're doing and thinking and creatingonline, then they have the optionof making their blogs public and using their full names.So then when people search for them, they will find them.

    • 01:01:11

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: The benefits of being online so outweigh any of the negatives,and that's what we talk about constantly,and the students have seen it.

    • 01:01:19

      DEBRA GARCIA: What we're going to do todayis take a look at Johnny's blog post about his surgerysince he can't be here.So pop up on his blog page and hehas links to the Taylor spatial frame, whichis what he has on his legs.

    • 01:01:32

      NARRATOR: In Debra's elective science class,one of her students has had an extended absencefor a surgical procedure.During his absence, he set up a blog for his classmates,allowing them to get a better understanding of the procedureand his perspective on the experience.

    • 01:01:48

      DEBRA GARCIA: I mean, when you look at one of these picturesup here, I mean, that's going into the skin, into the bone.

    • 01:01:55

      NARRATOR: The student has an orthopedic condition requiringthe use of a Taylor spatial frameto correct a curvature in his tibia.Debra uses the class model of a skeletonto better explain the condition.

    • 01:02:06

      STUDENT: His fibula is smaller than the tibia.They're supposed to be about equal.

    • 01:02:10

      DEBRA GARCIA: Yeah.So what's the fibula and the tibia?Is the tibia the shinbone and the fibula the back?So the tibia, is it this one?Somebody double check.

    • 01:02:20

      STUDENT: Yes.

    • 01:02:20

      DEBRA GARCIA: Yeah, that one, and then your fibulais this one.Which was shorter?

    • 01:02:24

      STUDENT: His tibia was shorter.

    • 01:02:25

      DEBRA GARCIA: Yeah.So imagine that being shorter.So what's the goal of the spatial frame?What's that supposed to do?Did anyone find the link, what itsays on there, what it's supposedto actually do for him?Should we watch the YouTube clip about it?

    • 01:02:39

      NARRATOR: The student located a YouTube clipon the internet about his surgery to share with his classand posted it on his blog.

    • 01:02:48

      WILL RICHARDSON: You go through that processand really get invested in blogs to some extent basedaround the things that you're interested in.I think then you have a good starting pointto apply blogs in your classroom or to begin to use themin your classroom with really good pedagogybecause you understand, again, it'snot simply about publishing.It's about the connections that you make after you publish.It's those interactions where the real value in this is,

    • 01:03:10

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: and it's hard to understand that if you're not interactingand connecting with other people in those contexts already."Wiki" the word comes from Hawaiian meaning quick,and it was used by a guy by the name of Ward Cunningham who"invented," quote, unquote, wikis.And he used it because he just wanted that particular spaceto be someplace where they could come and update

    • 01:03:32

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: quickly and share very easily.

    • 01:03:34

      NARRATOR: Most people who use the internet probably haveused Wikipedia and have some sense of what it represents.Searching on almost any topic results in a Wikipedia entry.This vast store of information has tremendous valueto educators.

    • 01:03:50

      WILL RICHARDSON: I think Wikipedia is probablyone of the most, if not the most important websitesthat teachers really need to understand right now, notnecessarily for what it is but for what it represents,which is basically the collaborative constructionof truth.I mean, that's what people are attempting to capture there.Wikipedia's goal is to be the sum of human knowledge online,

    • 01:04:11

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: so you can imagine the potential for that.A lot of people have problems with Wikipediabecause anyone can edit anything, pretty much,and certainly that means that there are going to be errors,there's going be vandalism, thereare going to be lies that are added.But the reality of it is that most studies now, in fact,just about all the studies show that Wikipedia

    • 01:04:32

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: is as accurate or reliable as most other sources,primarily because it is without question the mostcurrent information that you're going to find in any one place.If you look at any disaster, if youlook at any type of major news event,watch the entry in Wikipedia growand you'll understand why it is as powerful as it is.

    • 01:04:54

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: Now, the problem with Wikipedia more than anything else,I think, is the writing.And you can imagine what it's like whenyou get 1,000 people trying to writeone particular entry anywhere.The writing is not going to be great.But from a background standpoint and from a factual standpoint,Wikipedia is actually pretty accurate,and it is a site that our kids are using.

    • 01:05:17

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: There's no question about it.They go home.They look at Wikipedia first.Many of them stop there, and that's not a great thing.I think Wikipedia is a good startingpoint for their research.It's a place where they can go and get some linksand get some context for what it is that they're looking for,but we should teach kids to always verifywhat they find online, whether it'son Wikipedia or anywhere else.That's just a part of being a good editor of information

    • 01:05:39

      WILL RICHARDSON [continued]: these days.

    • 01:05:41

      NARRATOR: Let's look at two other examplesof how you can use Google Reader to searchfor information on stem cells.Open your Google Reader and click on the BrowseFor Stuff link.Several prepackaged feeds are presented.The news feed seems appropriate, and itoffers both national and international sources.Press Subscribe to add these sources to your RSS feed.

    • 01:06:05

      NARRATOR [continued]: Now, if you search on stem cells,a large number of articles from these new sourcesare available to browse through.Again, we can star the items that seem of most interestfor later reference.A second way to browse for informationis to search for feeds related to stem cells.

    • 01:06:29

      NARRATOR [continued]: It looks like this one on how stem cellswork would provide some good background information.The same technique can be used to access student work.

    • 01:06:39

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: I know, Erica,you were saying at some point youhad a question on your blog.Feel free, any of you, to come up and lookat what some of the other studentshave done as you post your reflectionsand your annotations.

    • 01:06:50

      NARRATOR: As you explore and share what you find on the web,the volume of information becomesdifficult to organize and keep concise.Luckily, social bookmarking tools such as Diigohave been developed to assist youin making this job more manageable.Signing up for Diigo allows you to place a menu lineat the top of your browser, which gives you the capability

    • 01:07:11

      NARRATOR [continued]: to highlight lines you want to call attention to.Here, a line in Wikipedia is highlightedand a comment is posted.Susan is using Diigo in her ninth grade English classto help her students discuss the poem "Pumpernickel."

    • 01:07:31

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: Today, studentswere doing several things, actually.I had them in small groups.Some students went to a site whereI had saved the poem "Pumpernickel" to a site calledDiigo, which is a social bookmarking tool,so they were able to annotate, this is a symbol of something,or this is a metaphor, or this is a powerful line.

    • 01:07:50

      LIZ: If you look here, you can see commentsthat other people have made.You highlight a line and you say a comment,and you can see all the other commentspeople have made about it.

    • 01:07:60

      SIMONE: My friend Liz actually just annotatedon the same line that I did, the last line,"I tell you why we must risk everythingfor the raw recipe of our passion."She had a similar interest in the line, how it comes togetherand the meaning of the poem really comes togetherat the end.So that was probably one of my favorite lines in this poem.I took clients that really stuck out

    • 01:08:22

      SIMONE [continued]: to me, that really meant something to me, that I feltI could describe to other people and have interactions.It feels better to be able to discussthe poem with other people and get their outlook on itand what they thought of it and see if you reallyhave similar interests in those same linesand things like that.It's really good to be able to annotatebecause I feel like you get a better understanding of what

    • 01:08:43

      SIMONE [continued]: you're reading.

    • 01:08:44

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN: What's reallyexciting about this tool, though-- because theycould do that in a notebook, theycould have it on a piece of paper and be writing--is that their annotations are visible to anyonein this ninth grade group, and so the other students werewatching as their friends were sharing their comments online.They could either then comment on another line of the poem

    • 01:09:04

      SUSAN CARTER MORGAN [continued]: or they could respond to something a friend had said.

    • 01:09:07

      SIMONE: I annotated here that I loved the ending of the poembecause it really tied together.Typically, you would think of a short story or a novelto have a really strong moral at the ending,but I feel like basically, this is saying that if you reallyhave a passion for something, you should reallygo out there and do it and do whateveryou have to do to get there.So that's what I liked about this poem.

    • 01:09:27

      LIZ: I think this is a little more helpful in a waybecause when you're typing it, itseems more like you can think about it a little morethan just having a discussion, and everyonefeels comfortable with sharing when it's notjust an open discussion because everyonegets to say what they think.

    • 01:09:44

      SIMONE: While reading other people's, youfeel like you really understand what they're reading.You might pick up something from them.It's just a really different way of having a discussion.

    • 01:09:55

      WILL RICHARDSON: I don't think there'sany question that video is a powerful way to communicateand one that captures our kids' imaginations more than textthese days.

    • 01:10:09

      STUDENT: We made one for science class, whichwe might end up posting on YouTube.We haven't posted any yet.It was about cell mitosis.It was kind of like claymation, sort of.

    • 01:10:20

      STUDENT: The cell cycle is broken down into three stages.The first stage of the cell cycleis called the interphase, and the interphase--

    • 01:10:27

      STUDENT: My group certainly focused a loton making the movie, but it was because we had to research itfirst to put all the information in the movie,and it was really fun to learn that way.It was definitely different and moreinteresting than taking notes in class, I think.All the laptops came with this Premiere.It's a movie making software.It's really simple to use and it's a lot of fun.

    • 01:10:46

      STUDENT: In order to split the cytoplasm,it is pinched and contracted, this area being calledthe furrow, and the cell is split in half.For plant cells, pinching is not involved,but instead, the formation called a cell plate.

    • 01:10:57

      STUDENT: Before the exam, I can just pull the movie back upand watch it again, so more interestingthan reviewing notes, too.

    • 01:11:05

      STUDENT: Archipelagos.

    • 01:11:06

      STUDENT: There's archipelagos, yes.Malaysia archipelago and Indonesia archipelago.

    • 01:11:11

      STUDENT: Did we say the Himalayas?

    • 01:11:13

      NARRATOR: Carey, a middle school geography teacher,used social networking tools to connect with a Canadian teachereducation student working in Malaysia.Using YouTube, she was able to createa dialogue between her students and studentson the other side of the globe.

    • 01:11:28

      CAREY POHANKA: When we talked to the people in Malaysia,we watched this video, and in it, they actuallytalk about the climate at the beginning.I got in contact with a professor in Canadawho wanted to have students of his thatare education students connect with classrooms,either by blogging or something like that,

    • 01:11:49

      CAREY POHANKA [continued]: and I got picked to have the student thatwas in Malaysia, who is a Canadian studying abroadin Malaysia.Did you hear what she said?

    • 01:11:56

      STUDENT: They have two seasons, wet and hot.

    • 01:11:58

      CAREY POHANKA: Wet and hot.So they have two seasons, wet and hot, and they have--So he and I connected and decidedwhat we wanted to do in my class.We threw out a lot of ideas, and thenhe finally came up with the idea of doing Did You Know videos.And so that video that we were looking at in class todayis the video that he made with the students in Malaysia

    • 01:12:20

      CAREY POHANKA [continued]: that he was working with.So they wake up at 5:00.Why do you think they wake up so early?

    • 01:12:36

      STUDENT: It's very hot and humid.

    • 01:12:37

      CAREY POHANKA: Hot and humid, right?Do you remember me telling you the story about whenI was talking to Mr. Jackson on Skypeand he forgot that it was going to be on cameraand he wasn't wearing a shirt?Do you remember me telling you that?Why wasn't he wearing a shirt?

    • 01:12:49

      STUDENT: Because it was so hot.

    • 01:12:50

      CAREY POHANKA: Because it was so hot, right?Now, this is actually where he stayed.What can you tell from that area?Nick?

    • 01:12:58

      STUDENT: It's more populous than the schoolwhere they filmed the movie.

    • 01:13:02

      CAREY POHANKA: Yeah.It's much more populous, right?What does it look like?

    • 01:13:06

      STUDENT: A city.

    • 01:13:07

      CAREY POHANKA: A city, right?It looks like a city.But if we go over to where his school was-- and I don't know,distance-wise, how he got there all the time and stuff--but what does this area look like?

    • 01:13:17

      STUDENT: It's very rural.

    • 01:13:19

      STUDENT: Farmland.

    • 01:13:20

      STUDENT: Very foresty.

    • 01:13:22

      CAREY POHANKA: Yeah.It looks like a rainforest, perfect.And when we think of Malaysia, we just think maybe one thing.We don't think about it having different aspects of it.I use Google Earth a lot in my classbecause it gives them a sense of gettingto see it from the big picture and thennarrow in to the smaller picture.And today, I was able to show them how one part of Malaysia

    • 01:13:42

      CAREY POHANKA [continued]: is a city and very grown up and industrialized,and then there's another part where you could tellthat it was mostly just rainforest.I don't know, before Google Earth,how a geography teacher would havedone that, to be honest with you.Thankfully, I haven't been teaching geography long enoughto know.

    • 01:13:59

      NARRATOR: In the middle school, studentsare using a program called VoiceThreadto create audio programs that include images.

    • 01:14:06

      STUDENT: Here's a good question.Do you like LEGOs, or have you even heard of them before?If not, get with the program.

    • 01:14:14

      WILL RICHARDSON: Very easy now to createyour own amateur radio show and post that uponline so that other people can consume it and listen to it.A lot of elementary school classroomsare using podcasting.Kids love to record and to publish in that way.

    • 01:14:30

      MICHELLE REDDING: Today, we're working in an introductoryto technology class, and we are working on the VoiceThreadprogram.In this program, the students willlearn how to create a VoiceThreadon any particular subject, which we tell themthey can go out and use in their classrooms.

    • 01:14:47

      STUDENT: I love our computer lab and all, and this is only halfof it, you know, but when it gets overcrowded with students,it's really hard to work, especially when people talk,which I don't do.

    • 01:14:57

      STUDENT: Is it possible to build a tower this highor is it just a doctored photo?I think it's real.

    • 01:15:05

      NARRATOR: These students created an audio track with imagesin their computer technology class.They have chosen a topic that interests them,written a script, and found or createdimages for their program.

    • 01:15:17

      MICHELLE REDDING: This has been particularly helpfulwith foreign language classes because they are actuallyusing it to speak in the languagesthat they're learning, but this programwill allow them to use voice, or they can alsocomment through the keyboard.

Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms

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Abstract

This film examines the use of technology, blogs, and other resources that give students access to information, including the ability to learn from people all over the world.

Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms

This film examines the use of technology, blogs, and other resources that give students access to information, including the ability to learn from people all over the world.

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