Bilingual Education

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    • 00:01

      MICHAEL FRANK: When x is equal to 3, go to x.And what's the y value?

    • 00:05

      FEMALE STUDENT: 5.

    • 00:05

      MICHAEL FRANK: 5.So is it possible that that point is on the line?[SPEAKING SPANISH] ¿Es posible que esta por la linea?

    • 00:12

      STUDENTS: No.

    • 00:13

      MICHAEL FRANK: No.No.[SPEAKING SPANISH] No, porque cuando el valores "x" por esta linea el valor para el "y" es igual aYeah.When the value of x is 3, the value of y is--

    • 00:27

      STUDENTS: 5.

    • 00:27

      MICHAEL FRANK: And the question says that so the answer is no.Excellent.Very, very, very good.All students, whether they're ESL students or mainstreamstudents, are required in the state of New Yorkto get a state diploma, which meansthey have to pass state exams.The only requirement in math that all students haveis to get past the algebra state exam, which

    • 00:49

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: we call the Regents exam.So that's my mission.My mission is to take students from Ecuador and the DominicanRepublic or from whatever country they arrive from,get them passed that exam.For some students, they have a very low level of math.Some of them come with a higher level of math.But I don't want the language to be the barrier for them

    • 01:09

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: to learn the concepts.So I will speak Spanish.I will speak English.I will let them answer in Spanish and English.When the day of the exam comes, one of the interesting thingsthat happens is that if they are still classified as an ELLstudent, they will receive the exam in Englishand they will get it an exam in their first language

    • 01:30

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: if they speak a first language in which it's written.Spanish, of course, is one of them.So they get an English exam and a Spanish exam.Most of my students hardly ever touch the Spanish exam.So even though we've spoken in Spanish for two yearsand we've learned everything, everythingI do on the board and everything that's handed to them,everything in the book is in English,they become more accustomed to the English lexicon of math

    • 01:52

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: rather than their first language, which they sometimesget confused when they see the words.There are some terms that are writtenon the wall in both languages, in both English and Spanish.Usually that's something that happens early in the year.It's an extra credit project.Often the students want to convert thingsthat they already see on the wall.

    • 02:14

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: They see it in English and they want the Spanish conversion.So that's some of the posters that yousaw that remained there were translationsthat they made themselves as an extra credit project.And plus, I use the words.And often, when I'm speaking Spanish I make mistakesand I started inventing words.And if they see that happening, theywant to correct me, which is great.

    • 02:34

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: That becomes a lesson in and of itself.And they want to write on the boardso I say it correctly in Spanish as well.I often tell my students about the timesthat I was learning how to speak Spanishand how it's a part of learning a languageand learning it well is being willing to embarrass yourself.And usually that conversation comes

    • 02:55

      MICHAEL FRANK [continued]: after I've embarrassed myself and they're alllaughing hysterically.And so yeah, that happens and we break the ice.It happens very early because there's always something I say,which is silly or I use one of their wordsand they laugh at that.And yeah, I think they are more atease using English knowing that my Spanish isfar from being perfect.

Bilingual Education

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Abstract

Michael Frank, a mathematics teacher in New York, discusses his bilingual approach to math instruction.

Bilingual Education

Michael Frank, a mathematics teacher in New York, discusses his bilingual approach to math instruction.

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