An emerging problem description

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    • 00:06

      SPEAKER 1: So Sophie, I'm wonderingif you had any questions about what we just discussedabout the limits of confidentiality.

    • 00:13

      SOPHIE: You had mentioned about child abuse,that if I knew of a child being abused,that would need to be reported.But I'm just wondering if I thinkthat maybe someone's at risk for it, how that sort of works.

    • 00:23

      SPEAKER 1: OK.So at risk, well we'd have to look further into thatand see why you have this belief and why-- what makesyou think that the child is being abused.And if there is a good chance that the child is being abused,then we would have to report that.

    • 00:39

      SOPHIE: OK.

    • 00:40

      SPEAKER 1: So I'm wondering-- does that answer your question?

    • 00:43

      SOPHIE: Yes, yes.

    • 00:45

      SPEAKER 1: I'm wondering what brings you in today,and how can I be helpful, and how can these sessionsbe helpful to you.

    • 00:51

      SOPHIE: Well I've been feeling a lot of stress lately.I've been just feeling anxious, having trouble sleeping,concentrating.I don't normally feel this way.This isn't sort of something I'vebeen dealing with for a long time.But I'd say I've gone through a very stressful year this year.I have two kids-- two boys-- and I

    • 01:13

      SOPHIE [continued]: have a husband who was recently ill this year.It was sort of unexpected.He went in for just a routine surgeryand it ended up going terribly wrong.It's sort of created-- he was ill for a long time,so I had to take all these different roles,including the primary breadwinner.

    • 01:36

      SOPHIE [continued]: So he was the one who watched the kids and he would work.And now I sort of was in a positionwhere I had to work full time, take care of the kids,find people to help me take care of the kidsbecause we didn't have the money to pay someone.So now it's a year later, he's still not able to work,and the finances are just starting to really just really

    • 01:59

      SOPHIE [continued]: stress me out.I mean, I'm used to having everything under control.As a child, my parents weren't able alwaysto provide the most stable financially.So I sort of-- I kind of got in the habit very youngto be really organized with my money.I always had money set aside.I always had money in the bank.And now it's just debt, and I'm not used to it,

    • 02:22

      SOPHIE [continued]: and I just can't sleep.

    • 02:25

      SPEAKER 1: OK.So from what I'm hearing, you weresaying that unexpectedly your husband got sick.And because of all this, you find that-- would yousay that there's a lot on your plate?

    • 02:36

      SOPHIE: Yeah, definitely.It's overflowing.

    • 02:38

      SPEAKER 1: It's overflowing.OK.So can you describe a little bit moreabout what is so overflowing?Like you were saying you're working full time.You're a mother.You're taking on all these different roles.Can you describe what a typical day would look like?

    • 02:55

      SOPHIE: Oh, absolutely.So I would wake up in the morning,depending on my work schedules.So a lot of time I work from home.So I'll wake up at 7 o'clock in the morning.The kids might not be awake yet.I'll try to get a little bit of work in.And then the kids will wake up.And then I have to get them their breakfast,

    • 03:15

      SOPHIE [continued]: get them organized.Then once breakfast is all done, I start working again.Meanwhile, trying to put out any firesthroughout the day that are coming up.Organizing all doctor's appointments.Organizing all paperwork.Organizing-- just the entire household.It could include grocery shopping,laundry-- like every task sort of falls to me.

    • 03:40

      SOPHIE [continued]: And then my husband-- there's sortof nursing I have to do for him.So caretaking for him.And there's a lot of concern all the time that he's doing OK.So I'm just always thinking, are the kids OK?Is he OK?Can I get all the work done I need to today?Are we out of milk today?

    • 04:01

      SOPHIE [continued]: Like, it's just everything.Anything that runs our life I have to take care of.

    • 04:08

      SPEAKER 1: So like you were saying,you're the primary caregiver or the primary breadwinnerof the family.Sounds like a lot.Lots going on.

    • 04:18

      SOPHIE: It is.So I think one of hard things for meis sort of the fear behind worrying that something'sgoing to fall through the cracks,or I'm just not doing my best all the time.It's scary to think that my kids couldbe hurt by anything that I am doing or am not doing.

    • 04:40

      SOPHIE [continued]: And just the pressure-- I feel like there's just a load on meall the time.And when I try to go to sleep, my mind just doesn't stop.I feel like it does I'm going to miss something.

    • 04:56

      SPEAKER 1: OK.So you're describing that you feellike you have to be the best and youhave to do the best in that there is alwaysa lot of pressure.And you feel like there's a big load on you.What this load look like?What does it feel like?

    • 05:11

      SOPHIE: It feels heavy.It feels heavy, like my chest feels heavywhen I think about it.And my head just-- it doesn't feel clear.It just feels foggy.Because I'm used to things being in their place.I'm used to things being sort of more simple.And so when everything is all jumbled together,

    • 05:32

      SOPHIE [continued]: nothing's clear.

    • 05:34

      SPEAKER 1: So would you say that things are little out of placenow?Or are they just kind of all over the place?

    • 05:40

      SOPHIE: Yeah, definitely all over-- nothing'sever in its place.

    • 05:43

      SPEAKER 1: Nothing's ever in its place.

    • 05:44

      SOPHIE: Because on top of everything,I don't have time to keep everything in place.I think I'm a bit of a perfectionist like that, too.So it's like the house-- because Ihave everything to do-- the house starts to get a mess.And then it's like this visual accumulationof all the stuff I have going on.And then it's a constant reminder

    • 06:04

      SOPHIE [continued]: that I don't have things together.

    • 06:06

      SPEAKER 1: So you were talking at the beginning about anxiety,and you were saying that you have a needto be a perfectionist.Would you say that everything being out of placerelates to your wanting to fulfillthis need of being a perfectionist?This anxiety and perfectionism-- doyou think that all kind of goes in hand-in-hand?

    • 06:26

      SOPHIE: I would definitely say they go hand-in-hand.

An emerging problem description

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Abstract

Gaya and Sophie “An emerging problem description” Scenario Background Sophie is 27 years old, married with two young children. A year ago, her husband had a routine surgery that went wrong and he has been unable to work since that time. Sophie has had to step into the primary breadwinner role. She is feeling overwhelmed, worried about finances, taking care of the children and her husband, and is sleeping poorly. Video Introduction Watch this segment of a first segment with Gaya as counselor with her client Sophie. It begins with Sophie seeking clarification about limits to confidentiality. Jot down the key words that Sophie then uses to describe the problem that brings her for counselling. What questions does Gaya use to help Sophie expand this description? How does the “plot thicken” in the sense of the description becoming more complex and multifaceted? What aspects of the counselor’s practice might you have done similarly/differently? Video Analysis The picture of the problem is an ever evolving thing There are always more angles, more nuance, to draw forth. There is a time when it feels too early to get proactive because the picture is insufficiently clear; and there is a time when it begins to feel as though—though never complete—the picture is adequately filled in to move forward. In this exchange, Gaya intermittently acknowledges Sophie’s challenges while inviting her to continue to add “brush strokes” to the emerging picture.

An emerging problem description

Gaya and Sophie “An emerging problem description” Scenario Background Sophie is 27 years old, married with two young children. A year ago, her husband had a routine surgery that went wrong and he has been unable to work since that time. Sophie has had to step into the primary breadwinner role. She is feeling overwhelmed, worried about finances, taking care of the children and her husband, and is sleeping poorly. Video Introduction Watch this segment of a first segment with Gaya as counselor with her client Sophie. It begins with Sophie seeking clarification about limits to confidentiality. Jot down the key words that Sophie then uses to describe the problem that brings her for counselling. What questions does Gaya use to help Sophie expand this description? How does the “plot thicken” in the sense of the description becoming more complex and multifaceted? What aspects of the counselor’s practice might you have done similarly/differently? Video Analysis The picture of the problem is an ever evolving thing There are always more angles, more nuance, to draw forth. There is a time when it feels too early to get proactive because the picture is insufficiently clear; and there is a time when it begins to feel as though—though never complete—the picture is adequately filled in to move forward. In this exchange, Gaya intermittently acknowledges Sophie’s challenges while inviting her to continue to add “brush strokes” to the emerging picture.

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