Aggregators

View Segments Segment :

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Embed
  • Link
  • Help
  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Embed
  • Link
  • Help
Successfully saved clip
Find all your clips in My Lists
Failed to save clip
  • Transcript
  • Transcript

    Auto-Scroll: ONOFF 
    • 00:00

      DAN FALTESEK: Hi.My name is Dan Faltesek.I'm an Assistant Professor of Social Media at Oregon StateUniversity.And this video is about content aggregators.There are a number of ways that Legacy Media producers foundways to distribute content.Sometimes they paid for it as a partof their traditional journalism effort.Sometimes they bought stories from freelancers.Or in the case of television, they bought entire programs

    • 00:21

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: from third party companies.These relationships expect that the content one distributesis secured through some kind of contractual relationshipbetween a content creator and a distributor.The advent of new media distribution systems makesthis relationship more complicatedas the physical primacy of distribution technologyhas been challenged by some extremely lightweight modes

    • 00:42

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: of distribution.Historically, media were difficult to transport.Before paper-based newspapers, rags-- literal rags--were messy and heavy and damp and difficult to movefrom city to city.The transfer of information, aside from telegraph messages,was relatively slow and laborious and expensive.James Carey has noted the difficulty of communication

    • 01:05

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: was a major consideration in The Federalist Papers.If information can't get around, it can't cause problems.New media distribution made it possible for many new authorsto join the world of publishing and for many new publicationsto be created and for informationto move much faster.Aggregators depend on newly found easein copying and distributing information quickly.

    • 01:25

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: Aggregators, A, tend to collect informationfrom a number of news sources, and parse that informationto block quotes with links to the original.Or B, aggregators tend to assemblea table of links that autonomously takes oneto reach the original content.The first formulation is much more profitableas the clicks lead to a page that then has advertisingplaced by the aggregator.

    • 01:46

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: This mode of making money dependson finding content that is interestingand then modifying it in some sort of waythat one could use to draw clicks.The aggregator, thus, gains the benefitsof a large supply of content without payingfor producing that content.Here are a few examples.An aggregator could find an original news storyfrom a content creator, remove the boring parts,and post the newly shortened form of the story

    • 02:07

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: on an aggregation hub.An aggregator could find materialin a content-rich community, such as artwork,recipes, designs, then post that materialon their own site with links back to the first site.An aggregator could also use a robot toolto crawl the pages of many news agenciesto then detect and present new stories on those agencies

    • 02:28

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: on a list.This could also be done with a human labor or moresophisticated algorithms.Now there are some concerns about these aggregators.First, making content takes time and money.Writing is hard.Just ask a writer.If revenue is routed to distributors,who do not engage in the practice of making content,it might sap the supply of cash neededto produce new journals of art, television shows,

    • 02:50

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: whatever else.Aggregators would respond to thisby indicating that they're sending new traffic to siteswhere people might become fans, they might go back,they might click the links there rather than on the aggregationhub.And that content, to some degree,has always been aggregated, or at least edited.Some people might say aggregationproduces an echo chamber.There have been incidents where news agencies have depended

    • 03:10

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: on other agencies for confirmation of ongoing newsevents, only to find that the confirming agency hadbeen echoing the first firm in a rush to scoop others,and thus created their own confirmation.In computer science, this is known as the Sybil problem,or one cannot rely on the same actant to verifytheir information.Aggregators respond that these echo chambers have always

    • 03:30

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: been a part of mass media.You would be loathe to find a time whenmajor newspapers weren't coveringthe same story on the same day.Aggregation can also make a firm vulnerable.Any autopoietic system is ripe for sabotage,much less simple errors.Several years ago, an aggregator deployed by several leadingnewspapers had indexed a satire page by mistake.This caused the system to run an article claiming

    • 03:52

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: that Nobel-Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman hadinterpersonal bankruptcy after buying too many homefurnishings.The automated technology thus puts the newspaper's name--in this case, The Boston Globe-- on a false story.This was embarrassing for The Globe.One could use a system like this for sabotageor even for running attacks, such as the use of Outbrainby the Syrian Electronic Army.

    • 04:13

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: Although aggregators may provide an opportunityfor additional revenue-- those Outbrain boxesdo make you money-- any system that interactswith your brand, campaign, or firm-- deploying your namecan be risky.Aggregators [INAUDIBLE] would surelybe working to employ their systems on a continuous basis.In short, aggregators are services or technologythat collects potentially attention-worthy news

    • 04:33

      DAN FALTESEK [continued]: items for repackaging and circulation.This could take the form of pseudo news organizations,content hubs, or third party link inserts.There are benefits and risks to the existence and useof these systems.

Aggregators

View Segments Segment :

Unique ID: bd-meco-defi-aggregators-AA01982



Abstract

Professor Dan Faltesek explains what content aggregators are, highlights the benefits and drawbacks of their use, and explains how they differ from historic content distribution systems.

Aggregators

Professor Dan Faltesek explains what content aggregators are, highlights the benefits and drawbacks of their use, and explains how they differ from historic content distribution systems.

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website

Back to Top