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Estrid Sørensen, Alison Marlin & Jörg Niewöhner

In: The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Data Collection

Chapter 10: From Scholastic to Emic Comparison: Generating Comparability and Handling Difference in Ethnographic Research

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From Scholastic to Emic Comparison: Generating Comparability and Handling Difference in Ethnographic Research
From Scholastic to Emic Comparison: Generating Comparability and Handling Difference in Ethnographic Research
Estrid SørensenAlison MarlinJörg Niewöhner
Introduction

Comparison is central to the analytic and data collection practices of social science researchers, as well as to the everyday practices of people going about their daily lives. Comparison is, first and foremost, a way of making sense of things, organizing or describing them, and working with them. We might say that comparison is a way of working with differences and similarities between people, objects, concepts, feelings, and other sorts of things. When introducing his ‘Ethnography in/of the World System', George Marcus (1995) noted that phenomena of and in contemporary worlds rarely rest immutably in one ...

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