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Jessica L. Schleider & Hans S. Schroder

In: The SAGE Handbook of Personality and Individual Differences: Volume I: The Science of Personality and Individual Differences

Chapter 7: Implicit Theories of Personality Across Development: Impacts on Coping, Resilience and Mental Health

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Implicit Theories of Personality Across Development: Impacts on Coping, Resilience and Mental Health
Implicit Theories of Personality Across Development: Impacts on Coping, Resilience and Mental Health
Jessica L. Schleider Hans S. Schroder

Instinctively and from an early age, humans rely on guiding beliefs to make sense of the social world. Heider (1958) proposed that we are all ‘naïve scientists': that our common-sense theories of social phenomena guide our perceptions, expectations, and behavior toward those around us. Whether these self-theories are accurate, they can profoundly shape our reactions to everyday experiences, and can affect longer-term outcomes. For example, attachment theory suggests that young children with responsive caregivers develop a theory of the self as acceptable and ...

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