The SAGE Handbook of Personality and Individual Differences: Volume III: Applications of Personality and Individual Differences

Handbooks

Edited by: Virgil Zeigler-Hill & Todd K. Shackelford

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  • Chapters
  • Front Matter
  • Subject Index
  • Part I: Health and Psychological Adjustment

    Part II: Social Behaviour

    Part III: Personality in the Workplace

  • Copyright

    Editorial Board

    Robert A. Ackerman, PhD, University of Texas at Dallas

    Jonathan M. Adler, PhD, Olin College of Engineering

    Mathias Allemand, PhD, Universität Zürich

    Jack J. Bauer, PhD, University of Dayton

    Peter Borkenau, PhD, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

    Bradley J. Brummel, PhD, University of Tulsa

    Amy B. Brunell, PhD, The Ohio State University at Mansfield

    Susan T. Charles, PhD, University of California at Irvine

    A. Timothy Church, PhD, Washington State University

    C. Randall Colvin, PhD, Northeastern University

    Anthony D. Hermann, PhD, Bradley University

    Jan Hofer, PhD, Universität Osnabrück

    Christopher J. Holden, PhD, Appalachian State University

    Chris J. Jackson, PhD, University of New South Wales Sydney

    John A. Johnson, PhD, Pennsylvania State University

    Kevin Lanning, PhD, Florida Atlantic University

    Christopher T. Leone, PhD, University of North Florida

    Shanhong Luo, PhD, University of North Carolina Wilmington

    Charlotte N. Markey, PhD, Rutgers University

    Matthew J. W. McLarnon, PhD, Oakland University

    Kate C. McLean, PhD, Western Washington University

    Fred L. Oswald, PhD, Rice University

    Peter J. Rentfrow, PhD, University of Cambridge

    Willibald Ruch, PhD, Universität Zürich

    William G. Shadel, PhD, RAND Corporation

    Jefferson A. Singer, PhD, Connecticut College

    Ashton C. Southard, PhD, Oakland University

    Steven J. Stanton, PhD, Oakland University

    Howard Tennen, PhD, University of Connecticut Health Center

    Todd M. Thrash, PhD, College of William and Mary

    Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford, PhD, Oakland University

    Dustin Wood, PhD, Wake Forest University

    List of Figures

    List of Tables

    Notes on the Editor and Contributors

    The Editors

    Virgil Zeigler-Hill, PhD, is a Professor and the Director of Graduate Training for the Department of Psychology at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. He earned his PhD in social-personality from the University of Oklahoma in 2004 under the guidance of Dr Carolin J. Showers. His primary research interests are in three interrelated areas: (1) dark personality features (e.g., narcissism, spitefulness), (2) self-esteem, and (3) interpersonal relationships. He is the author of more than 180 publications including edited volumes such as The Dark Side of Personality, Self-Esteem, Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology, and The Evolution of Psychopathology. He is currently an associate editor for the Journal of Personality, Journal of Personality Assessment, and Self and Identity as well as serving as a co-editor for the Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences.

    Todd K. Shackelford received his PhD in Evolutionary Psychology in 1997 from the University of Texas at Austin. Since 2010, he has been Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, where he is Co-Director of the Evolutionary Psychology Lab. In 2016, he was appointed Distinguished Professor by the Oakland University Board of Trustees. Shackelford has published around 250 journal articles and his work has been cited about 15,000 times. Much of Shackelford's research addresses sexual conflict between men and women, with a special focus on testing hypotheses derived from sperm-competition theory. Since 2006, Shackelford has served as editor of the journal Evolutionary Psychology, and in 2014 he founded the journal Evolutionary Psychological Science as Editor-in-Chief.

    The Contributors

    Juliet R. Aiken is the Program Director of the University of Maryland I/O Master's of Professional Studies. She earned her PhD in Industrial Organizational Psychology and a Certificate in Statistics in Measurement at the University of Maryland, College Park. In addition to her work at UMD, Juliet consults for public, non-profit, and private companies as well as other researchers. Her consulting and research focus on leveraging statistics to promote diversity in organizations, improve talent management, and enable organizational change. Recent clients include the IBEW Local 26 Apprenticeship Program, the Federal Aviation Administration, Intrax Inc., and Mercer. Juliet also has experience in legal contexts, both as an expert witness for the Department of Justice, and as a consultant engaged by the Receiver for the Jefferson County Commission, Alabama during their consent decree. Juliet was one of the recipients of the 2017 Innovations Award from the International Personnel Assessment Council for her work on cognitive ability tests.

    Craig A. Anderson, Stanford University, 1980, is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Iowa State University; Director, Center for the Study of Violence; and Past-President of the International Society for Research on Aggression. His 230-plus publications have received over 34,000 citations. His book Violent Video Game Effects on Children and Adolescents included the first longitudinal study of this topic. He is considered by many to be the world's leading expert on violent video game effects. His General Aggression Model has been applied to clinical, social, personality, and developmental psychology; pediatrics; criminology; and war and climate change, among other fields. In 2017 Dr Anderson received the Kurt Lewin Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Psychological Issues – its top award. It was presented for ‘outstanding contributions to the development and integration of psychological research and social action'.

    Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi received a PhD in Clinical Psychology (minor: personality) at Michigan State University in 1970, and is currently Senior Research Associate at Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, and Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Haifa. He is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of 19 books and 150 articles and chapters on the psychology of religion, social identity, and personality development. Among his best-known books are Psychological Perspectives on Religion and Religiosity (2015), Psychoanalysis and Theism (2010), Psychoanalysis, Identity, and Ideology (with John Bunzl, 2002), The Psychology of Religious Behaviour, Belief and Experience (with Michael Argyle, 1997), Psychoanalytic Studies of Religion (1996), Despair and Deliverance: Private Salvation in Contemporary Israel (1992), and Prolegomena to the Psychological Study of Religion (1989).

    Lisa Blatz is a PhD student in Social Psychology at the Social Cognition Center Cologne. She studied Psychology at the University of Jena and the University of Göttingen with a focus on cognitive psychology and cognitive neurosciences. Her research aims at investigating the interaction of social and individual factors on the elicitation and consequences of emotions. More specifically, her research focuses primarily on social-functional approaches to emotions with a special emphasis on emotions that arise in social comparisons, such as envy, pride, or admiration. Furthermore, she is interested in the influence of social and individual values and beliefs about status attainment on status-related emotions.

    Andrew R. Bower is a post-doctoral researcher in the Education, Psychology, and Leadership department at Texas Tech University. He earned his PhD in Human Ecology from the University of California, Davis. Conceptually, his interests are identifying the factors that impact children and adolescents becoming culturally and biologically productive adults. To date, his research has focused on using cultural evolutionary and human behavioral ecological theories of behavior (e.g., aggression, leadership, altruism, prosociality, bullying, and peer victimization) to explain social and structural factors that impact public health, social relationships, and individual adjustment (e.g., loneliness, depression, anxiety, perceptions of health) across social and developmental transitions.

    Eddie Brummelman is Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at Stanford University and the University of Amsterdam. He earned his PhD in Developmental Psychology from Utrecht University in 2015. His research examines the socialization of the self: how children internalize social experiences to form views of themselves, such as narcissism and self-esteem. His publications have appeared in journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Psychological Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Current Directions in Psychological Science.

    Kim-Yin Chan is Associate Professor at Nanyang Business School of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Prior to becoming a full-time academic in 2009, he had a 25-year military career during which he received his PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, majoring in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. His current research interests focus on individual differences and leadership, and on his entrepreneurial, professional, and leadership (EPL) model of individual careers, motivations, and development. He has published scholarly articles in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Career Assessment, Multivariate Behavioral Research, and Educational and Psychological Measurement. He is also the lead author of Military Leadership in the 21st century: Science and Practice, a textbook published by Cengage in 2011.

    Aleksandra Cichocka is Senior Lecturer in Political Psychology at the School of Psychology, University of Kent, and a member of the Governing Council of the International Society of Social Psychology. She received her PhD from the University of Warsaw, Poland. She examines how the self-concept and group image relate to intergroup attitudes, political ideology, and political behavior. She is the author of over 30 publications, including edited volumes such as The Psychology of Conspiracy and Social Psychology of Social Problems: The Intergroup Context. She serves an associate editor for the European Journal of Social Psychology.

    Russ Clay is a Senior Data Scientist in the Department of Medicine at the University of Virginia. He earned his PhD in Experimental (Social) Psychology under the guidance of Dr Natalie J. Shook in 2012. Prior to starting his current position at the University of Virginia, Russ held teaching positions in the psychology departments at the University of Richmond, Aurora University, Concordia University of Chicago, and Northeastern Illinois, and was also a member of the research faculty at the City University of New York, College of Staten Island. His primary research interests are the behavioral immune system, social and political attitudes, and conspiracy beliefs. He has authored or co-authored multiple peer-reviewed publications on these topics.

    Peter J. Clough is Head of Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. He gained his PhD from the University of Aberdeen, investigating the motivations and impacts of marathon running. He is interested in performance psychology, specifically optimizing outputs in stressful environments. He has worked in a number of applied areas, including elite sport, business, and the performing arts. He is perhaps best known for his work in mental toughness – he has an international reputation in this domain – and was the developer of the 4 Cs model of toughness. He has published extensively in this area, with over 50 papers and numerous books and chapters.

    Jan Crusius is Assistant Professor for Social Psychology at the University of Cologne. In 2009, he obtained his PhD in Thomas Mussweiler's lab in Cologne investigating the relationship of envy and desire. In his recent research, he is primarily interested in how social, temporal, and counterfactual comparisons shape emotion, motivation, and behavior. He has a particular interest in status-related emotions such as envy, pride, and admiration and how they affect goal pursuit, cooperation, and conflict in interpersonal relationships, as well as within and between social groups. He investigates these phenomena using a social-cognitive approach complemented by research on personality characteristics.

    Kristof Dhont is Lecturer in Psychology at the School of Psychology, University of Kent. He received his PhD from Ghent University, where he also completed a postdoctoral fellowship supported by the Research Foundation Flanders (Belgium). His research focuses primarily on the role of personality and situational factors in human intergroup and human–animal relations. He investigates the psychological underpinnings and ideological roots of ethnic prejudice and speciesism, and the psychology of eating and exploiting animals. He has published widely on these and related topics in prominent academic journals including Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, European Journal of Personality, Current Directions in Psychological Science, and European Review of Social Psychology. He currently serves as associate editor for the journal Group Processes & Intergroup Relations and as Consulting Editor for the European Journal of Personality.

    Erin K. Davisson is Research Scientist and Associate Director of the Administrative Core in the NIH-funded Center for the Study of Adolescent Risk and Resilience at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. She earned her doctorate in Social Psychology at Duke in 2013 under the guidance of Dr Rick Hoyle. Her research focuses on self-regulation broadly, including self-control and its influence on health and problem behaviors, as well as measurement issues related to self-regulation and self-control. She is an experienced meta-analyst, having contributed to multiple meta-analytic research syntheses on a range of topics in social and personality psychology.

    Lotte van Dillen is Associate Professor at the Social and Organizational Psychology Unit of Leiden University. She earned her PhD in Psychology from the VU University Amsterdam in 2009 under the guidance of Prof Sander Koole and Dr Dirk Heslenfeld. Her teaching and research is located at the intersection of motivation science, social psychology, and cognitive neuroscience. Her research addresses the interplay between cognition and affect, and how this translates into decision-making in the domains of economics, health, and law.

    Laura J. Dixon is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Mississippi, director of the Health and Anxiety Research and Treatment Laboratory, and a licensed Clinical Psychologist. She obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Wyoming in 2014 and completed her predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Mississippi Medical Center Consortium. Dr Dixon's research emphasizes emotional, behavioral, and psychophysiological processes that contribute to anxiety-related disorders. She has published numerous scientific articles on these topics and received an early-career-development award from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America in 2014.

    Megan C. Finsaas is a Clinical Psychology PhD candidate at Stony Brook University, New York. She earned her BA in Psychology at Bethel University, Minnesota, and her MA in Clinical Psychology at Stony Brook University. Her research interests center around the developmental psychopathology of common disorders, with a focus on relationships between psychopathology and functioning and the impact of life stress. She is interested in using longitudinal modeling techniques to understand the course of disorders as well as the way risk factors, like temperament, parental psychiatric history, and adversity, predict course.

    Konstantina Foti is a PhD Candidate at Newcastle University Business School in Newcastle upon Tyne. She holds a Master's degree in Human Resources Management from Athens University of Economics and Business, and a BSc in Psychology from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Her doctorate research and thesis center around the investigation of the effects of modern technology on employee recovery and well-being.

    Bruno S. Frey was born in Basel, Switzerland in 1941. He studied economics at the Universities of Basel and Cambridge (UK); he earned his PhD (1965) and Habilitation (1969), at the University of Basel, where he was Associate Professor from 1970 to 2011. From 1970 to 1977 he was Full Professor at the University of Konstanz and from 1977 to 2012 at the University of Zurich. In 1990–1 he was Visiting Research Professor at the University of Chicago. Since 2004 he has been Research Director, CREMA – Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts, Zurich. From 2010 to 2013 he was Distinguished Professor at the University of Warwick, and from 2012 to 2015 he was Senior Professor at Zeppelin University, Friedrichshafen. Since 2015 he has been Permanent Visiting Professor at the University of Basel. He holds honorary doctorates from five European universities in five different countries. He is the author of Not Just for the Money; Economics as a Science of Human Behaviour; Arts & Economics; Inspiring Economics; Dealing with Terrorism – Stick or Carrot?; Happiness and Economics; Happiness: A Revolution in Economics; and The Economics of Happiness. He is the co-author of The New Democratic Federalism in Europe; Successful Management by Motivation, and Honours versus Money: The Economics of Awards.

    David C. Funder is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside. He received his PhD from Stanford University and before coming to Riverside served on the faculties of Harvey Mudd College, Harvard University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is best known for his research on the accuracy of personality judgment and more recently investigating the psychological nature of situations. He is the author of The Personality Puzzle, an undergraduate textbook for personality psychology.

    Adrian Furnham was educated at the London School of Economics, where he obtained a distinction in an MSc Econ, and at Oxford University where he completed a doctorate (DPhil) in 1981. He has subsequently earned a DSc (1991) and DLitt (1995) degree. Previously a lecturer in Psychology at Pembroke College, Oxford, he has been Professor of Psychology at University College London since 1992. He has lectured widely abroad and held scholarships and visiting professorships at, among others, the University of New South Wales, the University of the West Indies, the University of Hong Kong, and the University of KwaZulu-Natal. He has also been a Visiting Professor of Management at Henley Management College, and he has been made Adjunct Professor of Management at the Norwegian School of Management. He has written over 1,200 scientific papers and 86 books.

    Brandon L. Goldstein is a Clinical Psychology PhD candidate at Stony Brook University, New York under the guidance of Dr Daniel N. Klein. His primary research interests involve early-emerging vulnerability factors of depression and anxiety disorders examined using longitudinal and family designs. Specifically, he is interested in personality, self-referential information processing, basal diurnal cortisol, and EEG/ERP measures of vulnerability.

    Harold W. Goldstein is Professor of Industrial/Organizational Psychology at Baruch College, the City University of New York. He received his PhD from the University of Maryland. His primary areas of expertise are in personnel staffing and equal employment opportunity issues, leadership development, and organizational culture. He is best known for his work on the design of tests of intelligence that produce reduced racial and gender-based subgroup differences. Harold regularly publishes in scholarly journals and books and is the lead editor of the recently published Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Recruitment, Selection, and Employee Retention. In addition, his work on designing intelligence tests earned him and his team the M. Scott Myers Award for Applied Research from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the International Personnel Assessment Council's Innovations Award.

    Kim L. Gratz is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at the University of Toledo. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2003, after completing her predoctoral internship at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr Gratz received the Young Investigator's Award of the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder in 2005 and the Mid-Career Investigator Award of the North American Society for the Study of Personality Disorders in 2015. Dr Gratz's laboratory and treatment-outcome research focuses on the role of emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder, self-injury, and other risky behaviors. Specifically, her research focuses on understanding the role of emotion dysregulation in these conditions (through the use of novel behavioral/experimental paradigms) and applying this understanding to the development of effective treatments. She also studies the intergenerational transmission of personality traits and emotion regulation difficulties from mothers to infants.

    William G. Graziano is Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette. He earned his PhD in Psychology at the University of Minnesota. His interests are in motivational processes and behavior. For approximately 30 years, he and his research team and his collaborators focused on the motivational foundations for individual differences in agreeableness.

    P. D. Harms is Assistant Professor of Management in the Culverhouse College of Commerce at the University of Alabama. He received his PhD in Personality Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He specializes in applied personality and his research focuses on the role that individual differences play in organizational behavior and leadership. His work has appeared in numerous scholarly outlets, including Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, the Leadership Quarterly, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. His work has been supported by many funding bodies, including the US Army and Department of Labor.

    Patricia H. Hawley received her PhD in Psychology in 1994 from the University of California at Riverside, and held a postdoctoral research position at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. Her theoretical perspective on power in human social groups (resource-control theory) was published in 1999 and has been used to frame children's aggression, peer relationships, moral functioning, and interpersonal relationships. She spear-headed two volumes: Aggression and Adaptation: The Bright Side of Bad Behavior and The Evolution of Personality and Individual Differences, and is currently translating her work into practical application for bullying mitigation.

    Michael P. Hengartner is Senior Researcher and Lecturer at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences. He earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Zurich in 2013. His three main research interests are (1) the dynamic interplay between personality and psychopathology and the relevance of personality factors for mental health and social functioning; (2) psychiatric epidemiology and classification of mental disorders; and (3) efficacy, benefits, and harms of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions in psychiatry. He is the author of more than 90 publications and a reviewer for leading psychiatric journals, including the American Journal of Psychiatry, Lancet Psychiatry, and Psychological Medicine. Currently he is an associate editor for Frontiers in Psychiatry and Personality and Mental Health.

    Wilhelm Hofmann is Professor of Social and Economic Cognition at the University of Cologne Center for Social and Economic Behavior. He earned his PhD in Psychology from the University of Landau in 2006 under the guidance of Dr Manfred Schmitt. His teaching and research is located at the intersection of motivation science, social psychology, personality psychology, and economic behavior. His primary research topics are self-regulation, goal pursuit, consumer psychology, behavioral economics, and moral decision-making. He has authored and co-authored more than 80 articles in psychology and cross-disciplinary journals and has edited or co-edited several books on human behavior including The Psychology of Desire and Reflective and Impulsive Determinants of Human Behavior. He serves as the current associate editor for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

    Rick H. Hoyle is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. He earned his PhD in Social Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1988 under the direction of Dr Chester Insko. He has wide-ranging research interests, of which the primary themes are the self (with a particular focus on self-regulation), risk-related dimensions of personality, and psychological measurement. In addition to many journal articles and book chapters on these topics, he has edited or authored eight books, including Selfhood: Identity, Esteem, Regulation (with Kernis, Leary, and Baldwin) and the Handbook of Personality and Self-Regulation. He has served as editor of Self and Identity and Journal of Social Issues, and as associate editor for Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Journal of Personality.

    Annika K. Karinen is a PhD student in the Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology at Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. She earned her MSc in Social Psychology from the University of Amsterdam in 2015, under the guidance of Hanah Chapman at Brooklyn College in New York. Her Master's thesis focused on the influence of disgust sensitivity on moral judgment, and her PhD project focuses on the behavioral immune system and its consequences for health and innovation. Her research interests, broadly construed, include emotions, aesthetic and environmental psychology, and individual differences in personality.

    Jeffrey C. Kennedy is Senior Lecturer at Massey University. He has worked as an I/O psychologist in the military and a major consulting firm, involved in assessment, selection, and leadership development. He was New Zealand's lead investigator for the GLOBE study of culture and leadership across 62 countries/societies. During ten years in Singapore, he was a member of a team researching the use of multi-source feedback for leader development, and was Academic Director for a large university non-degree executive education program. He has published in top academic journals (e.g., Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Applied Psychology) and practitioner journals (e.g., Organization Dynamics, Academy of Management Executive).

    Ellen M. Kessel is a Clinical Psychology PhD candidate at Stony Brook University, New York. She earned her AB in Economics at Columbia University and MA in Clinical Psychology at Stony Brook University. Her research primarily focuses on the etiology and pathophysiology of childhood irritability and the neural mechanisms that link irritability to other forms of child and adolescent psychopathology. Her research also investigates the role of early experience, such as caregiving and adversity, on the development of affective, cognitive, and motivational processes that commonly play a role in psychopathology. Her work has been published in journals including Development and Psychopathology, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    Elizabeth J. Kiel is Associate Professor of Psychology at Miami University. She received her PhD in Child Clinical and Developmental Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia, where she trained with Dr Kristin Buss in emotion development in early childhood and its relation to risk for anxiety problems. Her current work focuses on understanding the nature of parent–child relationships for anxiety-prone children, with a particular emphasis on child-elicited effects on parenting. She takes a developmental-psychopathology approach to understanding how behavioral, emotional, and psychobiological processes in both children and their parents contribute to these interactions over time.

    Daniel N. Klein is Distinguished Professor and Associate Chair for the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, New York. He earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Buffalo in 1983. His primary research interests are in the classification, development, course, familial transmission, and treatment of depression, with secondary interests in anxiety and personality disorders. He has published approximately 400 papers and chapters, and his work has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health for over 30 years. He is a recipient of the Society for Clinical Psychology (APA Division 12) Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Clinical Psychology, the Joseph Zubin Memorial Award from the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, and the Society for Research in Psychopathology Sustained Mentor Award. He has also served as President of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology (APA Division 12, Section 3) and the Society for Research in Psychopathology.

    Daniel C. Kopala-Sibley completed his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology at McGill University, Montreal, under the supervision of Dr David Zuroff, and a postdoctoral fellowship at Stony Brook University, New York under the guidance of Dr Daniel Klein. He is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Calgary, where his research pertains to the development of individual traits and how those traits confer vulnerability on internalizing psychopathology in youth.

    Roman Kotov is Associate Professor at the Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook University, New York. He earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Iowa in 2006 under the mentorship of Dr David Watson. His primary research interests are (1) classification of mental disorders; (2) the interface of normal personality and mental disorders; and (3) biomarkers for psychopathology. He is an author of more than 120 peer-reviewed papers and a primary investigator of over 25 extramural grants.

    Selda Koydemir holds a PhD in Counseling Psychology. She has held research and teaching positions at Middle East Technical University in Turkey and at Northern Cyprus Campuses, Florida State University, Roehampton University, Chemnitz University of Technology, and the University of Bamberg. Her research focuses mainly on individual and cultural differences in well-being, happiness, and quality of life. She has published several articles in reputable journals and is the author/editor of books and book chapters in the area of personality and counseling psychology. She currently lives in London, where she works as a freelance researcher, and is an Honorary Professor at the University of Bamberg in Germany.

    Robert F. Krueger is Hathaway Distinguished Professor, Distinguished McKnight University Professor, and Director of Clinical Training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota. He completed his undergraduate and graduate work at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and his clinical internship at Brown University. He received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1996 in Psychology. Professor Krueger's major interests lie at the intersection of research on psychopathology, personality disorders, psychometrics, behavior genetics, and physical health. He has received a number of major awards, including the University of Minnesota McKnight Land-Grant Professorship, the American Psychological Association's Award for Early Career Contributions, the Award for Early Career Contributions from the International Society for the Study of Individual Differences, and an American Psychological Foundation Theodore Millon Mid-Career Award. He is a Fellow of the American Psychopathological Association (APPA) and the Association for Psychological Science (APS), and was inducted into the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP). He is also the editor of the Journal of Personality Disorders.

    Jens Lange is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Amsterdam. He earned his PhD in Social and Personality Psychology from the University of Cologne in 2016 under the supervision of Thomas Mussweiler and Jan Crusius. During his PhD, he also passed a research visit at the University of British Columbia in the Emotion and Self Lab directed by Jessica Tracy. His primary research interests are (1) social-functional approaches to emotions with a special emphasis on status-related emotions such as envy and pride; (2) interpersonal and intergroup emotion regulation; and (3) the social effects of dark personalities such as narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy.

    Elliott C. Larson is a doctoral candidate in Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the Graduate Center and Baruch College, the City University of New York. His research interests include personnel selection, training and development, and emotions in the workplace. Elliott has worked on several programs of research, including predicting performance in high-stakes testing and investigating the predictors of constructive and destructive reactions to envy in the workplace. His work has been published in Current Directions in Psychological Science, the Encyclopedia of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Wiley Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Recruitment, Selection, and Retention. In addition, Elliott was one of the recipients of the International Personnel Assessment Council's Innovations Award for his work on cognitive abilities.

    Dusica Lecic-Tosevski is Neuropsychiatrist, Psychotherapist, and Professor of Psychiatry at the Belgrade University School of Medicine. She is a full member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, and Director of the Institute of Mental Health and WHO Collaborating Center. She earned her PhD in Psychiatry (‘Dysthymia and Its Relationship with Personality Disorders') from the University of Belgrade under the guidance of Prof Milan Ignjatovic. Her primary research interests are in the following areas: (1) personality disorders; (2) stress; (3) affective disorders; and (4) comorbidity. She has coordinated many international and national research projects. She is the author of many papers and chapters in international journals and books (including the Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry).

    Tera D. Letzring is Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Experimental Psychology PhD program at Idaho State University. She earned a PhD in Psychology from the University of California, Riverside, in 2005 and a BA in Psychology from the University of Puget Sound in 1999. Dr Letzring's research focuses on the interpersonal accuracy of judgments of personality, and in particular on the factors that moderate accuracy, such as characteristics of the judge and the type of information that is available to the judge. This work has mainly focused on judgments of traits but also extends to judgments of state affect and personal values. Her work has been published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the Journal of Personality, and the Journal of Research in Personality, among others.

    Ying Lin is a graduate student at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on antecedents and consequences of cultural mindsets in dynamic social contexts. She has been educated on four continents: growing up in China, she then attended a high school in Australia; and since receiving her BSc in Psychology at University College London, she has studied Social Psychology in Los Angeles.

    Donald R. Lynam is Distinguished Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. He earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1995. His research examines the contribution of individual differences to psychopathology and deviance across the lifecourse. Much of his work uses general models of personality to conceptualize more complex constructs (e.g., psychopathy, narcissism, impulsivity). He is the author of more than 200 publications, including the edited volume The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Psychopathy. He has served as associate editor for Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Psychological Science, and Journal of Personality.

    Nadja P. Maric, M.D, PhD, is Psychiatrist, Head of Department for Research and Early Interventions in Psychiatry at the Clinic for Psychiatry, Clinical Center of Serbia, and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Belgrade University School of Medicine. In collaboration with basic scientists, she coordinates the clinical part of translational research, focused mainly on different HPA-related molecular factors in the etiology of affective and psychotic disorders. Additionally, she has been evaluating different aspects of social factors and neuro-cognition associated with clinical and subthreshold spectrum of psychopathology. She is the author of over 100 research and review papers.

    Joshua D. Miller is Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at the University of Georgia. He received his BA in Psychology from the State University of New York, Binghamton, and his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kentucky. He completed an internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His research examines the relations between basic personality traits and a variety of psychopathological constructs, with a particular focus on personality disorders such as psychopathy and narcissism. His work suggests that personality disorders can be conceptualized, assessed, and diagnosed from general-trait frameworks. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, and he co-edited the Handbook of Narcissism and Narcissistic Personality Disorder: Theoretical Approaches, Empirical Findings, and Treatments. He is a past associate editor of the Journal of Personality and a current associate editor of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

    Julian Mutz is a doctoral researcher at the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King's College London. He completed his undergraduate training in Psychology (BSc) at the University of Groningen (2012–15) and at University College London (2014–15). He earned a postgraduate degree in Affective Disorders (MSc) from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King's College London (2015–16) and is also a graduate of the International Master in Affective Neuroscience program (MSc) of Maastricht University (2015–17). Julian has worked as a research assistant on the PRAISe study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial led by King's College London, and the SCAMP cohort study at the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Imperial College London. His research interests cover a broad range of topics, including mood disorders, brain stimulation, evidence synthesis, statistical modeling, and research on emotions.

    Ioannis Nikolaou is Associate Professor in Organizational Behavior and Director of the MSc in Human Resources Management at Athens University of Economics and Business. Before starting his academic career, Ioannis gained wide working experience as an Assistant Manager for PricewaterhouseCoopers, Greece, and as Head of the Training Department at Egnatia Bank. He has written an organizational psychology textbook in Greek and with Janneke Oostrom co-edited the book Employee Recruitment, Selection, and Assessment. Contemporary Issues for Theory and Practice. He has also published in international peer-reviewed academic journals (e.g., Applied Psychology: An International Review, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, International Journal of Human Resources Management, International Journal of Selection and Assessment, Personality & Individual Differences, Journal of Managerial Psychology), while his research interests focus on employee recruitment, selection, and assessment.

    Lorren O. Oliver is the Director of the Personnel Board of Jefferson County and the Federally Appointed Receiver over the Jefferson County Commission consent decree concerning discrimination in employment practices. Prior to his work at the PBJC, Lorren was the Executive Director of the Entrepreneurial Education Center and the Associate Dean/Director of the Assessment Center at the School of Justice at Miami Dade College. He optimizes operations by realigning infrastructure, implementing cost-effective processes, and selecting, developing, and retaining key talent. Lorren is experienced in government, public safety, education, and mental health. He is skilled in driving and managing change, re-engineering business processes of organizations in jeopardy, and directing human resources in dynamic, rapidly changing environments. He received a Master's of Science in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Baruch College, the City University of New York. Lorren has been recognized for his work on intelligence tests by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the International Personnel Assessment Council.

    Benjamin Oosterhoff is Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Psychology Division at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He earned his PhD in developmental psychology from West Virginia University in the Spring of 2015 under the guidance of Drs Natalie J. Shook and Aaron Metzger. His primary research interests are in three interrelated areas: (1) adolescent civic and political engagement; (2) political attitudes and moral judgment; and (3) disease avoidance. He is the author of several peer-reviewed articles published in the fields of social psychology, developmental psychology, and political science.

    Kostas A. Papageorgiou is Lecturer in Developmental Psychopathology at Queen's University Belfast and an Associate Professor in Personality Psychology at Tomsk State University. Kostas lectures on MSc courses in the School of Psychology at Queen's and he supervises BSc, MSc, PhD, and postgraduate students’ research. He is also the convenor of the course Interdisciplinary Study of Development I in the International MSc in Human Development: Genetics, Neuroscience, and Psychology at Tomsk State University. Kostas is the Director of the InteRRaCt Lab and an International Associate Member of InLab at Goldsmiths, and the Russian–British Behavioural Genetics Laboratory at the Psychological Institute of the Russian Academy of Education. He is also a member of the committee of the Special Interest Group in Paediatric Psychology of the Psychological Society of Ireland and a member of the International Society for Intelligence Research.

    Bojana Pejuskovic, MD, is Psychiatrist at the Department for Psychotic Disorders of the Belgrade Institute of Mental Health, head of its Education Unit, a clinical assistant of psychiatry, and an REBT psychotherapist. She earned her PhD in Psychiatry from the University of Belgrade in 2014 (‘Posttraumatic Stress Disorder of Civilians in the General Population after Major Trauma') under the guidance of Prof Dusica Lecic-Tosevski. Her research interests are traumatic stress, burnout syndrome, depression, and psychotic disorders. She is the author of many publications.

    Charles A. Scherbaum is Professor of Psychology at Baruch College, the City University of New York. His research focuses on personnel selection, ability testing, and analytics. Publications of his research have appeared in journals such as Personnel Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, Educational and Psychological Measurement, Journal of Business and Psychology, and Human Resource Management Review. Charles was one of the winners of the 2011 M. Scott Myers Award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology as well as the 2011 and 2017 Innovations Award from the International Personnel Assessment Council for his research on cognitive ability tests. Charles received a PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Ohio University.

    Julie Aitken Schermer (formerly Harris) is a Professor in the Department of Management and Organizational Studies at the University of Western Ontario. She received her PhD in 1999 in the area of personality psychology. She was an Assistant Professor at Brescia University College, London, Ontario for two years. She was then hired as an Assistant Professor in the Administrative and Commercial Studies Program (later the Department of Management and Organizational Studies) in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Western Ontario, where she was tenured in 2006 and became full professor in 2014. She has authored or co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications including articles, book chapters, a Canadian Business Statistics textbook, and her vocational interest measure, the Jackson Career Explorer.

    Astrid Schütz holds the Chair of Personality Psychology and Assessment at the University of Bamberg and is also the Director of its Competence Center for Applied Personnel Psychology. She has been a Professor of Psychology at Chemnitz University of Technology and held visiting positions at the University of Huelva, the University of Virginia, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, and the University of Southampton. Her research focuses on personality in social relationships. She studies self-esteem, narcissism, and emotional intelligence in social interactions and develops tools for assessment and training. She is the author of 87 peer-reviewed articles and the author/editor of 21 books in the area of personality and assessment. She is associate editor of the Journal of Individual Differences and a member of the editorial boards of Frontiers and Self and Identity.

    Constantine Sedikides is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Self and Identity at the University of Southampton. He earned his PhD in Social Psychology from Ohio State University in 1988 under the guidance of Thomas Ostrom. His research is concerned with self-evaluation, narcissism, authenticity, and nostalgia. His publications have appeared in journals such as Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Emotion, Journal of Personality, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

    Natalie J. Shook is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at West Virginia University. She received her PhD from Ohio State University in 2007 under the mentorship of Russell H. Fazio. She accepted a faculty position at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2007 and remained in that position until 2011, when she joined the faculty at West Virginia University. Her research focuses on understanding the cognitive and affective processes underlying attitude formation and change, and how attitudes guide behavior. In particular, she studies the cognitive negativity biases underlying depression and anxiety, the role mindfulness may play in reducing these negativity biases, the role of disgust in shaping group attitudes and sociocultural beliefs, and the extent to which affective and cognitive processes change across the life span.

    Seth M. Spain is Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources at the John Molson School of Business at Concordia University, Montreal. He received his PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on the assessment of individual differences, especially dark personality characteristics and the role they in leadership and job performance. His work has appeared in numerous scholarly outlets, including the Leadership Quarterly, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the Journal of Organizational Behavior, and the Psychological Review. He is a Senior Associate Editor of the Leadership Quarterly.

    John A. Terrizzi is Assistant Professor in the Psychology and Philosophy Department at Texas Woman's University in Denton. He earned his PhD in Experimental Social Psychology from West Virginia University under the mentorship of Dr Natalie J. Shook. His program of research broadly examines the role of the behavioral immune system (e.g., disgust) in the maintenance of social attitudes, behavior, and interpersonal relationships.

    Sander Thomaes is Associate Professor of Psychology and the Chair of Developmental Psychology at Utrecht University. He earned his PhD in Developmental Psychology from the VU University Amsterdam in 2007 under the guidance of Dr Hedy Stegge. His research is concerned with three broad, interrelated questions: (1) What causes youth to think and feel about themselves the way they do? (2) Why and how does the self impact youth psychological development and health? (3) What characterizes youths’ ‘healthy’ self-views, and how are these different from less healthy self-views? His publications have appeared in journals such as Child Development, Developmental Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Psychological Science.

    Renée M. Tobin is Professor and Coordinator of the Counselling Psychology program at Temple University in Philadelphia. She earned her Master's in Social Psychology and her doctorate in School Psychology at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses broadly on personality and social development. Specifically, she is interested in individual differences as predictors of children's responsiveness to social-emotional interventions. Her work can be found in both applied and basic research outlets including Best Practices in School Psychology, School Psychology Quarterly, Psychological Science, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. She is also co-author of DSM-5 Diagnosis in the Schools. She is currently an associate editor for the Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment.

    Matthew T. Tull is Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Toledo. His research broadly focuses on the role of emotion dysregulation in the development and maintenance of anxiety-related pathology, with an emphasis on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr Tull's recent work has highlighted the context-dependent nature of maladaptive behaviors (e.g., drug-seeking behavior, treatment dropout) among patients with PTSD and substance use disorders, providing evidence that these behaviors may be more likely to occur in the context of trauma-related emotional distress and when individuals experience difficulties regulating that distress. Dr Tull's research has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He was the 2009 recipient of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Chaim and Bela Danieli Young Professional Award and the 2010 recipient of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies President's New Researcher Award.

    Joshua M. Tybur is Associate Professor in the Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology at Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. He earned his PhD in Evolutionary Psychology from the University of New Mexico in 2009 under the advisement of Geoffrey Miller and Steve Gangestad. His research interests, broadly construed, include emotions, personality, political ideology, and moral judgment. He also takes a great interest in theoretical approaches within psychology (specifically, social psychology), and he largely uses an evolutionary perspective in his own research. He is currently associate editor of Evolution and Human Behavior and Evolutionary Psychology.

    David D. Vachon is Assistant Professor of Psychology at McGill University, Montreal. He received his BSc in Psychology and Criminology in 2005 from the University of Toronto, his PhD in Clinical Psychology in 2013 from Purdue University, West Lafayette, his clinical internship in forensic drug diversion in 2013 from Yale University, and his postdoctoral degree in Behavioral Genetics in 2015 from the University of Minnesota. His research spans a wide range of externalizing behaviors, including crime, violence, sexual assault, child abuse, substance use, gambling, and risky sex; he views these deviant behaviors as natural outcomes in the absence of specific internal controls, or ‘inner policemen', such as empathy and constraint.

    Olivera Vukovic, MD, is Psychiatrist, Head of the Day Hospital for Adults at Belgrade Institute of Mental Health and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Belgrade University School of Medicine. She earned her PhD in Psychiatry (‘The Effects of Personality Dimensions on Cardiovascular Reactivity in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease') from the University of Belgrade in 2014 under the guidance of Prof Dusica Lecic-Tosevski. Her primary research interests are in (1) personality, (2) stress, and (3) affective disorders. She is the author of many publications.

    Wayne A. Warburton completed his PhD on Aggressive Behavior at Macquarie University, Sydney, in 2007, also winning the Australian Psychological Society Outstanding Thesis in Psychology Award for that year. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Macquarie University and a registered psychologist. His research interests primarily center around aggressive behavior and media impacts, with a particular focus on aggressive schema, aggressive personality traits, violent and prosocial media, and screen addiction. He has won more than 20 awards for his scholarship and teaching, including four from the Australian Psychological Society. He co-authored two major international reports on media violence and the statement of world experts on video game violence for a US Supreme Court case. His publications include the book Growing up Fast and Furious: Reviewing the Impact of Violent and Sexualized Media on Children.

    Aidan G. C. Wright is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. He earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Penn State University in 2012 under the mentorship of Dr Aaron L. Pincus. His primary research interests are in three interrelated areas: (1) the relationship between normal personality and psychopathology, (2) ambulatory assessment of maladaptive functioning, and (3) pathological narcissism. He is the author of more than 100 publications. He is currently an associate editor for the Journal of Personality and serves on a number of editorial boards, including for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, and Clinical Psychological Science.

    Kenneth P. Yusko is a co-principal of Siena Consulting, a human capital consulting firm, and the Deputy Director of the Industrial Organizational Psychology MPS Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. He also earned his Master's and doctoral degrees in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the University of Maryland. Ken is an expert in the design of personnel selection, development, and performance management systems. As a consultant in both the private and public sectors, Ken has worked with Fortune 500 companies, small businesses, partnerships, consulting firms, and government agencies. His recent clients include the National Football League, S.C. Johnson, Merck, the Motion Picture Association of America, and the Jefferson County, Alabama government. Ken and his team have been recognized for their work on developing intelligence measures, receiving the M. Scott Myers Award for Applied Research from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the International Personnel Assessment Council's Innovations Award.

    Johannes Zimmermann is Professor of Psychological Methods and Assessment at the Psychologische Hochschule, Berlin. He earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Heidelberg University in 2011. His research focuses on psychological assessment, person perception, personality pathology, and psychotherapy. He has served as president of the Society for Interpersonal Theory and Research and is currently an associate editor for the Journal of Personality Assessment and a consulting editor for the European Journal of Psychological Assessment.


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