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Caroline Wanjiku Kihato

In: The SAGE Handbook of New Urban Studies

Chapter 9: The Liminal City: Gender, Mobility and Governance in a Twenty-first Century African City1

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The Liminal City: Gender, Mobility and Governance in a Twenty-first Century African City1
The Liminal City: Gender, Mobility and Governance in a Twenty-first Century African City
Caroline Wanjiku Kihato
INTRODUCTION

When urban scholars discuss African cities, there is a familiar, solacing narrative that dominates the conversations: the continent's cities are growing at tremendous rates (UN-HABITAT, 2014) and as more and more people move to urban areas, they find non-existent economic opportunities, failing health systems, crumbling infrastructure, increasing poverty, ineffective and predatory authorities and an imperious moneyed elite (UN-HABITAT, 2014). Indeed, the dominant images Africa's cities conjure are ones where the landscapes are rolling shantytowns, where toilets ‘fly’ and rivulets of sewerage snake through cobbled-together homes. Africa's cities it seems, tell a story of failure – the failure ...

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