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Emma Shepheard-Walwyn

In: The SAGE Handbook of Nature: Three Volume Set

Chapter 53: Marginalisation of Traditional Groups and the Degradation of Nature

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Marginalisation of Traditional Groups and the Degradation of Nature
Marginalisation of Traditional Groups and the Degradation of Nature
Emma Shepheard-Walwyn
Introduction

Around the world, many indigenous cultures, and their associated traditional belief systems, have helped to manage and conserve the natural environment. A number of studies show that there are positive correlations between cultural and biological diversity, and between threatened cultural diversity and species extinction risk (Maffi, 2001, 2005; Maiero & Shen, 2004; Mishler, 2001; Smith, 2001; Sutherland, 1993). The survival of indigenous cultures and their traditions are inseparably linked to the well-being of the natural environment in which these traditions arose (Pungetti, Hughes, & Rackham, 2012a). Vecsey (1980) posits the theory that culture fundamentally arises from environmental relations, and he notes that some indigenous societies are ...

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