• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

The SAGE Handbook of Nature offers an ambitious retrospective and prospective overview of the field that aims to position Nature, the environment and natural processes, at the heart of interdisciplinary social sciences. The three volumes are divided into the following parts: INTRODUCTION TO THE HANDBOOK NATURAL AND SOCIO-NATURAL VULNERABILITIES: INTERWEAVING THE NATURAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES SPACING NATURES: SUSTAINABLE PLACE MAKING AND ADAPTATION COUPLED AND (DE-COUPLED) SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS RISK AND THE ENVIRONMENT: SOCIAL THEORIES, PUBLIC UNDERSTANDINGS, & THE SCIENCE-POLICY INTERFACE HUNGRY AND THIRSTY CITIES AND THEIR REGIONS CRITICAL CONSUMERISM AND ITS MANUFACTURED NATURES GENDERED NATURES AND ECO-FEMINISM REPRODUCTIVE NATURES: PLANTS, ANIMALS AND PEOPLE NATURE, CLASS AND SOCIAL INEQUALITY BIO-SENSITIVITY & THE ECOLOGIES OF HEALTH THE RESOURCE NEXUS AND ITS RELEVANCE SUSTAINABLE URBAN COMMUNITIES RURAL NATURES AND ...

Chapter 32: Introduction to Part Seven: Sustainability and Inequality: Reviewing Critical Issues in Understanding Consumer–Food Relationships in Global Modernity

Introduction to Part Seven: Sustainability and Inequality: Reviewing Critical Issues in Understanding Consumer–Food Relationships in Global Modernity
Introduction to Part Seven: Sustainability and Inequality: Reviewing Critical Issues in Understanding Consumer–Food Relationships in Global Modernity
Gert SpaargarenPeter Oosterveer
Introduction

Within debates on globalization and sustainable development, food has become a prominent, visible and increasingly contested topic. To feed an expanding and ever more demanding world population, food has to be produced, stored, processed, cooled and transported in ever larger quantities and improved qualities, using major parts of the surface of our planet. Food production not only claims a considerable share of world space but crucial resources – minerals, energy and water – as well. As expressed by the American environmental sociologist Alan Schnaiberg (1980), the modern food system ...

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