The SAGE Handbook of Industrial, Work & Organizational Psychology

Handbooks

Deniz S. Ones, Neil Anderson, Chockalingam Viswesvaran & Handan Kepir Sinangil

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  • Front Matter
  • Subject Index
  • Part I: WORK ATTITUDE AND VALUES

    Part II: MOTIVATIONAL PERSPECTIVES

    Part III: PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

    Part IV: TALENT MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

    Part V: LEADERSHIP, GROUPS AND TEAMS

    Part VI: WORK DESIGN AND INTERVENTIONS

    Part VII: PSYCHOLOGY OF WORK RELATIONSHIPS

  • Copyright

    List of Figures

    List of Tables

    Notes on the Editors and Contributors

    The Editors

    Deniz S. Ones is Professor of Psychology, the holder of both the Hellervik Professorship of Industrial Psychology and the Distinguished McKnight University Professorship at the University of Minnesota. She also holds the prestigious title of Distinguished University Teaching Professor, based on her doctoral student mentoring and training of world-class industrial-organizational psychologists. Several of her students have won best dissertation and early career contributions awards. Her research, published in more than 175 articles and book chapters, focuses on assessment of individual differences for employee selection and measurement of personality, integrity, and cognitive ability constructs for the prediction of job performance, especially counterproductive work behaviors. Her research has been cited over 15,000 times in the scientific literature. Her current H-index is 60 (H-index is the largest number H such that H publications have at least H citations). She has studied and served on research projects and blue ribbon panels focusing on assessment and job performance of law enforcement personnel, engineers, managers (including C suite executives), astronauts, nurses, politicians and R&D teams, among many others. In 2012, she received the Association for Test Publisher's (ATP) Lifetime Professional Career Contributions and Service to Testing Award. She is ranked in the top 100 most influential management scholars in the past three decades [Aguinis et al. in Academy of Management Perspectives, 2012] as well as ranked in the top 15 most influential management scholars in the world who have received their PhD in the past 20 years. She is ranked in the top ten most-cited authors in popular Industrial-Organizational (I-O) psychology textbooks (highest ranked woman).

    Neil Anderson is Professor of HRM and Director of Research (Work and Organization Research Centre) at Brunel University, London. Neil is also Director of the Leverhulme Trust funded international centre for research into workplace creativity and innovation research. He conducts research into innovation and well-being, personnel selection, applicant reactions, and the science-practice divide in industrial, work and organizational psychology. He is the Founding Editor of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment and his work has appeared in several outlets including Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, and Personnel Psychology. Neil has published a number of edited handbooks in these areas and is a Fellow of the BPS, SIOP, APA, IAAP, and an Academic Fellow of the CIPD. He has advised several organizations in the UK, Europe and the USA on best practice across these topic areas.

    Chockalingam Viswesvaran received his PhD from the University of Iowa and is Professor of Psychology at Florida International University, Miami. His research focuses on personnel selection, job performance assessments, and personality testing. He has served on several editorial boards including those of Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Personnel Psychology, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. He was the Associate Editor of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment from 2001 to 2006 and served as its Editor for ten years (2007–2017). He has received the best dissertation award and the early career distinguished scientific contributions award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). He is a fellow of (1) SIOP, (2) Divisions 14 (I/O) and 5 (Evaluation, Measurement, and Statistics) of the American Psychological Association and (3) the Association for Psychological Science (APS). He has co-edited a special issue of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment on the role of technology on staffing, and a special issue of the journal Human Performance on use of cognitive ability tests. He has served on the awards and fellowship committees of SIOP and on the APA Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessments. He has published over 170 journal articles and has made 250 conference presentations besides the six edited volumes.

    Handan Kepir Sinangil is Professor Emerita of Work and Organizational Psychology at Marmara University, Organizational Behaviour Graduate Program, and Adjunct Professor Emerita at Bogazici University. She has served as the General Secretary of European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). She is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP, APA Division 14), the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP), and the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP). Dr Sinangil's international and national publications exceed 70 as book chapters and conference papers. She also served as Associate Editor of International Journal of Selection and Assessment. Her ongoing research projects, either with international collaboration or alone include expatriate management, organizational culture and change, and performance appraisal and selection.

    The Contributors

    Daniela M. Andrei is Research Fellow at the Business School, University of Western Australia (UWA) and working across the Centre for Safety (C4S) and the Centre for Transformative Work Design (CTWD). Daniela completed her PhD in Psychology at Babes-Bolyai University in Romania in 2010 where she had also been working as an Assistant Professor, teaching courses and seminars in Work Psychology, Personnel Psychology and Organizational Psychology in the Psychology Department. In 2012 she joined UWA, after she was awarded the competitive GO8 European Fellowship. After the completion of her fellowship Daniela continued as a Research Fellow, working on several research projects within the ALL@UWA and the Centre for Safety. Her current research activities revolve around team leadership and team processes/emergent states and effectiveness of incident command teams in oil and gas industry as well as work design and antecedents of work design decisions.

    Raquel Asencio is doctoral candidate in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with a Masters Degree in I/O Psychology from the University of Central Florida. She served as the student representative to the INGRoup board, and is the recipient of a Goizueta Fellowship. Her research interests include teams, multiteam systems, collective identity, and social networks.

    Bradford S. Bell is Associate Professor of Human Resource Studies in the ILR School at Cornell University. He received his BA in Psychology from the University of Maryland at College Park and his MA and PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Michigan State University. Dr Bell's research interests include training and development, team development and effectiveness, and virtual work. His research has been published in journals such as Personnel Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, Human Resource Management, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, International Journal of Human Resource Management, and Academy of Management Learning & Education. He has also published numerous chapters in edited volumes. Brad was honored by the HR Division of the Academy of Management with the 2008 Early Career Achievement Award and he currently serves as Editor of Personnel Psychology.

    Lauren A. Borden is a doctoral candidate at The University of Akron. Lauren works as a Research and Development consultant at Shaker Consulting Group, where she has been responsible for developing pre-hire assessments for clients across technology, retail, and finance industries. During her time as a graduate student, Lauren has worked as a Psychology instructor, a consultant and student coordinator for the Center for Organizational research, and an intern at a local risk management consulting company. Her research interests include leadership, feedback and performance appraisal, selection, and coaching.

    Robert Cardy is Professor of Management and Chair of the Management Department at The University of Texas at San Antonio. Bob's PhD is from Virginia Tech and his undergraduate and Masters degrees are from Central Michigan University. He has teaching and research interests in human resource management, particularly in the areas of employee and student retention, performance appraisal, and the design of effective management systems. His work on management focuses on merging human resource management practices with the contemporary organizational environment. In addition to journal publications, Bob has authored a variety of books, including Performance Management: Concepts, Skills, & Exercises and Performance Appraisal: Alternative Perspectives, and Managing Human Resources.

    Dorothy R. Carter is a doctoral candidate in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include leadership, collaboration, and social networks. Her work has appeared in outlets including the Journal of Applied Psychology, The Leadership Quarterly, and The Oxford Handbook of Leadership. In the Fall of 2015, Dorothy will be joining the faculty of the Psychology Department at the University of Georgia.

    Kameron M. Carter is a PhD candidate at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include distributed role perspectives across groups and teams as well as research related to interpersonal interactions and work design. She received both a BS and a MBA from Longwood University.

    Caitlin M. Cavanaugh is a Talent Solutions Consultant with Quintela, where she manages the design and delivery of custom talent technology solutions for a portfolio of consulting organizations and Fortune 500 clients. She earned an MS in Industrial-Organizational Psychology at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis prior to earning her PhD at University of Akron. During her graduate career, she co-authored several review chapters and focused her research on performance, personality, feedback, and the social context, coaching, and employee self-development. In her professional career, she is interested in the evolving role of data science in I/O work, the reproducibility crisis in published psychology research, and the effects of technology on talent management processes and professionals.

    Melissa Chamberlin is Assistant Professor of Management at Iowa State University. She earned her PhD in Management from Arizona State University and holds a Master of Arts degree in the Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. Her research interests include employee voice and participation, team processes and communication, and workplace relationships.

    Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic is an international authority in psychological profiling, talent management, leadership development, and people analytics. He is the CEO of Hogan Assessment Systems, and Professor of Business Psychology at University College London (UCL), and Columbia University. He has previously held positions at New York University and the London School of Economics, and lectured at Harvard Business School, Stanford Business School, and INSEAD. Dr Chamorro-Premuzic has published 10 books and over 150 scientific papers (h index 59), making him one of the most prolific social scientists of his generation. His work has received awards by the American Psychological Association and the International Society for the Study of Individual Differences, to which he was director (2011–2013). Dr Chamorro-Premuzic is also the founding director of UCL's Industrial-Organizational and Business Psychology program, and the Chief Psychometric Advisor to Harvard's Entrepreneurial Finance Lab. Over the past 20 years, he has consulted to a range of clients in financial services (JP Morgan, HSBC, Goldman Sachs), advertising (Google, WPP, BBH), media (BBC, Red Bull, Twitter, Spotify), consumer goods (Unilever, Reckitt Benckiser, P&G), fashion (LVMH, Net-a-Porter, Chanel) and government (British Army, Royal Mail, National Health Service). Dr Chamorro-Premuzic's media career comprises over 120 TV appearances, including in the BBC, CNN, and Sky, and regular features in Harvard Business Review, The Guardian, Fast Company, Forbes, and The Huffington Post. Dr Chamorro-Premuzic is a keynote speaker for The Economist and the Institute of Economic Affairs.

    Chiachi Chang is pursuing his PhD in the Department of Management, London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on psychological contracts, work stress and coping, and employee health. He is currently working on the linkage between psychological needs and psychological contract breach of employees.

    Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang is Associate Professor of Organizational Psychology at Michigan State University. She received her PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from The University of Akron. Her research interests focus on occupational health and safety, leadership, and motivation. Specifically, she studies issues related to occupational stress, workplace violence, and the intersection of employee motivation and organizational leadership particularly with reference to employee health and well-being. Her work has been published in Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Psychological Bulletin, and Work & Stress. She has served as an associate editor at Applied Psychology: An International Review and Journal of Organizational Behavior, and is currently serving as an Associate Editor at Journal of Applied Psychology.

    Ana Cristina Costa is Senior Lecturer Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior at Brunel Business School, Brunel University London, UK, and Academic member of the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (CIPD). Major research interests include the areas of trust in organizations, innovation and psychological well-being, applicant reactions, and employee turnover. She is the co-founder and Investigator for the Leverhulme Trust Centre for Innovation Research (ICRN) in the UK, and Visiting Associate Professor at Valencia University (Spain). She is a member of several editorial boards and serves currently as Associate Editor of the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology.

    Jacqueline A.-M. Coyle-Shapiro is Professor in Organizational Behaviour in the Department of Management at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research interests include employment relationship, psychological contracts, social exchange theory, organizational justice, and organizational citizenship behaviour. She has published in such journals as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology and Journal of Organizational Behavior.

    Marcus Credé is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Iowa State University. He obtained his PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2005. His research interests include attitudes and other determinants of performance in work and educational settings, leadership, and measurement issues relevant to these domains.

    Gordon Curphy helps C-suite, business unit, and functional leaders develop business strategies; implement major change initiatives; hire, develop, and promote leadership talent; and build high performing teams. Taking a science-practitioner approach to leadership, Gordy has spent the past 30 years researching, teaching, practicing, and providing consulting advice on leadership. He has written 19 and sold over 100,000 books on leadership and teams and is the co-author of Leadership: Enhancing the Lessons of Experience (8th Ed.). In 2012 he published The Rocket Model: Practical Advice for Building High Performing Teams, a book intended to help leaders transform direct reports into cohesive, goal-oriented teams. As a practitioner, Gordy has held numerous leadership positions in the United States Air Force, United States Air Force Academy, Center for Creative Leadership, Blandin Foundation, and Korn/Ferry International. In addition to running his own business since 2002, Gordy has led start-ups, turn-arounds, major organizational change initiatives, and rapid growth companies. As a consultant, he has done over 1,500 executive assessments, worked with over 200 senior teams, and designed and delivered hundreds of executive coaching and leadership development programs to global clients.

    Kathryn Dalrymple is a PhD student in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of South Florida. Her research interests include team assembly, networks, team conflict, and team effectiveness.

    Leslie A. DeChurch is Professor of Communication Studies and holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Psychology, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences, at Northwestern University. Professor DeChurch's research seeks to build high-functioning teams that work in scientific innovation, space exploration, healthcare, and the military. Her research is currently supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institutes for Health (NIH), National Aeronautical and Space Agency (NASA), and Army Research Office (ARO), and has appeared in outlets including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Journal of Applied Psychology (JAP), Journal of Management (JoM), Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (OBHDP), and Leadership Quarterly (LQ). She is President and Chairperson of the Board of INGRoup, the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research. She recently served on the National Research Council Committee on the Context of Military Environments, and has contributed to several National Research Council Committees on teamwork issues ranging from measurement to innovation. DeChurch was awarded an NSF CAREER to explore Leadership for Virtual Organizational Effectiveness. Professor DeChurch holds a PhD in Organizational Psychology and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), Association for Psychological Science (APS), and the Society of Industrial & Organizational Psychology (SIOP).

    Edward L. Deci is the Helen F. and Fred H. Gowen Professor in the Social Sciences at the University of Rochester. He holds a PhD in Psychology from Carnegie-Mellon University, studied at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of London, and Hamilton College, and was an interdisciplinary post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University. For more than 45 years Deci has been engaged in a program of research on human motivation and is co-founder with Richard M. Ryan of Self-Determination Theory. He has published eleven books, including: Self-Determination Theory: Basic Psychological Needs in Motivation, Development, and Wellness (co-authored with R. M. Ryan, Guilford, 2017). He has been a grantee of the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Science Foundation, and the Institute of Education Sciences.

    Michelle K. Duffy is the Board of Overseers Professor of Work and Organizations in the Carlson School of Management. She has a PhD in Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management from the University of Arkansas and a Master's in Psychology from Xavier University. Her research focuses on: 1) the ways in which employee emotions and affect influences organizational outcomes, 2) the antecedents and consequences of antisocial behavior at work and 3) the role of mindfulness in organizational life. Her current projects include a focus on employee envy, affective balance, resume fraud and mindfulness. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology and her work has been published in journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, the Academy of Management Journal, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology. She received the Herbie Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2007 and the Carlson School of Management Award for Service in 2011. She became a SIOP and APA Fellow in 2012.

    Donald L. Ferrin is Professor of Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources at the Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University. He received his PhD from the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management in 2000. Don's research focuses entirely on trust, including determinants and consequences of interpersonal trust, trust in leadership, trust development processes, trust in the context of networks, trust violations and trust repair strategies, effects of culture on trust, trust in the context of negotiation, trust in e-commerce, and individual-, group- and organization-level trust repair.

    Gerald R. Ferris is the Francis Eppes Professor of Management, Professor of Psychology, and Professor of Sport Management at Florida State University. Ferris received a PhD in Business Administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to his current position, he also served on the faculties at Texas A&M University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Mississippi. He has research interests in the areas of social and political influence in organizations, the nature and consequences of personal reputation in organizations, the underlying dimensions and characterization of work relationships, and particularly how politics, reputation, and work relationships play key roles in human resources management practices. Ferris has been the recipient of a number of distinctions and honors. In 2001, he was the recipient of the Heneman Career Achievement Award, and in 2010 he received the Thomas A. Mahoney Mentoring Award, both from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management.

    Noelle B. Frantz is an Associate with Shaker, a Cleveland-based consulting firm specializing in talent analytics and custom assessment development. In her time at Shaker, Noelle has served in both researcher and consultant roles, developing science-based solutions designed to meet clients’ selection and assessment needs across a variety of industries and roles. Noelle studied Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the University of Akron in Akron, OH where she researched performance management, feedback, and feedback orientation. Noelle's interests also include candidate experience and reactions, assessment through science and innovation, gamification, and the use of technology to enhance business management.

    Michael Frese has a joint appointment at NUS Business School and at Leuphana University of Lueneburg. He received his PhD from the Technical University of Berlin. His research includes the psychology of entrepreneurship; factors that influence innovation and creativity in people, teams, and organizations; active performance concepts, such as personal initiative; training (e.g., for entrepreneurship in developing countries); and learning from errors and experience. Guiding concepts are evidence-based management and action regulation theory. He is one of the most cited researchers in the field of organizational behavior from outside the United States with 34,000 citations and an H-index of 90 (Google Scholar).

    C. Ashley Fulmer is a visiting Assistant Professor at Tippie College of Business, Department of Management and Organizations. She received her PhD in Organizational Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park and served on the faculty of National University of Singapore. Her research centers on trust in organizations, negotiation and conflict management, cross-cultural organizational behavior, and levels of analysis theory and research. Her work has been published in journals such as the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Management.

    Marylène Gagné graduated from McGill University and received her PhD from the University of Rochester. She is Professor of Organizational Behaviour at the University of Western Australia Business School. Her research examines how organizations, through their structures, cultures, rewards, tasks, and managerial/leadership styles, affect people's motivational orientations, and in turn the consequences of these orientations for individuals’ performance and well-being, as well as organizational effectiveness. Gagné recently edited the book Oxford Handbook of Work Engagement, Motivation, and Self-Determination Theory (Oxford, 2015). She is the recipient of many research awards, and has published many articles in organizational behavior and psychology journals. She served as the Associate Editor for the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology and is on many other editorial boards.

    Stephen W. Gilliland holds the Peter and Nancy Salter Chair in Healthcare Management and also serves as Executive Director of the Center for Management Innovations in Healthcare. He served as Department Head for the Management and Organizations Department, Associate Dean for executive education, and Vice Dean for the Eller College. Before moving to Arizona, Gilliland received degrees from the University of Alberta and Michigan State University (PhD, 1992) and was on the faculty at Louisiana State University. Professor Gilliland's research examines the organizational justice of management practices and policies and the impact of fair leadership on employee behaviors. Through this merging of social, legal, and managerial issues, he has authored over 50 journal articles, books, and book chapters. He has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and the Academy of Management Journal. In 2006, Gilliland was elected as a Fellow in the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). He was also the 1997 recipient of the Ernest J. McCormick Award for Early Career Contributions from SIOP. Professor Gilliland has taught numerous courses on business ethics, human resource management, leadership, healthcare entrepreneurship, and social entrepreneurship. Gilliland has consulted with small and large, public and private organizations on strategic planning and implementation and executive team development. He also serves on the board of directors of Merchants Information Solutions, a Phoenix-based provider of pre-employment screening, integrity testing, and identity theft management solutions.

    John N. Harris is Assistant Professor of Management at Georgia Southern University. He received his PhD from Florida State University in 2017. His research interests include leadership, organizational politics, relationships at work, social effectiveness, and reputation. His research has been published in several outlets, including Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, and Journal of Business and Psychology.

    Sarah A. Hezlett has more than 15 years of experience creating talent management solutions, including leadership development tools, 360-degree feedback systems, individual assessments, and employee engagement processes. She serves as a Senior Assessment Scientist with Korn Ferry, leading a team designing and supporting leadership assessments. Her research, which focuses on development, 360-degree feedback, mentoring, and predicting and understanding performance in educational and work settings, has been published in peer-reviewed journals, including Science, Current Directions in Psychological Science, and Advances in Developing Human Resources. She earned her PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from the University of Minnesota, where she is now an Adjunct Faculty Member.

    Robert Hogan, President of Hogan Assessment Systems, is an international authority on personality assessment, leadership, and organizational effectiveness. He was McFarlin Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at the University of Tulsa for 14 years. Prior to that, he was Professor of Psychology and Social Relations at the Johns Hopkins University. He has received a number of research and teaching awards, and is the Editor of the Handbook of Personality Psychology and author of the Hogan Personality Inventory. Dr Hogan received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, specializing in personality assessment. He is the author of more than 300 journal articles, chapters, and books. He is widely credited with demonstrating how careful attention to personality factors can influence organizational effectiveness in a variety of areas – ranging from organizational climate and leadership to selection and effective team performance. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology.

    Russell E. Johnson is Associate Professor of Management in the Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. He received his PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from The University of Akron. His research explores cognitive and affective processes that underlie organizational behavior, including employee self-concept. His research has been published in numerous outlets, including Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personnel Psychology, and Psychological Bulletin. He was an associate editor at Academy of Management Review and serves on the editorial boards at Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Journal of Organizational Behavior, The Leadership Quarterly, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology, among others. In 2013, Dr Johnson received the Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award for Science from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Originally from Canada, he still dreams of playing in the National Hockey League one day.

    Benjamin R. Jones is a PhD student in the Industrial Organizational Psychology program at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include teams, leadership, the effect of newcomers on team processes, and multiteam systems.

    Robert B. Kaiser is an author, advisor, and authority on leadership. He began his career at the Center for Creative Leadership and later joined the boutique executive development firm, Kaplan DeVries Inc. In 2013, Rob started Kaiser Leadership Solutions to set a new standard in assessment and development by offering a suite of innovative tools for improving results through leadership. He has published many articles in both the scientific literature and the international business press, as well as five books — including The Versatile Leader (2006), The Perils of Accentuating the Positive (2009), and Fear Your Strengths (2013). He is also the current editor of Consulting Psychology Journal. Rob's thought leadership is practical and useful because it utilizes the scientific method yet is grounded in his extensive experience as an executive coach, as an evaluator of candidates for executive jobs, and as a strategic talent management advisor to CEOs and HR leaders.

    You Jin Kim is Assistant Professor of Human Resource Management in the Fox School of Business at Temple University. She received her PhD from Michigan State University. Her primary research interests include organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), motives, proactive behavior, and emotion in the workplace.

    Gary P. Latham is the Secretary of State Professor of Organizational Effectiveness in the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointments in the Departments of Psychology and Industrial Relations and the School of Nursing. He is a Past President of the Canadian Psychological Association and the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology, and is the President of Work and Organizational Psychology, a division of the International Association of Applied Psychology. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Management, the American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, Canadian Psychological Association, the International Association for Applied Psychology, the National Academy of Human Resources Management, and the Royal Society of Canada. He is the only person to receive both the awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology as a Profession and as a Science from the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology. He is also the recipient of the Scholarly Practitioner award from the Academy of Management, the Heneman Career Achievement Award from the Academy of Management Human Resource Division, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division, the Thomas A. Mahoney Mentoring Award from the Academy of Management Human Resource Division, the Harry and Miriam Levinson Award for Exceptional Contributions to Consulting Psychology from the American Psychological Foundation, the Michael R. Losey Award for research that has had a significant impact on human resource management from the Society for Human Resource Management, and the James McKeen Cattell Fellows Award for Lifetime of Outstanding Contributions to Applied Psychological Research from the Association for Psychological Science. He is the co-author of Goal Setting: A Motivational Technique that Works (1984), A Theory of Goal Setting and Task Performance (1990), and New Developments in Goal Setting and Task Performance (2013) with Edwin A. Locke; Increasing Productivity Through Performance Appraisal (1994) and Developing and Training Human Resources (2002) with K. N. Wexley; and Becoming the Evidence-Based Manager (2009). Gary has served on the board of directors for the Center for Creative Leadership and the Society for Human Resource Management. He currently serves on the board of the International Association for Applied Psychology.

    Jeffery A. LePine received his PhD in 1998 from Michigan State University (1998) and is is a Professor of Management and the PetSmart Chair in Leadership at the W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University. His current research examines various issues related to team functioning and effectiveness, citizenship and participation behaviors, employee engagement, and stress. He has published his research on these and other topics in most major scholarly outlets. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    Paul E. Levy is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at The University of Akron. Dr Levy received his PhD in I/O psychology from Virginia Tech in 1989. He is a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the Association for Psychological Science, and the American Psychological Association. His consulting and research interests include performance appraisal, feedback, motivation, coaching, and organizational surveys/attitudes. He is the author of one of the leading I/O textbooks in the field and Associate Editor of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. He has over 70 refereed publications with many appearing in the top journals in the discipline such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Academy of Management, and Personnel Psychology.

    Szu-Han (Joanna) Lin is Assistant Professor of Management in the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She received her PhD from Michigan State University. Her research focuses on self-regulation, leadership, and voice. Her research has been published in Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Business and Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, and Personality and Individual Differences, and it has been cited in outlets such as Forbes, Harvard Business Review, Chicago Tribune, and New York Magazine.

    Edwin A. Locke is Dean's Professor of Leadership and Motivation (Emeritus) at the R.H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, College Park. He received his BA from Harvard in 1960 and his PhD in Industrial Psychology from Cornell University in 1964. He has published over 310 chapters, notes and articles in professional journals, on such subjects as work motivation, job satisfaction, incentives, and the philosophy of science. He is also the author, co-author or editor of 11 books, including Study Methods and Study Motivation (Second Renaissance Books, 1998), Goal Setting: A Motivational Technique that Works (Prentice Hall, 1984, with G. Latham), A Theory of Goal Setting and Task Performance (Prentice Hall, 1990, with G. Latham), Handbook of Principles of Organizational Behavior (Blackwell, 2000; and a 2nd edition with Wiley, 2009), The Prime Movers: Traits of the Great Wealth Creators (AMACOM, 2000; 2nd edition Ayn Rand Bookstore, 2008), Post Modernism and Management: Pos, Cons and the Alternative (Elsevier, 2011) and The Selfish Path to Romance (Platform Press, 2011, with Ellen Kenner). A new book on goal setting with Gary Latham, New Directions in Goal Setting and Task Performance was published in 2013. Goal setting theory (developed with Gary Latham) has been rated as #1 in importance among 73 management theories. Dr Locke has been elected a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, of the Association for Psychological Science, and of the Academy of Management. He has won the James McKeen Cattell Award from the Association for Psychological Science, Distinguished Scientific Achievement Awards from both the Academy of Management and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the OB division of the Academy of Management. He has been cited more than 11,000 times on the Web of Science and over 50,000 times on Google Scholar. He has given more than 115 papers at professional conferences and numerous lectures at universities. He is interested in the application of Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism to the behavioral sciences and has published several articles and chapters on this topic.

    Margaret M. Luciano is Assistant Professor at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. Her research interests include intergroup dynamics, teams, and systems, with a particular interest in healthcare settings. Her work is a vivid example of the scientist/practitioner model, as she has partnered with several external entities to conduct leading edge research with real-world implications and benefits. Her research has been published in leading peer-reviewed academic journals, including the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Management. She holds a PhD from the University of Connecticut.

    Liam P. Maher is a doctoral candidate in Organizational Behavior and Human Resources at Florida State University. His research interests include social influence, political will, self-concept, stress, and change management. Liam holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration, with a concentration in Finance, from Western Washington University and a Master of Business Administration from Seattle University.

    John E. Mathieu is Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at the University of Connecticut, where he also holds the Friar Chair in Leadership and Teams. His primary areas of interest include models of team and multi-team effectiveness, leadership, training effectiveness, and cross-level models of organizational behavior. He has conducted work with several Fortune 500 companies, the armed services (i.e., Army, Navy, and Air Force), federal and state agencies (e.g., NRC, NASA, FAA, DOT), and numerous public and private organizations. Dr Mathieu has over 100 publications, 200 presentations at national and international conferences, and has been a PI or Co-PI on over $11.1M in grants and contracts. He is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology, American Psychological Association, and the Academy of Management. He serves on numerous editorial boards and has guest edited special volumes of top-level journals. He holds a PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Old Dominion University.

    Cynthia D. McCauley is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Creative Leadership. She designs and manages R&D projects, coaches action learning teams, writes for multiple audiences, and is a frequent speaker at professional conferences. As a result of her research and applied work, she is an advocate for using on-the-job experience as a central leader development strategy, for seeing leadership as a product of the collective, and for integrating constructive-developmental theories of human behavior into leader development practice. Cynthia is co-editor of three books for talent development professionals: The Center for Creative Leadership Handbook of Leadership Development (Jossey-Bass, 2010), Experience-Driven Leader Development (Wiley, 2014), and Using Experience to Develop Leadership Talent (Jossey-Bass, 2014). She received a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Georgia.

    Jessica Mesmer-Magnus is Professor of Human Resource Management in the Cameron School of Business at UNCW. She earned her PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at Florida International University in 2005 and has been certified as a Senior Professional in Human Resources since 2001. Prior to beginning her doctoral program, Dr Magnus worked as a Human Resource Manager and as an HR Consultant for a national consulting firm. Her current research interests include virtual teams, team cognition and information sharing, team conflict, work/family conflict, and the role of humor in the workplace. Her work has been published in a variety of academic outlets, including Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Organizational Psychology Review, Human Performance, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and Journal of Business Ethics.

    Ozias A. Moore is a doctoral candidate at Cornell University's ILR School in the Department of Human Resource Studies. He received his BS in Business Administration from the University of Pittsburgh, an MS in Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, and an MS in Industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell University. His major research and teaching interests focus on team and multiteam effectiveness. He is particularly interested in the multilevel effects of multiple team membership on team processes and team outcomes. His research has appeared in the Journal of Applied Psychology and Small Group Research.

    Daniel W. Newton is a doctoral student in Organizational Behavior in the Department of Management at the W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University. His research interests include voice behavior, employee engagement, and informal leadership emergence.

    Sharon K. Parker is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Professor of Organizational Behavior at the UWA Business School, University of Western Australia and an Honorary Professor at the University of Sheffield where she was previously Director at the Institute of Work Psychology. She is also Associate Editor of Academy of Management Annals. Her research interests are focused on proactive behavior, work design, self-efficacy, and employee perspective taking. She has published five books, over 80 internationally refereed journal articles (including publications in top tier journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, and Academy of Management Review), over 60 book chapters and encyclopedia entries, numerous articles in practitioner outlets, and more than 60 technical reports. Professor Parker has attracted competitive research funding worth over $41,000,000, and has worked as a researcher and consultant in a wide range of public and private organizations.

    Gabe Plummer is a PhD student in the Industrial Organizational Psychology program at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include teams, team cognition and the process of switching between team and multiteam system tasks.

    Ariel Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at The University of Akron. She is a student affiliate of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and a student contributor to the Center for Organizational Research at the University of Akron. Her primary research interests are feedback seeking, performance management, implicit person theory, and the Dark Triad. Ariel's applied experience includes organizational survey creation and analytics, employee engagement, and training and development.

    Zachary A. Russell received his PhD in 2016 from Florida State University and is Assistant Professor of Management at Xavier University. His research focuses on reputation, organizational politics, human resource policies, and attitudes towards labor unions. His research is published in several outlets, including Human Resource Management Review, Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, and Journal of Labor Research.

    Richard M. Ryan, who holds a PhD from the University of Rochester, is a Professor at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education at the Australian Catholic University and a Research Professor in Psychology at the University of Rochester. A widely published researcher and theorist in the areas of human motivation, personality, and psychological well-being, he is co-developer of Self-Determination Theory, a theory of human motivation that has been widely researched internationally. Ryan, who has lectured in more than 70 universities around the globe, is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Educational Research Association, and an Honorary Member of the German Psychological Society (DGP). He was Editor-in-Chief of Motivation & Emotion and has been a James McKeen Cattell Fellow and a visiting scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Development and Education.

    Peter W. Seely is a Doctoral Candidate in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include teams, technology in the workplace, collective identity, and multiteam systems.

    T. T. Selvarajan is Associate Professor of Management in the College of Business at California State University, East Bay. He received his PhD in Management from Arizona State University. His research interests are in the areas of performance appraisal, business ethics, job engagement and work–family balance.

    Jason D. Shaw is Chair Professor and Head of the Department of Management and Marketing, the Yeung Kan Man Endowed Professor, and Director of the Centre for Leadership and Innovation in the Faculty of Business at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Academy of Management Journal. He received his PhD from the University of Arkansas. His research has appeared or accepted for publication in consensus top-level journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organization Science, Strategic Management Journal, Organizational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology, in addition to practitioner-oriented outlets such as the Harvard Business Review, Compensation and Benefits Review, and World at Work Journal. His research interests include turnover patterns, team effectiveness, and the psychology of financial incentives. He is currently the lead investigator on the IMPACT Project, a global study of reactions to pay changes.

    Lynn M. Shore is Chair and Professor of Management at Colorado State University. Her research areas are the employee–organization relationship and work force diversity and inclusion. She has published numerous articles in such journals as Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, and Journal of Applied Psychology. Dr Shore served as Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology.

    Piers Steel is Professor in the Human Resources and Organizational Dynamics area and is the Distinguished Research Chair in Advanced Business Leadership at the Canadian Centre for Advanced Leadership in Business at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary. Dr Piers’ particular areas of research interest include meta-analysis methodology, personnel selection, culture and motivation, especially procrastination. He is the recipient of several international rewards, including the Raymond A. Katzell Award in I-O Psychology and the George A. Miller Award, given to the best article in psychology in the preceding five years. His work has been published in the premier journals in the social sciences, including Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology and Academy of Management Review.

    Greg L. Stewart is the Mary H. Bell Chair in Leadership at the University of Iowa. He serves as the Director of the VHA VISN 23 PACT Demonstration Laboratory. He received a BS from Brigham Young University and a PhD from Arizona State University. He has published numerous articles related to designing work teams and team leadership. He also conducts research related to organizational staffing, including an emphasis on understanding how individual traits relate to work performance. His research articles have appeared in leading academic journals including Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, and Journal of Management.

    Linn Van Dyne received her PhD from the University of Minnesota with a concentration in Strategic Management and Organization. Van Dyne is an Associate Editor for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes and is on the editorial boards of Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Human Relations, Management and Organizational Review, and Organizational Psychology Review. She has published in Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Research in Organizational Behavior, and other scholarly outlets. She is a member of the Academy of Management, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and she is a Fellow in the Society of Organizational Behavior.

    Sidni A. Vaughn is a PhD student in the Industrial Organizational Psychology program at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include teams, social networks, social influence, and multiteam systems.

    Amy Wax is doctoral candidate in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include team diversity and assembly, and social network analysis. Amy was awarded a National Science Foundation East Asia and Pacific Summer Research Fellowship to conduct her dissertation research on online gaming teams in China. In the fall, Amy will be joining the faculty of the Psychology Department at California State University, Long Beach.

    Justin M. Weinhardt is Associate Professor in the Organizational Behaviour and Human Resources at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary. Justin's particular areas of research interest include computational modeling, dynamic motivation and decision making, multilevel theory and mental illness at work. His research has been published in premier journals such as Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Operations Management, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Organizational Research Methods.

    Lingtao Yu is Assistant Professor in the Organizational Behavior and Human Resources Division at Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia. He received his PhD in Business Administration (OBHR) from Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota. His research interests include leadership and ethics, workplace deviance, emotions, and mindfulness. His research has been published in Academy of Management Journal.

    Hannes Zacher Professor of Work and Organizational Psychology at the University of Leipzig (Germany) and Adjunct Professor in the School of Management at Queensland University of Technology (Australia). He received his PhD in 2009 from the University of Giessen (Germany). His research program investigates sustainability in and of organizations, with foci on successful aging at work, career development, and occupational well-being; action regulation, innovation, proactivity, leadership, and entrepreneurship; and pro-environmental employee behavior. He is an Honorary Research Fellow at the Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College and member of the editorial boards of Group & Organization Management, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and Work, Aging and Retirement.

    Preface

    The Global Science and Practice of IWO Psychology

    From scientific management to the human relations movement, from cottage industries to craft guilds, from the industrial age to the information society, the issues that have dominated the field of industrial, work and organizational (IWO) psychology have changed over the years. Toward the end of the second decade of the twenty-first century, IWO psychology is a global science and arena for professional practice. Our original, bestselling two-volume Handbook of IWO Psychology (2001) is now a three-volume set that reflects the strides in the field, both in substantive content, expanding knowledge, and evidence-based application. The changes and developments since 2001 have been so fundamental and sweeping that all the chapters in these three volumes are brand new. In preparing these volumes, we have rejected the idea of merely updating the previous version’s chapters with new references and some new content. Instead, we have commissioned chapters that better reflect the current subdomains in the field and incorporate the developments of the past decade and half from the ground up. We have also sought authors with fresh and contemporary perspectives, as it is our hope that the present three-volume set will take IWO psychology to the second quarter of the twenty-first century.

    Nonetheless, our overarching objectives in this second edition have remained (1) to cover recent research on work and organizational psychology by leading experts around the globe and (2) to develop psychology of work that is applicable globally. Personnel Psychology and Employee Performance volume, primarily focuses on individuals in organizations and covers personnel psychology issues. Organizational Psychology volume primarily covers organizational psychology topics. Managerial Psychology and Organizational Approaches volume highlights areas of interest in managerial psychology, with coverage of broader, strategic topics and concerns.

    It was our intention, as editors of this Handbook, to produce a globally contributed, globally oriented, and globally relevant collection of chapters which comprehensively covered the major and vibrant topics comprising our field into the second quarter of the twenty-first century. We recognize and learn from manifest cross-cultural, socio-economic, and historical differences. But what we stated in the preface of our first edition is still true:

    We were equally determined not to allow a drift downward into parochial, single nation, local issues and perspectives to dominate this Handbook. The very title, The Handbook of Industrial, Work and Organizational (IWO) Psychology reflects these aspirations on the part of the editors. Credit is due to our esteemed colleague Paul Sackett who proposed this globally-focused title as a combination of Industrial-Organizational (I-O) Psychology in the USA, and Work and Organizational (W/O) Psychology in Europe and other countries ­worldwide.

    In the past two decades, IWO psychology has become a field of global science and professional practice. Global psychology of work thrives: IWO research is not solely conducted and published by those in North America and Europe. Knowledge is generated, replicated, and disseminated worldwide. The choice of research questions reflects both the global and regional zeitgeists and concerns. The scientific research methods utilized are universal. But, perhaps most importantly, findings of generalization and regional specificity are rigorously tested with regularity. These developments have shifted the perceptual, analytical, and disciplinary boundaries of IWO psychology forever away from the parochial. International concerns and challenges are attended to in all sub areas of IWO psychology.

    With regard to the practice of IWO psychology, alongside this diversification of scientific focus toward a global conceptualization of the discipline, changes in the practice of organizational psychology have also taken on an increasingly global shape and size. There is greater collaboration and sharing of expertise across countries in IWO psychology. Global consultancies dominate the market with their multinational presence and practice. Consequently, IWO psychology has standardized practices across national boundaries.

    The chapters in these volumes are geared to consolidate IWO concepts and knowledge on topics studied by IWO psychologists, drawing upon research and practice from across the globe. Hopefully, they reflect and satisfy the demands of a global science and practice of industrial, work, and organizational psychology for many years to come.

    Handan Kepir SinangilIstanbulDeniz S. OnesMinneapolisChockalingam ViswesvaranMiamiNeil AndersonLondon

    Acknowledgments

    Preparing a major, globally relevant, three-volume Handbook of Industrial, Work and Organizational (IWO) Psychology required much collaboration and effort from everyone involved. First and foremost, thanks are due to the co-editors of these volumes for making this second edition possible. We have great respect and admiration for each other and cannot imagine a better editorial team. Between the first edition and this much expanded second edition, we have collaborated for exactly 20 years, providing each with other intellectual challenge and social support. Each editor’s contribution was somewhat different for this second edition. The chapter reviews were handled by Viswesvaran, Anderson, and Ones. Strategic decisions benefited from Anderson’s leadership. Content benefited from Viswesvaran’s vast expertise and keen awareness of important developments. Structure of the volumes and administrative details were handled by Ones.

    For the actualization of the Handbook with 69 chapters across three volumes, our gratitude goes to over 100 eminent authors across from over two dozen countries. They accepted our invitation with enthusiasm and devoted a considerable amount of effort to this project. Not only did they produce outstanding chapters, but they also were timely with their revisions, although the publication of the volumes were delayed due to reasons beyond their or our control.

    The volume of administrative work on this undertaking was much greater than the first edition. Our editorial assistant Melissa Kellen at the University of Minnesota’s Psychology Department, where our Administrative Headquarters was located, was more helpful and important for this project than anyone will ever realize. Her efficiency, professionalism, and enthusiasm made our editorial work a little easier and a little less distressing. Partial financial support for the Handbook editorial office came from Ones’ Hellervik Chair and Distinguished McKnight University Professor research funds at the University of Minnesota.

    We also would like to extend our sincerest thanks to the Sage (publishing) team. During the various phases of the Handbook, we have had to work with many different Sage publishing editors and their teams; they all were helpful. As the volumes took shape, our colleagues and students at our respective institutions also provided valuable support. In this regard, I cannot overstate the intellectual stimulation, assistance, and care that I received from my past and current doctoral advisees. Thank you!

    Those closest to us perhaps gave the most and suffered the greatest during the completion of this project. To them, we offer genuine apologies for the neglect they had to endure and for the encouragement they nonetheless provided, while we labored long hours during nights and weekends. In this, I especially would like to acknowledge the encouragement and support of my daughter Daria Haner.

    We can only hope that the sacrifices made in the preparation of these three volumes will be balanced by the good that they will do for the science and practice of IWO psychology. The ultimate measure of our success will be if the research presented in these volumes can improve the productive work lives of millions around the world.

    On behalf of the Handbook Editors

    Deniz S. OnesMinneapolisMarch 2017

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