The SAGE Handbook of Industrial, Work and Organizational Psychology: Personnel Psychology and Employee Performance

Handbooks

Deniz S. Ones, Neil Anderson, Chockalingam Viswesvaran & Handan Kepir Sinangil

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  • Part I: PROFESSIONAL CONTEXT: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    Part II: INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR AT WORK

    Part III: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AND CAPABILITIES

    Part IV: STAFFING, DECISION MAKING AND TRAINING

  • Copyright

    List of Figures

    List of Tables

    Notes on the Editors and Contributors

    The Editors

    Deniz S. Ones is Professor of Psychology, the holder of both the Hellervik Professorship of Industrial Psychology and the Distinguished McKnight University Professorship at the University of Minnesota. She also holds the prestigious title of Distinguished University Teaching Professor, based on her doctoral student mentoring and training of world-class industrial-organizational psychologists. Several of her students have won best dissertation and early career contributions awards. Her research, published in more than 175 articles and book chapters, focuses on assessment of individual differences for employee selection and measurement of personality, integrity, and cognitive ability constructs for the prediction of job performance, especially counterproductive work behaviors. Her research has been cited over 15,000 times in the scientific literature. Her current H-index is 60 (H-index is the largest number H such that H publications have at least H citations). She has studied and served on research projects and blue ribbon panels focusing on assessment and job performance of law enforcement personnel, engineers, managers (including C-suite executives), astronauts, nurses, politicians, and research and development teams, among many others. In 2012, she received the Association for Test Publisher's (ATP) Lifetime Professional Career Contributions and Service to Testing Award. She is ranked in the top 100 most influential management scholars in the past three decades (Aguinis et al. in Academy of Management Perspectives, 26(2), 2012) as well as ranked in the top 15 most influential management scholars in the world who have received their PhD in the past 20 years. She is ranked in the top ten most-cited authors in popular Industrial-Organizational (I-O) psychology textbooks (highest ranked woman).

    Neil Anderson is Professor of HRM and Director of Research (Work and Organization Research Centre) at Brunel University London. Neil is also Director of the Leverhulme Trust funded international centre for research into workplace creativity and innovation research. He conducts research into innovation and well-being, personnel selection, applicant reactions, and the science–practice divide in industrial, work, and organizational psychology. He is the Founding Editor of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment and his work has appeared in several outlets including Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, and Personnel Psychology. Neil has published a number of edited handbooks in these areas and is a Fellow of the BPS, SIOP, APA, IAAP, and an Academic Fellow of the CIPD. He has advised several organizations in the UK, Europe and the USA on best practice across these topic areas.

    Chockalingam Viswesvaran received his PhD from the University of Iowa and is Professor of Psychology at Florida International University, Miami. His research focuses on personnel selection, job performance assessments, and personality testing. He has served on several editorial boards including those of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Personnel Psychology, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. He was an associate editor of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment from 2001 to 2006 and served as its Editor for ten years (2007–2017). He has received the best dissertation award and the early career distinguished scientific contributions award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). He is a Fellow of of the American Psychological Association Divisions 5 (Evaluation, Measurement, and Statistics) and 14 (SIOP), and the Association for Psychological Science (APS). He has co-edited a special issue of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment on the role of technology on staffing, and a special issue of the journal Human Performance on the use of cognitive ability tests. He has served on the awards and fellowship committees of SIOP and on the APA Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessments. He has published over 170 journal articles and has made 250 conference presentations besides six edited volumes.

    Handan Kepir Sinangil is Professor Emerita of Work and Organizational Psychology at Marmara University, Organizational Behaviour Graduate Program, and Adjunct Professor Emerita at Bogazici University. She has served as the General Secretary of European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). She is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP, APA Division 14), the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP), and the International Association of Cross- Cultural Psychology (IACCP). Dr Sinangil's international and national publications exceed 70 as book chapters and conference papers. She also served as Associate Editor of International Journal of Selection and Assessment. Her ongoing research projects, either with international collaboration or alone include expatriate management, organizational culture and change, and performance appraisal and selection.

    The Contributors

    Sara M. Ahmed is Lecturer in Organizational Behaviour and Human Resource Management (OB-HRM) at University of Surrey, UK. She received an MSc in HRM and a PhD degree in HRM-OB from Brunel University, where she was working as a research assistant and won several awards. Before joining Surrey, Sara held a position as a Lecturer in OB-HRM at Brunel University in London, UK. Sara's main research interest focuses on how applicant justice/fairness perceptions influence their job attitudes and behaviors, well-being, and self-perceptions, as well as the determinants of their fairness reactions. She has a keen interest in organizational justice in the context of personnel selection and promotion, new technology in personnel selection (e.g., Internet-based techniques), and cross-country/cultural examination of applicant reactions. Her research has been published in refereed international journals such as Journal of Management and International Journal of Selection and Assessment.

    Talya N. Bauer is the Cameron Professor of Management at Portland State University, Oregon. Her PhD is from Purdue University, Indiana. She conducts research about relationships at work. More specifically, she works in the areas of new hire onboarding, recruitment, selection, overqualification, mentoring, and leadership which have resulted in numerous journal publications published in outlets such as the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Academy of Management Perspectives, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, and Personnel Psychology. She is the former Editor of the Journal of Management. In addition, she serves on the editorial boards for Personnel Psychology, Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, Journal of Management, Africa Journal of Management, and Oxford Research Reviews: Business and Management. She currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology. Her work has been discussed in several media outlets including the The New York Times, Businessweek, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, and NPR's All Things Considered. She has worked with dozens of government, Fortune 1000, and start-up organizations and has been a Visiting Scholar in France, Spain, and at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, California.

    Margaret E. Beier is Associate Professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Rice University, Houston, Texas. She received her BA from Colby College, Maine, and her MS and PhD degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. Margaret's research examines the influence of individual differences in age, gender, abilities, and motivation as related to success in educational and organizational environments. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and published in outlets such as Educational Psychology, Psychology and Aging, Psychological Bulletin, the Journal of Applied Psychology, and the Journal of Business and Psychology. She is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) and the Association for Psychological Science (APS).

    Gerhard Blickle is Professor of Industrial & Organizational Psychology at the University of Bonn, Germany. He received a PhD in Psychology from the University of Heidelberg. He has research interests in the areas of micro political processes in organizations, leadership, mentoring, personality, and job performance. He has published his research in journals such as the Journal of Management, Journal of Organizational Behavior, The Leadership Quarterly, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Applied Psychology: An International Review, Group & Organization Management, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, European Journal of Psychological Assessment, and Journal of Language and Social Psychology. He has served as editor of leading German journals in I&O psychology, and was a member to the Psychology Board of the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), the German national science foundation.

    John P. Campbell is currently Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. He has served as President of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Chair of the Department of Psychology, Director of Graduate Studies in Psychology at Minnesota, and Director of the I-O Psychology PhD Program. In 2006 he received the American Psychological Association Lifetime Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Psychology; and in 2015 he received the University of Minnesota Distinguished Teacher Postbaccalaureate, Graduate, and Professional Teaching Award. From 1982–1994 he was the principal scientist for a series of studies sponsored by the US Army Research Institute directed at the development of selection and classification systems (aka Project A). He was the first author (1970, McGraw-Hill) of Managerial Behavior, Performance, and Effectiveness (with M. Dunnette, E. Lawler, and K. Weick), a citation classic; as well as a recent chapter (with B. Wiernik) in the second volume of the Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior (2015), entitled ‘The modeling and assessment of performance at work'. Numeric literacy suggests the developmental span was 45 years.

    Dongwon Choi is Assistant Professor of People and Organizations at NEOMA Business School. He received his PhD from National University of Singapore. His research interests include group processes, work design, and positive workplace behaviors including prosociality, proactivity, and creativity.

    Brian S. Connelly is Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources at the University of Toronto Scarborough and the Rotman School of Management, and the Canada Research Chair in Integrative Perspectives in Personality. He received his PhD from the University of Minnesota in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. His research examines how organizations can best use personality measures to solve workplace challenges, particularly in employee selection and development. In current and ongoing research, he has used personality ratings from others (e.g. peers, friends, or family) to study the limitations of self-knowledge, how first impressions are formed, the way people ‘fake’ personality measures, and the structure of personality. His research has been supported by the Canada Research Chairs program, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, an Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation Early Researcher Award, and the College Board. This research has been published in Psychological Bulletin, Psychological Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Personnel Psychology.

    Stephan Dilchert is Associate Professor of Management at the Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, City University of New York, the largest collegiate business school in the US. His research focuses on the role of personality, intelligence, and other human capital variables in determining creativity, performance, and counterproductive behaviors among employees. He frequently publishes in leading peer-reviewed journals in psychology and management and has received numerous awards from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the Human Resources Research Organization, the Eastern Academy of Management, and the International Personnel Assessment Council, among others. He has served on several editorial boards of scientific journals and is the current Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Selection and Assessment. In addition to research, Stephan consults for US and international multinational corporations to develop cutting-edge recruitment and talent management systems. He has served as an expert for establishing guidelines on background checks, cybervetting, and integrity assessment for various law enforcement and government entities in the US and Europe, as well as public companies in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. In addition to a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Minnesota, he holds SPHR certification from the Human Resources Certification Institute as well as SHRM-SCP certification from the Society for Human Resource Management.

    Gerald R. Ferris is the Francis Eppes Professor of Management, Professor of Psychology, and Professor of Sport Management at Florida State University. He received a PhD in Business Administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has research interests in the areas of social influence processes in human resources systems. Author of numerous articles published in such journals as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personnel Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, and Academy of Management Review, he also served as editor of the annual series, Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management, from 1981–2003. He has been the recipient of a number of distinctions and honors: In 2001, he was the recipient of the Heneman Career Achievement Award, and in 2010, he received the Thomas A. Mahoney Mentoring Award, both from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management.

    Rachel E. Frieder (PhD) is Assistant Professor of Management within the Strome College of Business, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia. Her primary research interests involve how individuals get ahead at work with an emphasis on topics such as organizational politics, social influence processes, constructive and destructive forms of leadership, and relational dynamics. She has published her research in journals such as the Journal of Management, The Leadership Quarterly, and Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

    Casey Giordano is a doctoral student in the Industrial-Organizational Psychology program at the University of Minnesota. He studies counterproductive work behaviors, individual differences, and psychometrics. He has presented his research at national and international conferences and applied his work to non-profit and municipal organizations. He is a member of the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology, the Academy of Management, and European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology.

    Jessica Grazi, head of the Personnel Development Division at Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany), is concerned with the conception, implementation, and evaluation of strategic personnel development measures for various groups of employees within the university. At the same time she is completing her PhD at the Department of Work and Organizational Psychology at Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany). She has studied Psychology in Germany, the Netherlands, and Israel and has held a teaching position in research methods at the University Bielefeld (Germany). Her PhD project addresses the impact of supervisory leadership behaviours and followers’ personality on the display of typical versus maximum performance. Past research has been published in Human Performance.

    Jo-Ida C. Hansen (PhD, University of Minnesota) is Professor Emerita of Psychology and Director of the Center for Interest Measurement Research at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on vocational psychology and career development and more specifically on the assessment of vocational and leisure interests. She served as Editor of the Journal of Counseling Psychology and of Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), and of the American Counseling Association (ACA). She has served on the Board of Scientific Affairs of APA, chaired the APA Council of Editors, and served on the Committee to revise the 1999 and 2014 Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. She is co-editor with Elizabeth Altmaier of the The Oxford Handbook of Counseling Psychology and an Associate Editor for the APA Handbook of Testing and Assessment in Psychology. She is a recipient of the Leona Tyler Award, counseling psychology's highest honor, the Society of Counseling Psychology's Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award, the Society of Vocational Psychology's Distinguished Achievement Award, the E. K. Strong Gold Medal for Exemplary Vocational Interest Research, and the American Counseling Association's Extended Research Award.

    Michael B. Harari (PhD, Florida International University) is an Assistant Professor of Management at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton. His research focuses on job performance, individual differences in personality, personnel selection, and motivation and has been published in outlets including the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Human Resource Management Review, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, and Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory.

    Scott Highhouse is Professor and Ohio Eminent Scholar in the Department of Psychology at Bowling Green State University, Ohio. He is Founding Editor of the journal Personnel Assessment and Decisions, and currently serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Psychology and Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. He has been named a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology. Scott is currently interested in better understanding employer and professional resistance to decision aids for improving hiring decisions.

    Jason L. Huang is Assistant Professor in the School of Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University. He received his PhD in Organizational Psychology from Michigan State University. His research interest focuses on individuals’ adaptation to their work experience. More specific areas of interest include personality's influence on adaptive performance at work, training processes and subsequent transfer of training to novel contexts and tasks, and cultural influences on individual-level work phenomena. He also conducts methodological research on insufficient effort responding. He has published his research in outlets such as the Psychological Bulletin, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Journal of Management. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Vocational Behavior and Journal of Business and Psychology.

    Ute R. Hülsheger is Associate Professor of Work and Organizational Psychology at Maastricht University in The Netherlands. She holds a PhD in Psychology from Bielefeld University, Germany and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Amsterdam Business School, The Netherlands. She is interested in how individuals can address the daily demands of work effectively, while remaining healthy and satisfied with their work. She studies occupational health-related topics including emotional labor, recovery from work, and the role of mindfulness for employee health and well-being. Ute's work has been funded by the German Academic Exchange Service, the Educational Testing Service (ETS), and SIOP. It has been published in journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. She currently serves on various editorial boards, including the Journal of Applied Psychology and Journal of Business and Psychology.

    Remus Ilies is Professor of Management at The National University of Singapore (NUS) Business School. Before moving to NUS in 2011, he was the Gary Valade Research Fellow and Professor of Management in the Eli Broad Graduate School of Management and an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University. He received his doctorate in Organizational Behavior/Human Resource Management from the University of Florida and earned a MBA from Iowa State University. His research examines numerous areas related to human resources and organizational behavior, such as personality, leadership, motivation, job attitudes, moods and emotions, and citizenship behaviors. This work has been published in premier scholarly journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, The Leadership Quarterly, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology. He has also received several national awards, including the Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (2008), the Early Career Achievement Award from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management (2010), and the Cummings Scholarly Achievement Award, recognizing an early- to mid-career scholar, from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy.

    Dustin K. Jundt is Associate Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at Saint Louis University, Missouri. He earned his PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Michigan State University in 2009. His research interests include individual and team adaptive performance, self-regulation, and team effectiveness. His work has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals including the Academy of Management Journal, Annual Review of Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Applied Psychology: An International Review, Human Resource Management Review, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Ute-Christine Klehe, Chair of Work and Organizational Psychology at Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany), received her PhD in 2003 from the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (Canada). She has since then worked at the Universities of Zürich (Switzerland) and Amsterdam (Netherlands). Besides serving on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Business and Psychology, and Journal of Managerial Psychology, she has served as an associate editor of Applied Psychology: An International Review. Her research addresses personnel selection and performance as well as career self-management in the face of career transitions. It has been published in outlets such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Organizational Behavior and others.

    Jack W. Kostal is a doctoral candidate in the Industrial/Organizational Psychology program at the University of Minnesota. His research interests focus on talent management, including the acquisition, development, and retention of human capital. More specific interests include personnel selection, training, expert performance, performance modeling, performance dynamics, and psychometrics/statistical methods. His research has been published in both I/O and Applied Measurement journals. He has received the Flanagan Award for Outstanding Student Contribution and the Best International Paper Award at past SIOP conferences.

    Nathan R. Kuncel is the Marvin D. Dunnette Distinguished Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology and a McKnight Presidential Fellow at the University of Minnesota where he also earned his doctorate. Prior to returning to the University of Minnesota he was faculty at the University of Illinois. Nathan's research generally focuses on how individual characteristics (intelligence, personality, interests) influence subsequent work, academic, and life success as well as efforts to model and measure success. Recently his research has examined the meaning and measurement of critical thinking, effective measurement of inter and intrapersonal characteristics, and the effects of judgment and decision making on the utility of admissions and hiring decisions. His research has appeared in Science, Harvard Business Review, Psychological Bulletin, Review of Educational Research, Psychological Science, Perspectives on Psychological Science, among others. He edited the Industrial and Organizational section of the three-volume APA Handbook of Testing and Assessment in Psychology. Nathan is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. He received the Anne Anastasi Award from the American Psychological Association Division 5, the Cattell Research Award from the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and the Jeanneret Award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    Xian Li is Senior Vice President in China Huarong Asset Management Co. Ltd. He obtained his PhD in Management from NUS School of Business, National University of Singapore in 2014. He has research interests in leadership and job recruitment.

    Rodney L. Lowman (PhD, ABAP) is Distinguished Professor and Program Director, Organizational Psychology Programs, California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, San Diego. He is also President of Lowman & Richardson/Consulting Psychologists. His PhD in psychology (I-O and clinical) is from Michigan State University. He is the author or editor of 13 books, has published over 130 peer-reviewed articles and chapters, and has made hundreds of professional presentations all over the world. He is Fellow of the American Psychological Association's Divisions 1 (General Psychology), 12 (Society of Clinical Psychology), 13 (Society of Consulting Psychology), 14 (Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology), 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology), and 52 (International). His books include: An Introduction to Consulting Psychology: Working with Individuals, Groups, and Organizations, Internationalizing Multiculturalism: Expanding Professional Competencies in a Globalized World, The Ethical Practice of Psychology in Organizations (2nd Edition), Handbook of Organizational Consulting Psychology, The Clinical Practice of Career Assessment: Interests, Abilities, Personality, and Counseling & Psychotherapy of Work Dysfunctions and (with Stewart Cooper) The Ethical Practice of Consulting Psychology..

    Julie M. McCarthy is Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management at the University of Toronto Scarborough and the Rotman School of Management. Her PhD is in Industrial-Organizational Psychology (2003) and her primary area of research is in the realm of personnel selection, with a focus on job applicant reactions to standardized selection tests. She also investigates the broader construct of employee well-being, concentrating on the reduction of workplace anxiety and the enhancement of work recovery. Her work is generously supported by funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and is published in outlets such as the Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Personnel Psychology. She currently sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology and the Journal of Business and Psychology. In the corporate sector, Julie has developed performance management systems, personnel selection tools, and training programs.

    Brittany K. Mercado is Assistant Professor of Management at the Love School of Business, Elon University, North Carolina. Her research focuses on predicting and conceptualizing counterproductive work behaviors. She also has a strong interest in measurement issues and bias in employment decisions. Her most recent projects focus on the assessment and reduction of employee counterproductivity involving information and communications technology (cyber-CWB). In her applied work, she supports organizations’ personnel selection and employee assessment efforts, most notably with the development, adaptation, and validation of pre-employment inventories and performance measures. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals, and she is a frequent presenter at international conferences, including the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and Academy of Management. She holds a PhD in Management from the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College, City University of New York, an International MBA from Florida International University, and SHRM-CP certification from the Society for Human Resource Management.

    Mindy K. Shoss is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Florida. She also serves as Professorial Fellow at the Centre for Sustainable Human Resource Management at Australian Catholic University. Her research focuses on work stress, counterproductive work behavior, job insecurity, adaptability, and interpersonal interactions at work. She is also interested in the impact of economic conditions and the changing nature of work on employee well-being and behavior. Her work has appeared in such outlets as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Human Resource Management Review.

    Jo Silvester is Professor of Organizational Psychology and Deputy Dean at Cass Business School, City, University of London. Her research investigates diversity and leadership emergence, performance in political roles, and politicians’ shared understanding of effective political leadership. Recent projects sponsored by UK central and local government, political parties, and the Economic and Social Research Council include studies investigating the impact of party selection procedures on candidate diversity, psychological and behavioral predictors of electoral success, and the socialization of newly elected Members of Parliament in the UK, New Zealand and Iceland. Her research has been published in Journal of Applied Psychology, Human Relations, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, British Journal of Psychology, International Journal of Selection and Assessment, and Political Behavior. She has been an Associate Editor for the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

    Zhaoli Song is Associate Professor in the Department of Management and Organization, NUS School of Business, National University of Singapore. He obtained his PhD in Industrial and Human Resources Management from the University of Minnesota on 2004. He has research expertise on topics such as behavior genetics, job search and re-employment, leadership, work–family balance, and emotion. He has published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Human Relations, Journal of Vocational Behaviors, and The Leadership Quarterly.

    Matthias Spitzmuller is Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Smith School of Business, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. His research focuses on organizational citizenship behaviors, helping behaviors, and team motivation. His research investigates these topics on different levels of analysis, with a special interest in the social dynamics that determine the emergence and the consequences of helping behaviors at work. His research has been published in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Kevin C. Stanek is a researcher focused on understanding individual differences and how they relate to behavior, cognition, and outcomes in the workplace and in life more broadly. Fundamentally, his research aims to decipher and predict human behavior. His work ranges from the investigation of counterproductive behavior across life domains to the genetics of job satisfaction, and it has been used to design selection systems, improve meta-analytic methodologies, and connect disparate literatures and disciplines. He earned his doctorate in Individual Differences and Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the University of Minnesota, his Master's in Behavioral Genetics at the University of Minnesota, and Bachelor's degrees in Economics and Psychology at the University of Southern California. Kevin works at a Fortune 100 company managing human capital analytics and research. Additionally, he consults with organizations on personnel issues, such as talent management research, retention prediction, and employee experience design.

    Donald M. Truxillo is Professor of Psychology at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. His work examines issues related to personnel selection, applicant reactions, older workers, and occupational health and safety. He has published over 80 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. He currently serves on the editorial boards of 8 peer-reviewed journals. He served as Associate Editor for the Journal of Management and is currently an Associate Editor at Work, Aging and Retirement. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, the International Association for Applied Psychology, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). His research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and he has received Fulbright Scholarships to visit the University of Trento (Italy) and ISCTE-IUL (Lisbon, Portugal). He serves as a doctoral school committee member at the University of Trento, and he has also been a visiting scholar at the University of Zurich (Switzerland), University of Valencia (Spain), University of Bologna (Italy), and University of Palermo (Italy).

    Anton J. Villado is the Chief People Officer at RestaurantOwner.com. He earned his BA and MS degrees from California State University, San Bernardino, and his PhD from Texas A&M University. His research interests fall within the domains of employee selection and assessment, training and development, and team dynamics. He has received funding and support for his research from the US Air Force, Wonderlic Inc., and Texas A&M University. His work has been published in various outlets, including the Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Business and Psychology, and Human Resource Management Review. He is a member of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the Association for Psychological Science.

    Brenton M. Wiernik is Assistant Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the University of South Florida. His research focuses on the measurement and application of individual differences, including vocational interests, personality traits, and cognitive abilities, for understanding how individuals develop and change throughout their working lives. He studies individual differences’ contributions to career adaptation, as well as employee responses to changing work demands, such as changing needs to promote environmental sustainability through work behavior. Wiernik also actively works to develop new quantitative methods for psychometric assessment and meta-analysis. His work has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Vocational Behavior, Career Development International, Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, Multivariate Behavioral Research, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Journal of Managerial Psychology, as well as numerous edited scholarly books. Wiernik was the lead editor of Managing Expatriates: Success Factors in Private and Public Domains and serves on editorial boards of the Journal of Managerial Psychology, the Journal of Environmental Psychology, and the International Journal of Selection and Assessment.

    Michael P. Wilmot is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Management at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He received his PhD (2017) in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on the assessment and application of personality and individual differences in organizational settings. Other interests include status, leadership, and meta-analytic methods. He has published his work in journals such as the Journal of Personality, European Journal of Personality, Assessment, Psychological Assessment, and Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    Madeleine Wyatt is Senior Lecturer in Human Resource Management and Organizational Behaviour at the University of Kent, UK. Her research examines employees’ progression to leadership positions, with a focus on diversity and the role of informal and political behavior in the workplace. She also studies political leadership and politicians as political workers. Her research has been published in the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Human Relations, and International Small Business Journal.

    Carmen K. Young is Organizational Research and Analytics Specialist at Marriott International. She earned her BS in Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her MA and PhD degrees in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Rice University. Her research focuses on individual differences and training, particularly in the areas of aging, active learning, self-regulation, and training design.

    Don C. Zhang is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He received his PhD in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Bowling Green State University and his BS from Michigan State University. His research interests include judgment and decision making, data visualization, employee assessment, and individual differences in the workplace. His research has been published in the Journal of Behavioral and Decision Making, Personality and Individual Differences, and Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice.

    Preface

    The Global Science and Practice of IWO Psychology

    From scientific management to the human relations movement, from cottage industries to craft guilds, from the industrial age to the information society, the issues that have dominated the field of industrial, work, and organizational (IWO) psychology have changed over the years. Toward the end of the second decade of the twenty-first century, IWO psychology is a global science and arena for professional practice. Our original, bestselling two-volume Handbook of IWO Psychology (2001) is now a three-volume set that reflects the strides in the field, both in substantive content, expanding knowledge, and evidence-based application. The changes and developments since 2001 have been so fundamental and sweeping that all the chapters in these three volumes are brand new. In preparing these volumes, we have rejected the idea of merely updating the previous version’s chapters with new references and some new content. Instead, we have commissioned chapters that better reflect the current subdomains in the field and incorporate the developments of the past decade and half from the ground up. We have also sought authors with fresh and contemporary perspectives, as it is our hope that the present three-volume set will take IWO psychology to the second quarter of the twenty-first century.

    Nonetheless, our overarching objectives in this second edition have remained (1) to cover recent research on work and organizational psychology by leading experts around the globe and (2) to develop psychology of work that is applicable globally. The Personnel Psychology and Employee Performance volume primarily focuses on individuals in organizations and covers personnel psychology issues. The Organizational Psychology volume primarily covers organizational psychology topics. The Managerial Psychology and Organizational Approaches volume highlights areas of interest in managerial psychology, with coverage of broader, strategic topics and concerns.

    It was our intention, as editors of this Handbook, to produce a globally contributed, globally oriented, and globally relevant collection of chapters which comprehensively covered the major and vibrant topics comprising our field into the second quarter of the twenty-first century. We recognize and learn from manifest cross-cultural, socio-economic, and historical differences. But what we stated in the preface of our first edition is still true:

    We were equally determined not to allow a drift downward into parochial, single nation, local issues and perspectives to dominate this Handbook. The very title, The Handbook of Industrial, Work and Organizational (IWO) Psychology reflects these aspirations on the part of the editors. Credit is due to our esteemed colleague Paul Sackett who proposed this globally-focused title as a combination of Industrial-Organizational (I-O) Psychology in the USA, and Work and Organizational (W/O) Psychology in Europe and other countries ­worldwide.

    In the past two decades, IWO psychology has become a field of global science and professional practice. Global psychology of work thrives: IWO research is not solely conducted and published by those in North America and Europe. Knowledge is generated, replicated, and disseminated worldwide. The choice of research questions reflects both the global and regional zeitgeists and concerns. The scientific research methods utilized are universal. But, perhaps most importantly, findings of generalization and regional specificity are rigorously tested with regularity. These developments have shifted the perceptual, analytical, and disciplinary boundaries of IWO psychology forever away from the parochial. International concerns and challenges are attended to in all sub areas of IWO psychology.

    With regard to the practice of IWO psychology, alongside this diversification of scientific focus toward a global conceptualization of the discipline, changes in the practice of organizational psychology have also taken on an increasingly global shape and size. There is greater collaboration and sharing of expertise across countries in IWO psychology. Global consultancies dominate the market with their multinational presence and practice. Consequently, IWO psychology has standardized practices across national boundaries.

    The chapters in these volumes are geared to consolidate IWO concepts and knowledge on topics studied by IWO psychologists, drawing upon research and practice from across the globe. Hopefully, they reflect and satisfy the demands of a global science and practice of industrial, work, and organizational psychology for many years to come.

    Handan Kepir SinangilIstanbulDeniz S. OnesMinneapolisChockalingam ViswesvaranMiamiNeil AndersonLondon

    Acknowledgments

    Preparing a major, globally relevant, three-volume Handbook of Industrial, Work and Organizational (IWO) Psychology required much collaboration and effort from everyone involved. First and foremost, thanks are due to the co-editors of these volumes for making this second edition possible. We have great respect and admiration for each other and cannot imagine a better editorial team. Between the first edition and this much expanded second edition, we have collaborated for exactly 20 years, providing each other with intellectual challenge and social support. Each editor’s contribution was somewhat different for this second edition. The chapter reviews were handled by Viswesvaran, Anderson, and Ones. Strategic decisions benefited from Anderson’s leadership. Content benefited from Viswesvaran’s vast expertise and keen awareness of important developments. Structure of the volumes and administrative details were handled by Ones.

    For the actualization of the Handbook with 69 chapters across three volumes, our gratitude goes to over 100 eminent authors across over two dozen countries. They accepted our invitation with enthusiasm and devoted a considerable amount of effort to this project. Not only did they produce outstanding chapters, but they also were timely with their revisions, although the publication of the volumes was delayed due to reasons beyond their or our control.

    The volume of administrative work on this undertaking was much greater than the first edition. Our editorial assistant Melissa Kellen at the University of Minnesota’s Psychology Department, where our Administrative Headquarters was located, was more helpful and important for this project than anyone will ever realize. Her efficiency, professionalism, and enthusiasm made our editorial work a little easier and a little less distressing. Partial financial support for the Handbook editorial office came from Ones’ Hellervik Chair and Distinguished McKnight University Professor research funds at the University of Minnesota.

    We also would like to extend our sincerest thanks to the Sage (publishing) team. During the various phases of the Handbook, we have had to work with many different Sage publishing editors and their teams; they all were helpful. As the volumes took shape, our colleagues and students at our respective institutions also provided valuable support. In this regard, I cannot overstate the intellectual stimulation, assistance, and care that I received from my past and current doctoral advisees. Thank you!

    Those closest to us perhaps gave the most and suffered the greatest during the completion of this project. To them, we offer genuine apologies for the neglect they had to endure and for the encouragement they nonetheless provided, while we labored long hours during nights and weekends. In this, I especially would like to acknowledge the encouragement and support of my daughter Daria Haner.

    We can only hope that the sacrifices made in the preparation of these three volumes will be balanced by the good that they will do for the science and practice of IWO psychology. The ultimate measure of our success will be if the research presented in these volumes can improve the productive work lives of millions around the world.

    On behalf of the Handbook Editors,

    Deniz S. OnesMinneapolisMarch 2017

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