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Dennis Johannßen

In: The SAGE Handbook of Frankfurt School Critical Theory

Chapter 76: Humanism and Anthropology from Walter Benjamin to Ulrich Sonnemann

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Humanism and Anthropology from Walter Benjamin to Ulrich Sonnemann
Humanism and Anthropology from Walter Benjamin to Ulrich Sonnemann
Dennis Johannßen
Introduction

Over the course of the twentieth century, the notions of humanism and anthropology became increasingly problematic. From Walter Benjamin to Ulrich Sonnemann, the writers and philosophers associated with the Institute for Social Research accompanied this process in a distinctly critical fashion, yet with significantly different emphases. Between the mid 1910s and the late 1960s, they formulated a critical theory of society and culture that rejected the idea of an invariant human nature. At the same time, they studied the restrictions and limitations that repressive and antagonistic societies impose on the human being. Engaging with various philosophical currents from transcendental philosophy to Marxism, ...

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