Previous Chapter Chapter 9: What Stories Make Worlds, What Worlds Make Stories: Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake Next Chapter

Sam McBean

In: The SAGE Handbook of Feminist Theory

Chapter 9: What Stories Make Worlds, What Worlds Make Stories: Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

What Stories Make Worlds, What Worlds Make Stories: Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake
What stories make worlds, what worlds make stories: Margaret atwood's oryx and crake
SamMcBean
Introduction

In a contemporary context in which feminism has been described as turning away from the question of women and writing (see Gubar, 1998; Moi, 2008), Margaret Atwood – a prominent and prolific writer of stories voiced by women – pens Oryx and Crake (2003), her first novel not to feature a female narrator. Instead, Oryx, the main female character in the novel, continually refuses injunctions to produce a cohesive and ‘true’ life narrative, expressing instead a lack of interest in telling her story. Similar to how feminism's supposed retreat from the question of women and writing has been read as ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website