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Alice Sullivan & Lisa Calderwood

In: The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research: Two Volume Set

Chapter 19: Surveys: Longitudinal, Cross-sectional and Trend Studies

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Surveys: Longitudinal, Cross-sectional and Trend Studies
Surveys: Longitudinal, Cross-sectional and Trend Studies
Alice Sullivan Lisa Calderwood
Introduction

Survey research has made vital contributions to our understanding of social and educational questions. Seminal early contributions include Jean Floud's work with A. H. Halsey and F. M. Martin (Floud et al., 1956), which showed the way in which the selection of children for grammar school places was biased against working class children, and Douglas's (1964) study of children at primary school during the 1950s, which also emphasised the wastage of working class talent.

Quantitative research fell out of favour for a time, at least among British sociologists, during the 1970s. Cathie Marsh pointed out that criticism of surveys seemed to grow ...

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