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Cindy Blackstock & Nico Trocmé

In: Handbook for Working with Children and Youth: Pathways to Resilience across Cultures and Contexts

Chapter 7: Community-Based Child Welfare for Aboriginal Children: Supporting Resilience Through Structural Change

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Community-Based Child Welfare for Aboriginal Children: Supporting Resilience Through Structural Change
Community-based child welfare for aboriginal children: Supporting resilience through structural change
Cindy Blackstock Nico Trocmé

“Help Me,” wrote Richard Cardinal in I I his own blood while the 17-year-old A.A. Metis boy committed suicide after spending 13 years moving in and out of 28 foster homes, group homes, and shelters in Alberta (Obomsawin, 1986). Although Cardinal's death drew attention to the significant overrepresentation of Aboriginal1 children in state care, 20 years later, the problem has become far more serious, with Aboriginal children representing approximately 40% of the 76,000 children and youth placed in out-of-home care in Canada (Farris-Manning & Zandstra, 2003). Although there is a lack of information on placement trends for Aboriginal children off-reserve due ...

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