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Jacqueline McAdam-Crisp, Lewis Aptekar & Wanjiku Kironyo

In: Handbook for Working with Children and Youth: Pathways to Resilience across Cultures and Contexts

Chapter 5: The Theory of Resilience and its Application to Street Children in the Minority and Majority Worlds

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The Theory of Resilience and its Application to Street Children in the Minority and Majority Worlds
The theory of resilience and its application to street children in the minority and majority worlds
JacquelineMcAdam-Crisp
LewisAptekar
WanjikuKironyo

In the 1950s, children who had run away from home to the streets were classified in the DSM-III-R as having a mental disorder, a perception that focuses on a child's deficits as opposed to strengths (Demoskoff & Lauzer, 1994). Although this classification is no longer used, the idea is still prevalent that the behavior of a child that results in his or her presence on the street must be maladaptive. The media, police, courts, social workers, and the public perpetuate this sensationalist image of deviance globally (Aptekar, 2000; Le Roux, 1998; Scheper-Hughes & Hoffman, ...

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