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Sarah Elwood

In: The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Geography

Chapter 6: Mixed Methods: Thinking, Doing, and Asking in Multiple Ways

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Mixed Methods: Thinking, Doing, and Asking in Multiple Ways
Mixed methods: Thinking, doing, and asking in multiple ways
Introduction

The notion of mixing methods rests a bit uneasily alongside long-standing debates in geography that have sought to demarcate clear separations between quantitative and qualitative methods, or between positivist, humanist, post-structuralist, and other epistemological perspectives. At some moments, these discussions have questioned whether the discipline's defining forms of inquiry ought to focus upon the particularity or generality of spatial phenomena and patterns (Hartshorne, 1939; Schaefer, 1953). At other moments, geographers have disagreed about the appropriateness of quantitative and qualitative methods for describing or explaining a diversity of human spatial activities, experiences, and perceptions (Chorley and Haggett, 1967; Harvey, 1969; Buttimer, 1976; Tuan, 1976). Sometimes, attention has centered on ...

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