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Empirical and Theoretical Status of the Five-Factor Model of Personality Traits
Empirical and theoretical status of the five-factor model of personality traits

Progress sometimes seems elusive in psychology, where old methods such as the Rorschach endure despite decades of criticism (Costa and McCrae, 2005), and where new research is often based on passing fads (Fiske and Leyens, 1997) rather than cumulative findings. It is remarkable, therefore, when clear progress is made, and there are few more dramatic examples than the rise to dominance of the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality traits in the past quarter century. Before that time, trait psychology had endured a Thirty Years’ War of competing trait models, with Guilford, Cattell, and Eysenck only the most illustrious of the combatants. The discovery of ...

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