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Joseph N. Cappella & Darren M. Schreiber

In: The SAGE Handbook of Nonverbal Communication

Chapter 19: The Interaction Management Function of Nonverbal Cues: Theory and Research About Mutual Behavioral Influence in Face-to-Face Settings

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The Interaction Management Function of Nonverbal Cues: Theory and Research About Mutual Behavioral Influence in Face-to-Face Settings
The interaction management function of nonverbal cues: Theory and research about mutual behavioral influence in face-to-face settings

There are two important senses in which conversations are regulated. The more typical connotation of the word regulate implies that a person seeks intentionally to alter the content, tenor, or events of a conversation toward some preordained end. Regulation of this type exhibits control in the sense that actions are undertaken to achieve what one perceives to be an important need or purpose. Such conversational behaviors are sometimes called “deliberate.” The second sense assumes that regulation of interaction is more “automatic” (i.e., weighed less cognitively; for more on this topic, see Lakin, ...

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