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Judith A. Hall

In: The SAGE Handbook of Nonverbal Communication

Chapter 11: Women's and Men's Nonverbal Communication: Similarities, Differences, Stereotypes, and Origins

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Women's and Men's Nonverbal Communication: Similarities, Differences, Stereotypes, and Origins
Women's and men's nonverbal communication: Similarities, differences, stereotypes, and origins

Nonverbal cues are the “front lines” of contact between people. Information is conveyed via appearance, movement, and expression even before any words are spoken, and once the dialogue begins, a veritable torrent of cues is at the perceiver's disposal. People use nonverbal cues to draw first, and lasting, impressions about emotions, personality, character, and motives, as artists and novelists have always been aware. In turn, people know that their own nonverbal behavior is a primary vehicle by which they project their personas into the world. Thus, nonverbal behavior is a major medium of self-presentation (DePaulo, 1992; Keating, this volume). When presenting ourselves to the world, one ...

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