The SAGE Handbook of Human Resource Management

Handbooks

Edited by: Adrian Wilkinson, Nicolas Bacon, Tom Redman & Scott Snell

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Chapters
  • Front Matter
  • Subject Index
  • Part I: The Framing of Human Resource Management

    Part II: Fundamentals of Human Resource Management

    Part III: Contemporary Issues

    Part IV: Sectoral Perspectives

  • Copyright

    View Copyright Page

    Introduction

    The field of HRM continues to evolve in today's organizations, in part due to the economic, technological, and social realities that influence the nature of business. In a global economy, a wide range of factors—that vary from global sourcing and labor arbitrage to regional trade agreements and labor standards to cultural differences and sustainability to strategic alliances and innovation—all point to the vital nature of HRM. In large part this is because from a strategic standpoint, observers have noted that traditional sources of advantage such as access to capital, protected markets, or proprietary technologies are rapidly eroding, and that survival depends more often on the ability to innovate, adapt, and learn, and transfer that learning globally. As one might guess, these capabilities rest squarely on the management of people.

    But while few will argue against the premise thatHRMissues are critical in today's organizations, the mantra of ‘people are our most valuable asset’ has largely been a rhetorical one in most organizations; and the research evidence has often not backed it up (cf., Snell, Shadur, and Wright, 2002). Historically, organizations have not rested their fortunes on human resources. The HR function remains among the least influential in most organizations, and competitive strategies have not typically been based on the skills, capabilities, and behaviors of employees. In fact, the harsh reality is that labor is still often viewed merely as a cost to be minimized, particularly in tough times. Executives have more often tried to minimize the impact of employees on performance by substituting capital for labor where possible, and designing bureaucratic organizations that separate those who think from those who actually do the work (Snell, Youndt, and Wright, 1996).

    But there are some encouraging signs that much of this is changing. As Quinn (1992: 241) noted, ‘with rare exceptions, the economic and producing power of the firm lies more in its intellectual and service capabilities than in its hard assets.’And again, this clearly highlights the importance of human resource management.

    To explore how HRM is changing, and to examine best practice across its array of activities, we organize this chapter as follows. First, we present a 2 × 3 matrix that summarizes both micro- and macroperspectives on elements of HRM across: (a) a human focus, (b) a resource focus, and (c) a management focus. Second, we describe the structure of the book and how the individual chapters deal with the issues raised by this matrix of HRM perspectives.

    Adrian Wilkinson, Tom Redman, Scott A. Snell, and Nicolas Bacon

    Acknowledgements

    As with any book, the list of acknowledgements could be extensive, but what follows are the most important. Thanks to our editor and, as usual, our family and friends, who make the major contribution. We are grateful to the contributors' families for their support while the book was being written.

    Notes on Contributors

    Stephen Bach is Professor of Employment Relations at the Department of Management, King's College, University of London. His research focuses on public service HRM and changing workforce roles. His research interests include: international migration of health professionals; assistant roles in the public services; human resource management in the health sector and the future of public service trade unions. He is author of Employment Relations and the Health Service: The Management of Reforms, London: Routledge, 2004 and editor of Managing Human Resources: Personnel Management in Transition, 4th edition, Blackwell, 2005. He is a member of the Editorial Board of Personnel Review and Human Resources for Health. Stephen has acted as an advisor to the International Labour Organisation; Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development; World Health Organisation and the UN University.

    Nicolas Bacon is Professor of Human Resource Management, Nottingham University Business School, UK. His current research on trade unions includes partnership agreements, negotiations to change working practices and union learning representatives: the employment effects of buyouts and shareholder value management; and employment practices in small and mediumsized enterprises. He was editor of the Industrial Relations Journal for several years.

    Greg Bamber is a Professor and Director of Research, Department of Management, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. His (joint) publications include, Up in the Air (Cornell); International and Comparative Employment Relations (Sage/Allen & Unwin): Employment Relations in the Asia Pacific (Thomson), Managing Managers (Blackwell); Organisational Change Strategies (Longman). He has published many articles and is on the editorial board of several journals. He is conducting research on notions of high-performance human resource management in hospitals and other sectors. He has served as: an arbitrator for the British Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service; President: Australian & New Zealand Academy of Management, and of the International Federation of Scholarly Associations of Management. He is also a Fellow of the British Academy of Management; an Adjunct Professor, Griffith University, Australia; and Visiting Professor, Newcastle University, England. He has been a visitor at a range of universities in other countries

    Michael Barry is Associate Professor in employment relations at Griffith University. His major research interests are comparative employment relations, worker representation and employee voice, and employer associations. Michael has published on employment relations in various industries, including mining, maritime, meat, and low cost airlines. He is also an elected academic staff representative on the Council of Griffith University.

    Brian E. Becker received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1977. He is currently Professor of Human Resources in the School of Management at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Professor Becker has held several leadership positions in the School, serving as department chair for 13 years and currently as Senior Associate Dean. He has published widely on the financial effects of employment systems, in both union and non-union organizations. His current research and consulting interests focus on the relationship between human resources systems, strategy implementation and firm performance. In addition to a wide range of articles on these topics, Professor Becker is co-author of The HR Scorecard: Linking People, Strategy and Performance (Harvard Business School Press, 2001) and The Workforce Scorecard: Managing Human Capital to Execute Strategy (Harvard Business School Press, 2005). His most recent book (co-authored with Mark A. Huselid and Richard Beatty) is The Differentiated Workforce, published by HBS Press in 2009.

    Devasheesh Bhave is an assistant professor at Concordia University's John Molson School of Business. He received his PhD at the Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota. His research spans issues related to the employment relationship, electronic performance monitoring, and emotional regulation in the workplace.

    Paul Boselie is an Associate Professor in Human Resource Studies in the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Tilburg University. His research traverses HRM and performance, new institutionalism, HRM and compliance, HR roles and competencies, and people management in health care. He is the European Editor of Personnel Review. Paul's research has been published in Applied Psychology, Human Relations, Human Resource Management Journal, International Journal of HRM, International Journal of Manpower, Journal of Management Studies, Management Revue and Personnel Review. In 2010 his book on Strategic Human Resource Management (McGraw-Hill) will be published focused on a European continental HR approach.

    Michelle Brown is an Associate Professor in the Department of Management & Marketing, University of Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests are in the areas of pay and performance management systems, employee involvement and organisational cynicism. Her research seeks to understand the unintended consequences of human resource management policies and practices. Recent papers have been published in Human Resource Management, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Journal of Labor Research and Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources.

    John W. Budd is the Industrial Relations Land Grant Chair at the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management. His current research interests include theorizing work, unionism over the life course, and other industrial relations topics. His books include Employment with a Human Face: Balancing Efficiency, Equity, and Voice (Cornell University Press), Labor Relations: Striking a Balance (McGraw-Hill/Irwin), and Invisible Hands, Invisible Objectives: Bringing Workplace Law and Public Policy Into Focus (with Stephen Befort, Stanford University Press).

    Pawan S. Budhwar is a Professor of International Human Resource Management and Head of Work and Organisational Psychology Group at Aston Business School. He is also the Director of the Aston India Foundation for Applied Business Research and Aston Centre for Human Resources. He received his doctorate from Manchester Business School. Pawan has published a large number of articles on People Management related topics for the Indian context in leading journals such as Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of World Business, Organization Studies, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Organizational Behaviour, Journal of Labor Research, International Journal of HRM and British Journal of Management. He has also written and co-edited books on HRM in the Asia-Pacific, HRM in the Middle-East, HRM in Developing Countries, Performance Management Around the Globe, the Changing Face of People Management in India and Major Works in International HRM. He is the Senior Associate Editor of British Journal of Management and Associate Editor of International Journal of Cross Cultural Management. Pawan is also an advisor to the Commonwealth Commission on Scholarships and Fellowships and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

    Wayne F. Cascio received his Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Rochester. Currently he holds the Robert H. Reynolds Chair in Global Leadership at the University of Colorado Denver. He has served as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Chair of the SHRM Foundation, the HR Division of the Academy of Management, and as a member of the Academy of Management's Board of Governors. He has authored or edited 22 books on human resource management, including Investing in People (with John Boudreau, 2008), Managing Human Resources (8th ed., 2010), and Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management (7th ed., with Herman Aguinis, forthcoming). He is a two-time winner of the best-paper award from the Academy of Management Executive for his research on downsizing and responsible restructuring. In 1999 he received the Distinguished Career award from the HR Division of the Academy of Management. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of Geneva (Switzerland) in 2004, and in 2008 he was named by the Journal of Management as one of the most influential scholars in management in the past 25 years. Dr. Cascio is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources, the Academy of Management, and the American Psychological Association.

    Derek Chapman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary, in Alberta, Canada. He earned his Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Waterloo in 2000. His current research interests focus on recruiting, person-organization fit, selection interviews, and technology use in recruiting and selection. His work has appeared in a variety of publications including the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology and the International Journal of Selection and Assessment.

    Saba Colak oglu received her Ph.D in Industrial Relations and Human Resources from the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University. Sheiscurrently an Assistant Professor of Management at Berry College, Campbell School of Business in Rome, GA. Her research focuses on knowledge management, strategic human resource management, and expatriate assignment management in multinational corporations. Saba has presented her work at the annual conferences of the Academy of Management and her research on these topics appeared in the International Journal of Human Resource Management, Human Resource Management Review, and Human Resource Management Journal.

    Fang Lee Cooke is Professor of Human Resource Management and Chinese Studies at Manchester Business School, the University of Manchester. She received her PhD from the University of Manchester, UK. Her research interests are in the area of employment relations, trade unions, gender and employment, strategic HRM, knowledge management and innovation, outsourcing, Chinese outward FDI and Chinese diaspora. Fang is the author of HRM, Work and Employment in China (2005) and Competition, Strategy and Management in China (2008). She has published over 80 academic journal articles and book chapters, in addition to numerous refereed international conference papers.

    Yaw A. Debrah is Professor of Human Resource and International Management at the Swansea University (University of Wales, Swansea), UK. He earned his Ph.D from Warwick Business School, Warwick University, UK. He has held academic positions at Brunel University, Cardiff University (University of Wales, Cardiff, UK), and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore). In addition he has worked in Africa, Canada and USA. He has published numerous articles on HRM in Asia and HRM and International Business/Management in Africa. In addition, he has edited five books including Migrant Workers in Asia, Globalization, Work, and Employment, Managing Human Resources in Africa and Human Resource Management in Developing Countries. His scholarly work has appeared in journals such as Human Relations, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behaviour, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Asia Pacific Journal of Management; Asia-Pacific Journal of Human Resources, Asia-Pacific Business Review, Australian Journal of Management, and Thunderbird International Business Review. He is on the editorial board of International Journal of Human Resource Management, Ghana Policy Review, African Journal of Economic and Management Studies and Scientific Journal of Administrative Development.

    Graham Dietz is a Lecturer in HRM and Organisational Behavior at Durham Business School, Durham University. He is also the Director of the school's four MA programmes. He completed his doctorate on workplace partnership at the London School of Economics in 2002. His research revolves around trust in the workplace: how it is built, maintained and enhanced, but also how it can be repaired again after it is destroyed. He has published in several leading international journals, including Academy of Management Review, International Journal of Human Resource Management and Human Resource Management Journal. He is currently working on research into the influence of trust dynamics on the formation of new joint consultative committees.

    Lee Dyer is professor of Human Resource Management and Chair of the Department of Human Resource Studies at the ILR School, Cornell University. He holds BBA, MBA, and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research and teaching interests focus on organizational agility and complexity and human resource strategy. He has consulted and lectured on these and related topics world-wide. He has published several dozen journal articles and book chapters and over a dozen books and monographs. His editorial board assignments include People and Strategy, International Journal of Human Resource Management, and Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources. He served as founding director of Cornell's Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS) for eight years and currently sits on the Center's Advisory Board. Professor Dyer was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources in 1994 and received the Academy of Management's Herbert G. Heneman Jr. Career Achievement Award in 2003 and the Society of Human Resource Management's Michael R. Losey Human Resource Research Award in 2004.

    Paul Edwards is Professor of Industrial Relations at Warwick Business School. His research interests include new forms of work organization, comparative workplace employee relations and employee relations in small firms. He was formerly deputy director and director of IRRU, editor of Work, Employment and Society and associate editor of Human Relations. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1998.

    Jeff Ericksen is an Assistant Professor in the School of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include human resource scalability, strategic HRM, emerging organizational forms and work systems, and project team mobilization, development, and performance. His work has been published in AdministrativeScience Quarterly, Human Resource Management, and the International Journal of Human Resource Management.

    Anthony Ferner has been Professor of International Human Resource Management in Leicester Business School, De Montfort University, since 1998. Since the early 1990s his main area of research has been on employment practices and human resources in multinational companies. His particular interests are in the impact of national business system characteristics on the behaviour of multinationals. He has published widely in academic journals, including the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Journal of International Business Studies, and Organization Studies. His books include (co-edited with Phil Almond) American Multinationals in Europe: Managing Employment Relations Across National Borders, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2006, and (co-edited with Javier Quintanilla and Carlos Sánchez-Runde), Multinationals, Institutions and the Construction of Transnational Practices. Convergence and Diversity in the Global Economy. Basingstoke, Palgrave 2006. Current projects include a comparative study of the relationship between multinationals and regional ‘governance’ actors.

    Tim Finch-Lees has spent the bulk of his managerial career with Diageo PLC, occupying a variety of senior positions in the UK, France and South America. Before this, he worked for Allied-Signal in France and the USA and for Booz Allen and Hamilton in London. Currently, he is on a break from his doctoral research at Birkbeck, University of London looking after his 15 month old son, Archie.

    Barry Gerhart is Professor of Management and Human Resources and the Bruce R. Ellig Distinguished Chair in Pay and Organizational Effectiveness, School of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include compensation, human resource strategy, international human resources, and employee movement. Professor Gerhart received his B.S. in Psychology from Bowling Green State University and his Ph.D. in Industrial Relations from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He serves on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Journal, Human Relations, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Management Revue, and Personnel Psychology. Professor Gerhart is a past recipient of the Scholarly Achievement Award and of the International Human Resource Management Scholarly Research Award, both from the Human Resources Division, Academy of Management. He is also a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    Jody Hoffer Gittell is Associate Professor of Management and MBA Program Director at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Gittell's research explores how relational coordination by front-line workers contributes to quality and efficiency outcomes in high-pressure service settings. Her book The Southwest Airlines Way: Using the Power of Relationships to Achieve High Performance won the 2005 Sloan Industry Studies Best Book Award. Her paper titled “A Relational Model of How High Performance Work Systems Work” won a 2008 Best Paper Award in the HR Division of the Academy of Management. Recent books include Up in the Air: How Airlines Can Improve Performance by Engaging Their Employees and High Performance Healthcare: Using the Power of Relationships to Achieve Quality, Efficiency and Resilience. Gittell received her PhD from the MIT Sloan School of Management, her MAfrom The New School for Social Research and her BA from Reed College.

    Howard Gospel is Professor of Management and Senior Research Fellow at King's College University of London. He is also an Associate Fellow of the Said Business School, University of Oxford, and of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics. His research interests are employer labour policy, corporate governance and labour management, employee voice systems, and skill formation and training. He studies these in historical and comparative perspective, with a particular interest in the UK, US, Germany, France, and Japan.

    Francis Green is Professor of Economics at the University of Kent. After graduating in Physics at Oxford University, he studied Economics at the LSE, before writing his PhD thesis at Birkbeck College. His research focuses on labour economics, with special interests in skills, training, work quality and employment relations. He has published nine books and many papers in journals in book collections. He regularly provides consultancy advice for government departments, the European Commission and the OECD. His most recent book, “Demanding Work. The Paradox of Job Quality in the Affluent Economy”, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.

    Anne-Marie Greene is Associate Professor (Reader) in Industrial Relations at the University of Warwick Business School. She is a member of the editorial boards of Gender, Work and Organization and Equal Opportunities International. Her research interests include the theory and practice of diversity and equality; equality and diversity issues within trade unions; and e-collectivism, particularly the use of ICTs by trade unions. She has published widely on these subjects in journals including Work, Employment and Society; European Journal of Industrial Relations; Gender, Work and Organization; Industrial Relations Journal; International Journal of Human Resource Management; and Economic and Industrial Democracy. She is co-author of Diversity Management in the UK: Organizational and Stakeholder Approaches (Routledge, 2009) and The Dynamics of Managing Diversity: A Critical Approach (Elsevier, 2005); and author of Voices from the Shop floor: Dramas of the Employment Relationship (Ashgate, 2001).

    John J. Haggerty is a Doctoral candidate at the Cornell University ILR School in Ithaca, New York where he studies with Patrick M. Wright. He is also the managing director of ILR Executive Education. John's research interests are primarily in macro HR with an emphasis on the impact of the HR function on firm performance. John has his BS in Industrial and Labor relations from Cornell, and an MBA from Case Western Reserve University. Prior to returning to Cornell for his PhD, John had a 27 year career as an HR practitioner, including 21 years at General Electric where he was the Vice President of Human Resources for their Industrial Systems business.

    Richard Hall is Associate Professor of Work and Organisational Studies at the University of Sydney. His current research concerns the effects of MNC HR policies on host country practices and policies, the impact of HR Information Systems on HR strategy, and the dynamics of new technology and organizational change. With a high degree of critical scepticism, he teaches in the areas of international HRM, leadership and organizational change. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Industrial Relations. His most recent book, New Technology @ Work, was co-authored with Paul Boreham, Rachel Parker and Paul Thompson and was published by Routledge in 2008.

    Gail Hebson is a Lecturer in Employment Studies in the Manchester Business School, University of Manchester. Her research interests include gender and class divisions in employment, the changing nature of work and careers and the experience of work in low-skilled occupations. She has published on changing gender relations in the context of organizational change (in Marchington et al (2005) Fragmenting Work: Blurring Organisational Boundaries and Disordering Hierarchies) and published journal articles on renewing class analysis in studies of paid work, critically analyzing industrial relations research from a gendered perspective and the changing nature of emotional labour in the teaching profession.

    Ying Hong is a PhD candidate in the Department of Human Resource Management in the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University. Her research interests include strategic HRM and service linkage research, and she has published in journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology and Human Resource Management Review.

    Mark A. Huselid is Professor of HR Strategy in the School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR) at Rutgers University. His research is focused on the linkages between HR management systems, corporate strategy, and firm performance. In addition, he also has an active research and consulting program focused on the development of balanced measurement systems to reflect the contribution of the workforce, workforce management systems, and the HR management function to business success. Dr. Huselid was the Editor of the Human Resource Management Journal from 2000–2004, and is a current or former member of numerous professional and academic boards. Dr. Huselid is the author of The HR Scorecard: Linking People, Strategy & Performance (with Brian Becker and Dave Ulrich), The Work force Scorecard: Managing Human Capital to Execute Strategy (with Brian Becker and Dick Beatty), and The Differentiated Workforce: Transforming Talent Into Strategic Impact (with Brian Becker and Dick Beatty).

    Katy Huxley is a research assistant at Cardiff Business School. Her research interests are based around industrial/employment relations and the experiences of women in work. Notable publications include an edited volume with Keith Whitfield, Innovations in the 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey (2007), and a paper published in Industrial Relations Journal ‘Does partnership at work increase trust?’ (Co-authored with David Guest, William Brown and Riccardo Peccei, 2008). Having completed an MA at Nottingham Trent and an MSc at Cardiff University, she is currently undertaking a PhD investigating the impact of union learning representatives in the workplace.

    Richard Johnstone is a Professor and Director of the Socio-Legal Research Centre in the Griffith Law School, Griffith University, Queensland. Richard was the founding Director of the National Research Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Regulation at the Australian National University and is currently co-Director of the Centre. Richard's research interests are in labour law, regulation (particularly OHS regulation) and legal education. He has researched OHS standard setting, OHS enforcement, worker participation in OHS, and the regulation of OHS in relation to precarious and contingent workers. His books include Occupational Health and Safety Law and Policy (Thompson Law Book, 1997 and 2 ed 2004), Occupational Health and Safety, Courts and Crime: The Legal Construction of Occupational Health and Safety Offences in Victoria, (Federation Press, 2003); and Regulating Workplace Safety: Systems and Sanctions, Oxford Socio-legal Series, Oxford University Press, Oxford (OUP, 1999, with N Gunningham).

    Brian S. Klaas is a Professor of Management and Chair of the Management Department at the Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina. He received his Ph.D. from the Industrial Relations Research Institute at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Professor Klaas teaches, conducts research, and consults in such areas as workplace dispute resolution, HR in the small and medium enterprise, and compensation. He has published in such journals as Personnel Psychology, Industrial Relations, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Journal of Management, Journal of Labor Research, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Human Resource Management. His research has been funded by grants from the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, the Riegel & Emory HR Center, and the Society of Human Resource Management.

    Thomas A. Kochan is the George M. Bunker Professor at MIT's Sloan School of Management and Co-Director of the MIT Institute for Work and Employment Research. He received his Ph.D. in Industrial Relations from the University of Wisconsin. His most recent books are Restoring the American Dream: A Working Families’ Agenda for America, 2005, Up in the Air: How Airlines can Improve Performance by Engaging their Employees, 2009, and Healing Together: The Kaiser Permanente Labor Management Partnership, 2009. He is a Past President of the International Industrial Relations Association and the Industrial Relations Research Association and was elected to the National Academy of Human Resources in 1997.

    David P. Lepak is Professor and Chairperson of the HRM department in the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University. His research interests focus on the strategic management of human capital. He has published numerous articles on this topic in leading academy journals and has presented on this topic to many domestic and international audiences. He is associate editor of Academy of Management Review and currently serves on the editorial boards of Academy of Management Journal, Human Resource Management, Journal of Management Studies, Human Resource Management Journal, and Journal of Business and Psychology.

    Filip Lievens is Professor at the Department of Personnel Management and Work and Organizational Psychology at Ghent University, Belgium. In 1999, he earned his Ph.D. from the same university. His current research interests focus on selection procedures (e.g., assessment centers, situational judgment tests) and organizational attractiveness. He has published among others in the Annual Review of Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Human Resource Management, Intelligence, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. He has received several awards including the Best Paper Award from the International Personnel Management Association (2001), the Distinguished Early Career Award from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (2006), and the Douglas W. Bray – Ann Howard Award from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (2007).

    Victoria Lim is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. Her doctoral thesis focuses on the tactics managers use when communicating negative as part of the performance management process and their rationale for the choice of tactics. She tests the effectiveness of a managers’ negative feedback tactics by examining employee reactions to those tactics. Victoria holds a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) degree. During her honours year, Victoria's research focused on performance related pay in Australian organisations. She is currently working in the public sector as a survey consultant.

    Rebecca Loudoun, Ph.D. is a Lecturer in the Department of Employment Relations at Griffith University and a member of the Socio-Legal Research Centre. Since 2002, Rebecca has worked at the University teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses in occupational health and safety, negotiation and employment relations. She has also worked on a range of research projects focussing on broad organisational, social and economic issues that influence health and safety performance. She has a particular interest in the ill-effects of shiftwork and other work systems and the nexus between workplace bargaining and occupational health and safety (OHS), including the role of unions in influencing health and safety outcomes

    Christopher Mabey is Professor of HRM at Birmingham University Business School. He directs the Centre for Leadership at the University of Birmingham (CLUB) and is Director of the DBA. Since his days as an Occupational Psychologist for British Telecom and Head of Management Training for Rank Xerox (UK), Chris has been intrigued by the possibilities, the pitfalls and the paradoxes that accompany management and leadership development. He has researched and written about it from many angles, most recently in a book co-written with Tim Finch-Lees and published by Sage in 2008 called Management and Leadership Development. For more on this, current research and other publications see: http://www.business.bham.ac.uk/staff/mabeyc

    Mick Marchington is Professor of Human Resource Management at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester. He has also held visiting posts at the Universities of Sydney, Auckland and Paris, and is currently the 40th Anniversary Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Employment Studies. He has published widely on HRM, including about twenty books and monographs and nearly 150 book chapters and papers in refereed journals. He is best known for his work on employee involvement and participation, and on the link between line managers and HR professionals, as well as more recent research examining HRM across organisational boundaries. He is Co-Editor of the HRMJ and is Joint Chair of the HRM Study Group of the International Industrial Relations Association, and has occupied a range of chief examiner roles at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. He is a Chartered Companion of the CIPD.

    Jonathan Michie holds a Chair at the University of Oxford where he is Director of the Department for Continuing Education and President of Kellogg College. Previously he was Professor of Management at the University of Birmingham where he was the Director of Birmingham Business School. Before that he held the Sainsbury Chair of Management at Birkbeck, University of London, where he was Head of the School of Management & Organizational Psychology, and prior to that was at the Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. Before moving into academia he worked in Brussels as an Expert to the European Commission on the employment, skills and training implications of technological and regulatory developments in the Information Technology & Telecommunications sector. Professor Michie is a Council Member of Acas, and a member of the Department for Business, Enterprise, and Regulatory Reform's Advisory Forum on the effects of employment legislation.

    Shad S. Morris (Ph.D. Cornell University) is Assistant Professor of Management at the Fisher College of Business, The Ohio State University. Professor Morris teaches and conducts research in the areas of international business and strategic human resource management, particularly focusing on how global firms create value through people and knowledge. Professor Morris has also consulted with a variety of multinational firms and multilateral organizations.

    Sandra Ohly is currently assistant professor in industrial and organizational psychology at the Goethe University of Frankfurt. She received her PhD from the Technical University of Braunschweig. Her research focuses on creativity at work, proactive behavior and suggestion making. She is also interested in the effects of time pressure on motivation and organizational behavior and in emotions, organizational change and resistance to change. Her research has been published in Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, Journal of Applied Psychology and European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology

    Jaap Paauwe (1953, PhD Erasmus University Rotterdam) is Professor of Human Resource Studies at Tilburg University and also affiliated to Erasmus University Rotterdam, School of Economics. His main research interests are in the area of HRM and Performance, corporate strategy and change, industrial relations and institutional theory. In 1991 he was Academic Visitor at the London School of Economics. In 1996 he was Visiting Professor at Templeton College, Oxford University (UK) and in 2005 he joined Cornell University (Ithaca, USA) as a visiting fellow. His latest book is on HRM and Performance: achieving long term viability (Oxford University Press, June 2004), for which he received the Dutch HRM network Award in 2005. Together with Cambridge, INSEAD and Cornell University he is involved in a large scale international research project on improving the excellence of the HR function within multinational companies. Recently the research group at Tilburg has initiated an international research project focused on the topic of HR governance and risk management.

    Sharon K. Parker is a Professor of Organizational Psychology and Director at the Institute of Work Psychology, University of Sheffield. Her research interests are focused on proactive behavior, work design, self-efficacy, and employee perspective taking. She has published 5 books, over thirty internationally refereed journal articles (including publications in top tier journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology and Academy of Management Journal), over 30 book chapters and encyclopedia entries, numerous articles in practitioner outlets, and more than 60 technical reports. Professor Parker is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology.

    Chris Provis is an Associate Professor in the School of Management at the University of South Australia. He originally studied and taught philosophy, then worked for some years in industrial relations, and has published papers in both areas. His present research interests lie especially in areas of business ethics, and his book Ethics and Organisational Politics was published by Edward Elgar in 2004. He is a past president of the Australian Association of Professional and Applied Ethics, and an active member of the Ethics Centre of South Australia.

    Monder Ram is Professor of Small Business at De Montfort University and Director of the Centre for Research in Ethnic Minority Entrepreneurship. He is a leading researcher on ethnic minority entrepreneurship and has published widely on the subject. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and a director of the Institute of Small Business Affairs. Monder is also a member of the Department of Trade and Industry's Ethnic Minority Business Forum and Small Business Council.

    Tom Redman is Professor of Human Resource Management and Director of Research at University of Durham Business School. His books include Managing Managers (1993) and Managing through TQM: Theory and Practice (1998). He is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

    Rob Seidner is a PhD student in the Graduate Program in Public Administration at the University of Illinois–Chicago. He earned his MBA from Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management, as well his BA from Brande is. He completed a Presidential Management Fellow appointment as a human resource specialist in the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. His primary research interests involve Federal human capital practices, including recruitment, pay for performance, accountability and high performance human resource work systems. He is the co-author of “Federated Human Resource Management in the Federal Government: The Intelligence Community Model,” published by the IBM Center for the Business of Government. Seidner has also published chapters in Innovations in Human Resource Management: Getting the Public's Work Done in the 21st Century and Public Human Resource Management: Problemsand Prospects (5th Edition). With Dr. Gittell, Seidner has coauthored an award-winning article in Organization Science.

    Scott A Snell is Professor of Business Administration, Scott teaches in the Leadership and Organization area in Darden. He is author of over fifty publications in professional journals and edited texts and has co-authored three books: Management: Leading and Collaborating in a Competitive World, Managing Human Resources, and Managing People and Knowledge in Professional Service Firms. Professor Snell has worked with companies such as American Express, Astra Zeneca, CIGNA, Deutsche Telekom, Shell and the World Bank to address the alignment of human resource issues and strategic management.

    Prior to joining the Darden faculty in 2007 Scott was Professor and Director of Executive Education at Cornell University's Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS) and Professor of Management in the Smeal College of Business at Pennsylvania State University

    Phyllis Tharenou is a Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Division of Business at the University of South Australia, currently on leave of absence working in the Australian Research Council, a grants funding agency of the Australian Federal Government, as the Executive Director of Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences. She received her PhD in organizational psychology from the University of Queensland. Her current research interests are in receptivity to international work, self-initiated international careers and repatriation, and gender differences in receptivity to international careers and career advancement. She has published in the areas of managerial career advancement, gender differences in career advancement, training and development, international careers, absenteeism, and employee self-esteem, including in the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    Nick Wailes is an associate professor in Work and Organisational Studies at the University of Sydney. He teaches comparative employment relations and strategic management. His current research focuses on the spillover effects of the HR practices of MNCs in host countries. His research has been published in leading international journals including the International Journal of Human Resource Management, the British Journal of Industrial Relations and the Journal of Business Ethics. Nick is the chair of the scientific committee for the International Industrial Relations Association 15th World Congress.

    Janet Walsh is a Professor of Human Resource Management and Employment Relations in the Department of Management, King's College London. Prior to her appointment at King's College London, she has held positions at the Universities of Cambridge, Leeds, Melbourne and Royal Holloway, University of London. She has published widely in the areas of customer service work, employment flexibility and non-standard work arrangements, particularly part-time work. She is currently conducting research with the British Law Society's Association of Women Solicitors on women solicitors’ careers, work-life balance and use of flexible work arrangements.

    Keith Whitfield is Professor of Human Resource Management and Economics and Associate Dean for Postgraduate Studies at Cardiff Business School, and Director of Cardiff University's Research and Graduate School in the Social Sciences. His research centres on the impact of human resource management policies on the performance of organisations and on the work experience of employees. Recent papers have focused on financial participation, employee involvement and the employee experience of work. He was the ESRC's Senior Academic Consultant for the fifth Workplace Employment Relations Survey and a member of its Steering Group. Along with William Brown, Alex Bryson and John Forth, he has just completed an analysis of the evolution of employment relations of the modern British workplace, using all five of the WIRS/WERS surveys (published by Cambridge University Press in May 2009). He has also recently undertaken research for the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development on the imapct of labour market structures and skills development systems on innovation and entrepreneurship, and for the Economic and Scoial Research Council and UK Health and Safety Exectuive on Employee Well-Being.

    Adrian Wilkinson is Professor of Employment Relations at Griffith University and Director of the Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing. He is also Visiting Professor at Loughborough University Business School. His books include Making Quality Critical (1995), Managing Quality and Human Resource (1997) Managing through TQM: Theory and Practice (1998), Understanding Work and Employment: Industrial Relations in Transition (2003) and Human Resource Management at Work (2008). He is a Fellow and Accredited Examiner of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. He is Chief Editor of the International Journal of Management Reviews and Associate Editor of the Human Resource Management Journal.


    • Loading...
Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website