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Keith Richards

In: The SAGE Handbook of Geographical Knowledge

Chapter 11: The Weather Station and the Meteorological Office

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The Weather Station and the Meteorological Office
The weather station and the meteorological office
Vernacular Observational Meteorology

The weather swirls about us continuously, so to try to pin it down and represent it is quite a challenge. We inhabit the lowest part of a turbulent gaseous column 8–15 kilometres thick, so we only feel the temperature, wind and rain in an earthbound existence within this so-called ‘boundary layer’. Our immediate experience therefore excludes us from the complete dynamics acting over the whole depth of the troposphere, although we are able to observe the skies above indirectly through the behaviour of clouds. What we are able to experience, of course, is the way in which the weather changes over time; for example, through the seasons and in relation ...

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