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Michael E. Roloff & Courtney Waite Miller

In: The SAGE Handbook of Conflict Communication: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice

Chapter 4: Social Cognition Approaches to Understanding Interpersonal Conflict and Communication

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Social Cognition Approaches to Understanding Interpersonal Conflict and Communication
Social cognition approaches to understanding interpersonal conflict and communication

Conflict seems to occur in most interpersonal relationships and especially those that are intimate (Argyle & Furnham, 1983). Although scholars opine that interpersonal conflict can be functional, empirical evidence indicates that its potential is not often realized. Individuals often use negative metaphors to describe their everyday conflicts (McCorkle & Mills, 1992), and intimates frequently regret the attacks and criticisms that they express to one another (Knapp, Stafford, & Daly, 1986). Arguments account for 80% of the variance in a person's negative mood (Bolger, DeLongis, Kessler, & Schilling, 1989) and negative affectivity arising from an interpersonal conflict often leads to sleep disruption the night of the disagreement (Brissette & ...

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