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Stella Ting-Toomey & Jiro Takai

In: The SAGE Handbook of Conflict Communication: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice

Chapter 25: Explaining Intercultural Conflict: Promising Approaches and Directions

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Explaining Intercultural Conflict: Promising Approaches and Directions
Explaining intercultural conflict: Promising approaches and directions

Intercultural conflict takes place when visible or invisible cultural group membership factors shape a conflict communication exchange process between members of two or more different cultural communities. The cultural membership differences can include deep-level differences such as cultural world-views and values. Concurrently, they can also include the mismatch of applying different expectations in a particular conflict scene. Conflict can be an emotionally threatening interaction process that entails perceived or actual incompatibility of values, norms, goals, face orientations, uneven power currencies, scarce resources, and/or conflict styles between two or more interdependent parties in a face-to-face or mediated situation (Ting-Toomey & Oetzel, 2001).

Culture is a learned system of meanings that fosters a particular sense ...

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