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Mark P. Orbe & Melodi A. Everett

In: The SAGE Handbook of Conflict Communication: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice

Chapter 21: Interracial and Interethnic Conflict and Communication in the United States

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Interracial and Interethnic Conflict and Communication in the United States
Interracial and interethnic conflict and communication in the United States

Conflict is an inevitable part of the human experience (Roloff, 1987). Consequently, people in relationships find themselves in conflict on a regular basis (Collier, 1991). When in conflict, individuals often demonstrate preferences for certain communication styles (Roloff, 1987), a cognitive process that cannot be separated from the cultural context in which it resides (Kitayama, Markus, Matsumoto, & Norasakkunkit, 1997; Orbe, 1998a). As part of an individual's ethnic background, he or she is taught how to deal with conflict through his or her family and friends (Collier, 1991). In this regard, ethnicity and culture are the frames through which we view, experience, and perceive conflict (Ribeau, 1995).

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