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Edward L. Fink, Deborah A. Cai & Qi Wang

In: The SAGE Handbook of Conflict Communication: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice

Chapter 2: Quantitative Methods for Conflict Communication Research, with Special Reference to Culture

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Quantitative Methods for Conflict Communication Research, with Special Reference to Culture
Quantitative methods for conflict communication research, with special reference to culture

In their book on processes of social conflict, Pruitt and Carnevale (1993) noted the difficulties in studying conflict. Experimental studies provide control of extraneous variables, but in a simulated setting. On the other hand, manipulating conflict in laboratory or field experiments raises other concerns: If the manipulation is effective, the ethics of the investigation may be problematic; if the manipulation is ineffective, the lack of internal validity means that the investigation cannot inform us about conflict processes. Naturalistic studies are hard to come by, and, when available, have their own problems of internal and external validity (see Cook & Campbell, 1979). Furthermore, in everyday ...

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