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Randi C. Martin & Denise H. Wu

In: Handbook of Cognition

Chapter 17: The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language

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The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language
The cognitive neuropsychology of language
Randi C.Martin, Denise H.Wu

The best-known model in the cognitive neuropsychology of language is no doubt the Wernicke-Lichtheim model (Wernicke, 1874; Lichtheim, 1885). According to this model, auditory word representations that are essential to language comprehension are represented in a posterior left hemisphere brain region termed Wernicke's area, whereas the motor word representations that are essential to language production are represented in an anterior left hemisphere brain region termed Broca's area. Both areas connect to a more distributed, less localized concept center, which contains the semantic representations for words. Damage to Broca's area spares comprehension but disrupts speech production, resulting in slow, labored articulation. Damage to Wernicke's area disrupts comprehension but spares production in terms of fluency. ...

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