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Peter C. M. Molenaar

In: Handbook of Cognitive Aging: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Chapter 5: Consequences of the Ergodic Theorems for Classical Test Theory, factor Analysis, and the Analysis of Developmental Processes

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Consequences of the Ergodic Theorems for Classical Test Theory, factor Analysis, and the Analysis of Developmental Processes
Consequences of the ergodic theorems for classical test theory, factor analysis, and the analysis of developmental processes

The currently dominant approach to statistical analysis in psychology and biomedicine is based on analysis of interindividual variation. Differences between subjects, drawn from a population of subjects, provide the information for making inferences about states of affairs at the population level (e.g., mean and/or covariance structure). This approach underlies all standard statistical analysis techniques, such as analysis of variance, regression analysis, path analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multilevel modeling techniques. Whether the data are obtained in cross-sectional or longitudinal designs (or more elaborated designs, such as sequential designs), the statistical analysis ...

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