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Alina Camacho-Gingerich, Susan Branco-Rodriguez, Raúl Pitteri & Rafael Javier

In: Handbook of Adoption: Implications for Researchers,Practitioners, and Families

Chapter 10: International Adoption of Latin American Children:Psychological Adjustment, Cultural, and Legal Issues

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International Adoption of Latin American Children:Psychological Adjustment, Cultural, and Legal Issues
International adoption of latin american children: Psychologicaladjustment, cultural, and legal issues

In the United States, as well as in several other countries, the practice ofadopting children from foreign countries emerged in the post-World War II period(Lovelock, 2000; McRoy, 1991; Weil, 1984) as a response to the needs of thedisplaced children of Europe during and after the war. The firstprovision for intercountry adoption into the United States was PresidentTruman's directive of December 22, 1945, which allowed for the migrationof refugees and minors not accompanied by family members (Lovelock, 2000). Thechildren came primarily from Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Germany. Theresponsibility for caring for these children fell on both the federal governmentand private agencies. Some of the ...

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