Previous Chapter Chapter 33: Being Mindful of Automaticity in Addiction: A Clinical Perspective Next Chapter

G. Alan Marlatt & Brian D. Ostafin

In: Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction

Chapter 33: Being Mindful of Automaticity in Addiction: A Clinical Perspective

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Being Mindful of Automaticity in Addiction: A Clinical Perspective
Being mindful of automaticity in addiction: A clinical perspective

Clinical experience and research demonstrate that although interventions may initially benefit addictive behaviors, these effects typically do not last (Catalano et al., 1988). This lack of long-term improvement after an initial response characterizes treatment outcome for other disorders as well (Westen & Morrison, 2001). Utilizing implicit cognition in addiction theory and research may hold great promise for coming to a better understanding of both (1) the automatic processes that make addictive behaviors so difficult to change and (2) the treatment strategies that may alter those processes. TheHandbook on Implicit Cognition and Addiction admirably consolidates the known research on these two points. We would like to use this commentary ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website