Previous Chapter Chapter 22: To Drink or Not to Drink: The Role of Automatic and Controlled Cognitive Processes in the Etiology of Alcohol-Related Problems Next Chapter

Reinout W. Wiers, Katrijn Houben, Fren T. Y. Smulders, Patricia J. Conrod & Barry T. Jones

In: Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction

Chapter 22: To Drink or Not to Drink: The Role of Automatic and Controlled Cognitive Processes in the Etiology of Alcohol-Related Problems

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To Drink or Not to Drink: The Role of Automatic and Controlled Cognitive Processes in the Etiology of Alcohol-Related Problems
To drink or not to drink: The role of automatic and controlled cognitive processes in the etiology of alcohol-related problems

Abstract: Explicit measures revealed three basic types of alcohol-related cognitions: positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement (relief), and negative expectancies. Using the same typology, we review studies assessing alcohol-related cognitions with implicit measures. Most research focused on automatic appetitive responses (positive reinforcement). The common model is that an automatic appetitive response tendency can be inhibited by more controlled inhibitory processes. In addition, there is scattered evidence indicating a role for automatic aversive responses to alcohol. Negative reinforcement appears to be more difficult to assess with tests involving single ...

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