Previous Chapter Chapter 5: Working Memory Capacity, Attention Control, and Fluid Intelligence Next Chapter

Richard P. Heitz, Nash Unsworth & Randall W. Engle

In: Handbook of Understanding and Measuring Intelligence

Chapter 5: Working Memory Capacity, Attention Control, and Fluid Intelligence

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Working Memory Capacity, Attention Control, and Fluid Intelligence
Working memory capacity, attention control, and fluid intelligence
Richard P.HeitzNashUnsworthRandall W.Engle

Or take the power of attention. Is this wholly, or partly, or not at all the same as intelligence? All three views are widely held in the literature.

Spearman (1927, p. 13)

The idea that attention is important to intelligence is not novel. Indeed, Spearman (1927) discussed this issue at length. However, the relationship between attention and intelligence was contemplated even earlier, with some of the first empirical evidence provided by Burt (1909). Binet (1903), the father of intelligence testing, also recognized the importance of attention to general intelligence (Sternberg, 1982). William James (1890/1981), too, wrote that “the number of things we may attend to is altogether indefinite, depending on ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top